Fielding Graduate University News

Filmmaker Brings Critically Acclaimed 'Tangerine' to Fielding

Posted by Starshine Roshell on Fri, Jan 29, 2016

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Students, faculty, and friends of Fielding got a behind-the-scenes view of Hollywood—in more ways than one—when filmmaker Sean Baker screened his critically acclaimed film “Tangerine” at Winter Session last week.

Shot on an iPhone and described by the New York Times as “tough yet tender, gritty yet gorgeous,” the Independent film depicts a day in the life of two transgender prostitutes in Hollywood. It was presented by Fielding’s Alonso Center for Psychodynamic Studies, whose director Sam Osherson saw the film last year and was moved by it.

“It portrayed the lives of people who are marginalized in a way I had never seen before,” says Osherson, a Clinical Psychology faculty member who wanted Fielding students to have the opportunity to explore how they can capture human experience in a way that feels real and honest. “I’m always trying to deepen our understanding of what it means to be human and to help our students think about the people we’re working with as human beings with rich stories to tell. Sean Baker has a way of telling that story. It’s not a sentimental perspective, it’s very real.

”Relationships are at the heart of good therapy,” Osherson continues, “and this is about helping us look at a person as a person rather than as a diagnostic category.”

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Filmmaker Sean Baker

After the screening, writer and director Baker answered questions from the audience, which included the Fielding community as well as Santa Barbara therapists, LGBTQ advocates, and students from UC Santa Barbara.

Baker explained that he lives near the Los Angeles neighborhood where the film is set, and wanted to explore its denizens and microcultures on the screen. But rather than create a script and impose it on the place, he spent time hanging out, earning the trust of the locals, getting to know their stories, and seeking their help in developing a story loosely based around their real lives.

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The film’s stars—not professional actors but the real sex workers whom Baker met in the neighborhood—brought a levity and humor to the film, even when it touched on dark subjects from infidelity to addiction.

“Ultimately, we made a comedy,” Baker said, “but underneath the humor there’s a sadness—a sad state of affairs.”

Jennifer Tyburczy, assistant professor of Feminist Studies at UCSB and director of the LGBTQ minor there, brought students to the event from her own Trans-Art class, who are in the process of making their own films.

“The talkback with Baker allowed students to imagine themselves in the roles of director, auteur, and artist,” she says, “and empowered them to think with and through the existing representations of trans experience."

Tyrone Dixon, a Fielding student who graduated with a PhD in Media Psychology last week and is a filmmaker himself, appreciated the perspective that “Tangerine” offered.

“I thought it was a bold and courageous film,” he said. “The filmmakers did a great job of sharing that world.”

Tags: Media psychology, clinical psychology, Film, Alonso

Announcing the Fielding Graduate University Press!

Posted by Starshine Roshell on Thu, Jan 28, 2016

Harvard. Princeton. Stanford. Yale. Cornell. MIT... 

Now Fielding Graduate University joins the list of elite schools publishing under their own university press. Beginning this year, Fielding will publish original scholarly books under the Fielding Graduate University Press imprimatur.

“The purpose of our new academic press is to highlight the excellence of research conducted at Fielding,” said Provost Gerald Porter, PhD.

With two review cycles per year, Fielding invites proposals from faculty and staff across a wide variety of disciplines who wish to publish a book rooted in their scholarship or professional contributions. The first submission deadline is May 15, 2016. Each submission will be reviewed by a panel consisting of one faculty member from each of Fielding’s programs. 

The Fielding Press will be especially receptive to submissions that reflect the university’s commitment to social justice, multidisciplinary and systems approaches, and the creative application of research to produce effective social change.

Since 2013, Fielding has published seven monographs of articles written by our doctoral graduates based on their dissertation research. We’re proud to books of outstanding work by our faculty and staff to our publications.

Tags: books, publishing

Media Psych Students Win Mike Neal Awards

Posted by Starshine Roshell on Fri, Jan 22, 2016

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Fielding's Media Psychology department awarded $1,000 scholarships to Matthew Price and Tunisha Singleton on Thursday evening for their exemplary work in the program.

The Michael R. Neal Legacy Award is given annually to students who demonstrate outstanding academic achievement, media innovation and collaboration with and support of fellow media scholars. 

Singleton helped produce a department webinar series and serves on student government for the American Psychological Association.

“This award is proof that you are a product of your environment,” she said, thanking her cohort for “encouraging me to be myself and believe in myself.”

Among other things, Price was cited for his ambitious program goal: to produce a measurement for emotional engagement.

“When I came into the program, I had a specific idea of what I was looking for,” said Price, who wanted to combine his interests in both technology and psychology. “And I didn’t think I would ever find a school that would let me do that—let alone one that would feel so much like family.”

The Neal Award was created in 2014 in memory of a Fielding student who graduated with a PhD in Media Psychology in 2013 and died just a month later at age 52.

Mike Neal was an extraordinarily accomplished person who held 19 US patents, authored several children’s books, volunteered with Habitat for Humanity and led numerous technology companies. At Fielding, he was known for his passion for helping others, including leading teams of his Fielding colleagues to publish articles and present their work at prestigious conferences around the world.

“He exemplified the kind of person we want to put out into the world,” said Fielding President Katrina Rogers, who knew Neal and spoke of his collaborative and creative spirit, activist approach to scholarship, advocacy in using media for change, and record of putting ideas into practice.

Neal’s wife Teresa and daughter Rianna conferenced in to watch the awards program. Rianna, who is 22, said that her father's terrific experience at Fielding—and the appreciation and support the department has shown her family since his passing—have inspired her to start graduate school now herself.

The scholarship funds for the Neal Award are raised from a fall auction, student donations, and a pizza party at Winter Session. Fielding alumnus Larry Drake has helped spearhead the funding.

Learn more about the Neal Award.

Fielding Launches Marie Fielder Center for Democracy, Leadership, and Education

Posted by Starshine Roshell on Thu, Jan 07, 2016

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On January 15, 2016, Fielding Graduate University will launch its brand new Marie Fielder Center for Democracy, Leadership, and Education, a multidisciplinary research and advocacy center that will advance diversity and inclusion throughout society. It honors the life and legacy of the late Marie Fielder, PhD, a brilliant and influential African American educator and champion for social justice, who was a member of Fielding’s founding family in the 1970s.
The Center aims to become a significant national entity for advancing public discourse and advocacy on social democracy, leadership and especially education—K-12 through university.
“Social and ecological justice has resided at the cornerstone of Fielding’s mission since its founding in 1974,” says Katrina Rogers, PhD, president of Fielding. “Among its earliest leaders was Dr. Marie Fielder, who lived her life in pursuit of justice and inclusion of all people in all aspects of civic life. Through the Marie Fielder Center, Fielding reaffirms its commitment to conducting the research, providing the public and academic education, and engaging in the advocacy in diverse communities that is required to ensure the notion that while ‘the arc of the moral universe is long, it bends toward justice.’”
At the launch event during Winter Session, Fielding will also present the inaugural Marie Fielder medal to Walter Bumphus, PhD, President and CEO of the American Association of Community Colleges.

Tags: research, Marie Fielder

Jean-Pierre Isbouts to Reveal True Story of Walt Disney at Winter Session

Posted by Starshine Roshell on Tue, Jan 05, 2016

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Santa Barbara residents are invited to hear Walt Disney documentarian and Fielding Graduate University faculty member Jean-Pierre Isbouts shed light on the storied and often surprising life of Disney’s founder, illustrated with excerpts from the acclaimed film Walt: The Man Behind the Myth at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 13, 2016, at the Fess Parker DoubleTree Hotel, 633 E. Cabrillo Boulevard.

Fifty years after his death, Walt Disney remains one of the most celebrated — and misunderstood — figures in popular culture.

Narrated by Dick Van Dyke and featuring interviews with luminary Ray Bradbury; stars like Robert Stack, Buddy Ebsen and Fess Parker; and animators who worked on the classic films Snow White,Pinocchio and Fantasia, the film takes an unflinching look at the man behind the world’s greatest entertainment empire.

“He was an ordinary Midwestern guy doing extraordinary things with extraordinary talent,” says Isbouts.

Between clips, he’ll share insider stories gleaned while working on the film.

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“Politically, Walt was a conservative who testified at the House Un-American Activities Committee hearings,” he says. “But from a social justice perspective, he was one of the first to hire African-American animators and to approach his workers on an equal level. These days, there are dozens of layers between the president of a studio and the worker bees — but Walt would sit with his animators and sketch.”

Isbouts teaches media and humanities at Fielding Graduate University and his public talk is part of Fielding’s winter session, when graduate students from across the country convene on the DoubleTree for seminars and workshops in media psychology, human and organizational development and more.

“Disney had a very novel way of creating an organization where people can not only produce and create but innovate,” Isbouts says. “If you don’t innovate in the 21st century, you’re going to die. You must constantly reinvent yourself, and Walt Disney is a magnificent case study of doing just that.”

Seating is limited, so all guests should arrive at the event by 6:45 p.m.

Tags: Organizational development, national session

Fielding's Media Psychology Program Leaves an Impression on Digital Hollywood

Posted by Hilary Molina on Wed, Nov 04, 2015
 by Tunisha Singleton, MA - Current PhD Student | Fielding Graduate University | Co-Chair - APA Div 46 Student Committee |  Member - APA Div 46, 47 | http://www.linkedin.com/pub/tunisha-singleton/85/43a/a82

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Fielding Graduate University made their presence felt at Digital Hollywood in Marina Del Rey, California. Digital Hollywood is a reputable conference in the convergence of entertainment and technology, bringing together the field’s top executives and developers. As a sponsor of the four-day summit, Fielding Graduate University’s Media Psychology program supportively added to the event by bringing fresh perspectives and specialists in cutting-edge fields.

digital_hollywood_hogg_and_rutledge.jpgDigital Hollywood is among the world’s best venues combining technology research and design. The setting became a perfect fit for media psychology’s scholar-practitioner model that aims to understand the psychological impact of media use and creation. Over 25 members of Fielding's media psychology community were present, including prospective and current students, alumni, and faculty.

Director of the Media Psychology PhD Program Jerri Lynn Hogg, PhD, was in attendance and noted that the overall experience was beneficial for both parties. “Patterns in media and new technology emerged in many of the panel discussions,” said Dr. Hogg. “While industry experts work to figure out how to use content and make new platforms, researchers from our program can provide this type of information by explaining the psychology behind it. So it was very energizing to connect industry developers with researchers.”

Digital Hollywood is broken up into multiple tracks emphasizing a particular area within entertainment and technology. A few tracks, for example, include: “Immersive Entertainment: From Movie Theatres to Interactive Surfaces," “The Women’s Summit & Festival: Content, Discussion, & Recognition,” and “Virtual and Augmented Reality: From Sense of Presence to Full Embodiment.” Panels are designed to focus on a specific topic under each theme with speakers who have exceled in that particular field. And representatives from Media Psychology were not only in attendance, but were also called to lead as pioneering examples.

Director of the Media Psychology Masters and Certificate Program, Garry Hare, PhD, moderated a panel titled “AR – VR and the Human Brain: The Impact of Neuromarketing on the Real-Time Design of Immersive Entertainment and Advertising Productions.” Exploring the cognitive science behind the visualization of complex data offered opportunities to showcase the innovative work of Media Psychology graduates.

“Students and faculty experience first hand innovations in immersive media, augmented reality and the future of both mass market and targeted productions,” said Dr. Hare. “Presentations by faculty on media neuroscience and the creation of AR applications were extremely well received, opening the door for future featured panels, presentations, Dr._Christophe_Morin.jpgreal-time research and collaborative product development.”

Leading the way on marketing neuroscience is Fielidng media psychology faculty member Christophe Morin, PhD, whose presentation was filled with stimulating and cutting-edge information that rang new to Digital Hollywood. As CEO of neuromarking agency SalesBrain, Dr. Morin believes that the psychology of neuromarketing is indispensable to the Digital Hollywood community. “The field of neuromarketing offers research methods that measure and predict the effect of media on our nervous system” said Dr. Morin. “I was pleased to see that content producers and marketers are very interested in the field of media neuroscience because our research can explain and predict the effect of advertising, games, and even movies on the brain.”

Interest in neuromarketing and other critical areas were expressed through the consistent flow of attention received at Fielding’s interactive information booth. Maintained over the course of the entire conference, faculty and alumni were able to showcase Fielding’s Media Psychology’s new certificate program with two new specialized concentrations - Media Neuroscience or Brand Psychology and Audience Engagement. Under each specialized focus, the three-course certificate allows industry professionals to gain an understanding of the "why" and "how" behind their work by applying psychological theory.

Fielding media psychology faculty member and Director of the Media Psychology Research Center Pamela Rutledge, PhD, spent several hours interacting with Digital Hollywood’s advertising and creative professionals about the new emphasis of Brand Psychology. “This certificate is designed to help you connect with the consumer and take advantage of the socially-connected, 24/7 world we live in,” said Dr. Rutledge. “Entertainment and technology is not just about the tools...it’s about human behavior. Media environments change. New technologies emerge. But human needs and goals do not. So here you’ll learn to apply psychology to develop and deliver a brand identity and core story that captures your audience’s wants.”

For the Fielding to sponsor Digital Hollywood, several positive outcomes can arise including careers for alumni, research projects for faculty and internships for current students. Third year media psychology doctorl student Matthew Price remarked on how significant it is for Fielding to be present at these events and how valuable it was to be in attendance, “Digital Hollywood was a terrific opportunity for me to network with industry luminaries and examine my place academically and professionally in a real world setting. I think this is one of the truest benefits of an education from Fielding; exposure to the industry and an opportunity to apply our education in a constructive environment."

The Fielding community received an overall enthusiastic reception from Digital Hollywood participants with high anticipation for returning to the next seasonal event. Taking advantage of the high profile opportunity provided by Digital Hollywood’s setting, faculty and alum showcased their unique approach to methodology, production research, and content creation. Doctoral, masters, and certificate programs alike - the Media Psychology program represented Fielding Graduate University well as a formidable leader in higher education, research, and applied innovation.

 

 

 

Tags: Media psychology, technology, psychology, fielding faculty, social media, digital learning, Distributed education, fielding graduate university, distance education, APA Div 46, PhD

In Memory of Fielding Leader Frank Friedlander: A Mentor and Leader with Heart

Posted by Hilary Molina on Mon, Nov 02, 2015

Frank Friedlander

"Frank was a forthright, inquisitive, caring consultant, mentor and was one of my favorite humans...

We worked together for fifteen years jointly running consulting skills workshops every Winter and Summer Session, and invariably he would challenge and console our participants to do the best consulting that the situation allowed. Old fashioned problem solving and challenging his clients and their counselors/coaches was his marker, and he did it with warmth and sensitivity. I miss Frank - he was one of a kind and to me, the penultimate scholar/practitioner."

-Don Bushnell, PhD, Faculty Emeritus and Founding Dean and of the School of Human and Organizational Development, Fielding Graduate University

Frank Friedlander passed away on October 1, 2015 after a brief and relatively painless illness. He felt that he had had a long and rich life, and was quite accepting that it was about to end. He was 88 years old.

Frank was born in South Orange, New Jersey on September 22, 1927. He was always interested in people and why they did what they did. He graduated from Cornell University with a bachelor's degree in psychology in 1950 and went on to earn an MBA from the University of Texas in 1956. Frank then moved to Cleveland, Ohio, and went to Western Reserve University and earned his PhD in social and organizational psychology in 1962.

In 1954 he married Janet Mongan and they raised three children: Todd, Clare and Paul. The marriage ended in 1977. In 1996, he married Margaret Waters, who was his partner for the remainder of his life.

After leaving Western Reserve University with his PhD, Frank began his organization development career. In 1962 the family moved to China Lake, California where he worked at the Naval Ordnance Test Center. While there, he did research on how effective teams worked together.

In the fall of 1966, Frank and his family moved back to Cleveland, Ohio where he joined the faculty of the newly begun Organizational Behavior PhD program at Case Institute of Technology. It was the first program of its kind in the world. For the next 15 years, he taught, consulted, wrote and worked with students on their PhD dissertations. The organizational behavior program was unique at the time in that the students and faculty were considered colleagues - there was not hierarchy of faculty having all of the answers and students being in a constant learning mode - they were all equal colleagues in a rich learning environment. Frank fit in very well in this role because of his values around respect, encouragement, and striving for colleagueship with his fellow faculty and the students with whom he came in contact. He "walked the talk" and was a profound role model for many in the University and his clients.

In 1981, Frank left what is now Case Western Reserve University (the two universities joined in 1968) to join the faculty at the Fielding Graduate University in Santa Barbara, California, where he continued his work as an outstanding faculty member working with students from around the world. During his tenure at Fielding, Frank conducted frequent seminars on organizational development, and consulted in collaboration with Fielding doctoral students who served as "shadow consultants" with nonprofit organizations throughout the U.S. In 2005, Frank and Don Bushnell, PhD, the founding dean of the School of Organization Development, founded the Center for Study of Nonprofit Organizations which became the Institute for Social Innovation at Fielding. Throughout his twenty-five years as senior faculty, he guided the doctoral research initiatives and mentored thirty-five candidates for advanced study at Fielding.

During his teaching career, Frank also was an active member of the Organizational Development Network and was a frequent presenter at their annual conventions. He was also a member of the National Training Laboratories where he led groups of individuals to help them identify their strengths and areas of development as leaders and human beings.

In his later years, Frank was an active member of the Humanist Community and a founding member of the Ethical Culture Society of Silicon Valley in 2006, where he offered valuable organizational support. He led workshops and seminars, led board retreats, and mentored other founders. He was passionate about bringing "heart" into Humanism, which he felt tends towards the "heady." He often talked and wrote in the last few years about how technology made us less connected instead of more connected, and how the loss of human contact in communication left the feelings out of our relationships, which he considered a big loss. Frank always valued and encouraged real and significant interactions with those around him.

Frank made many intellectual and academic contributions over the course of a long and illustrious career. For many years he was a national leader in the study of organizations and in the field of Organization Development. Within HOD he helped develop the systems knowledge area and ran a long-standing and admired consulting skills workshop with founding dean Don Bushnell. His style was one of practical problem solving with a strong dose of challenge for his clients. He value planned agendas for meetings and workshops but successfully co-facilitated with those who had a more improvisational style. Frank was a master at simultaneously tending to content and group process. He was also a notably competitive tennis player.
Frank’s Fielding colleagues speak of his many helpful contributions to their personal and professional development. While his wisdom was highly valued, he sometimes questioned the quality of his own work as well as sought help from others. For example, while he offered guidance for fellow faculty members on how to run a doctoral committee or faculty meeting, he also would ask for advice on how to give feedback on problematic student writing. He was a mentor who always sought improvement. Because of his many talents others sought his endorsement. To quote one colleague, “Do you remember the way he would say, ‘YES!!' when he agreed with you? I do."
Frank was shy and introverted despite an often forthright and inquisitive style when in work role. A person of many facets, colleagues describe him as humble, gentle, kind, inclusive, and nourishing.  He managed to overcome his shyness in several ways including performing at national sessions as one of the HOD Spandex Dancers (you would have to witness it to understand). Frank Friedlander is most fondly remembered and dearly missed.
-Charles McClintock, PhD, School of Human and Organizational Development Professor and Dean Emeritus, Fielding Graduate University
Frank was one of those rare individuals, whether in conversation, over a meal, or in a formal seminar, left others mulling over a challenging idea and filled with the acknowledgement of having been heard. Over the years, I saw him push others--his students, colleagues, friends-- and me, to think more deeply, to pose more critical questions, and to reflect on our assumptions. Passionate about organization development and leadership, he advocated tirelessly for creating organizations that honor the development of the people who work within them. We miss him, but he is always with us at Fielding as he was committed to the way we think about learning and the way we work with our students.
-Katrina S. Rogers, PhD, President, Fielding Graduate University

 

If you would like to share any memories of Frank, please post them on Facebook>Frank Friedlander>public group, or e-mail inmemoryoffrankf@gmail.com

 

Tags: Organizational development, fielding graduate university, human development, PhD, Frank Friedlander, institute for social innovation, katrina rogers

Fielding Graduate University’s Worldwide Network For Gender Empowerment Granted Consultative Status To The United Nations

Posted by Hilary Molina on Sat, Oct 17, 2015

The Worldwide Network for Gender Empowerment (WNGE), a center within Fielding Graduate University, announced today that it was granted special consultative status to the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC).

Acting Chief for the Office of ECOSOC Support and Coordination Alberto Padova wrote, “I am pleased to inform you that the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) at its coordination and management meeting adopted the recommendation of the Committee on Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) to grant special consultative status to your organization. On behalf of all staff of the Non-Governmental Organizations Branch/OESC/DESA, please accept our heartfelt congratulations.”

WNGE, a global organization focused on scholar-activism impacting women’s and gender issues, has been a recognized and registered nongovernmental (NGO) with the United Nations Department of Public Information (DPI) since 2009. This special consultative status elevates WNGE into an elite circle of NGOs working directly with the functional commissions.

ECOSOC status for an organization enables it to actively engage with the United Nations Secretariat, programs, funds and agencies. These activities include:

  • Placement of items of special interest in the provisional agenda of the Council
  • Attendance at meetings and access to the United Nations offices in New York, Geneva and Vienna
  • Submission and circulation of written statements
  • Oral presentations at ECOSOC
  • Consultations with ECOSOC and its subsidiary bodies

“We are extremely pleased to have been granted special consultative status to the UN,” stated Director for WNGE Anna DiStefano, EdD. “This provides us the opportunity to more fully engage in our global advocacy and policy work focused on gender empowerment and equity.”

Fielding Graduate University President Katrina Rogers added, “We are very proud of the accomplishments of WNGE and the recognition the organization has received on the global stage. WNGE is a great example of Fielding’s focus on scholar-activism, social justice and leadership.”

Worldwide Network for Gender Empowerment (WNGE) is an engaged and diverse ecosystem comprised of global members committed to research, collaboration, and action in support of women’s and gender issues. WNGE is focused on impacting change with cross-cutting measures in sectors including education, health care, environment, violence prevention, equality, and globalization.

 

 

Tags: globalization, EdD, women's issues, leadership, fielding graduate university, human rights, katrina rogers

Fielding's New Media Psychology Program Director Jerri Lynn Hogg, PhD On Media Psychology and Technology for Good

Posted by Hilary Molina on Wed, Oct 14, 2015

As president of the American Psychological Association’s Division 46-Society for Media Psychology and Technology, Jerri Lynn Hogg, PhD, now takes on the role as program director of media psychology at Fielding Graduate University.

Jerri Lynn HoggDr. Hogg stepped right into her new role with ease. Coming from years of grounded experience in both academic and professional settings, her teaching experience at a variety of post-secondary organizations, along with her numerous years of involvement in the media psychology program at Fielding, Dr. Hogg is poised and ready to drive media psychology further into the educational forefront of the 21st century. Dr. Hogg's vision of the future of media psychology as a disciple was clearly outlined during her interview for the position of director:

The future of media psychology is impacted by the psychological foundations which form the building blocks of this discipline. These building blocks are what separate us from big media studies departments and other educational areas that hover in the same research space as media psychology. Media psychology is a broad umbrella-based psychology that is grounded in psychology, and also engages theories and research from a variety of other fields that study media and technology.

At Fielding, I believe that we are at a place where we have the opportunity to do something special, to influence peoples’ lives in important and meaningful ways. From understanding how mobile applications can best be used to encourage fitness, or stimulate happiness and mental well-being to create powerful advocacy campaigns and disaster relief efforts, such as the one most recently implemented by the Red Cross app that facilitated donations for the relief efforts in Nepal; we can learn about, demonstrate and research, how emergent technologies are enhancing our lives in powerful ways. By studying the psychological components engaged when we connect with media and technology we can inform better design and application.

For example, we can apply theory to emergent technologies to create and further define dynamic learning environments, use augmented and virtual reality to find new ways to understand and view the world, create delivery models that are media rich in presence, yet can cross geographical and time boundaries, and we can construct media that facilitates socially responsible advocacy for the betterment of humanity. With the ability to connect in more meaningful ways, collaborate cross-boundaries and cultures, share knowledge by making information more readily available and understandable, media psychology is a force for motivation, well-being, and good.

In her newest role as program director, Dr. Hogg continues to affirm the direction she sees the program going and why Fielding is the place for this vision. "It is my goal to continue to foster an energetic research center in media psychology which includes a collaborative learning space and a think-tank environment that provides businesses, organizations, nonprofits, and foundations a place to seek advice, consult, and research the intersection of human behavior and media and technology," stated Dr. Hogg. "My vision for the media psychology program within Fielding is to continue to establish the culture and identity of the program with administration, admissions and marketing, and the university in general, so we can best advertise, promote and attract students who are interested in media psychology...We are best aligned for positive outcomes, and impact, that includes strong student learning and ground breaking research, when there is a good fit. It is the story, the vision, and the cohesive message that allows not only the potential to understand who we are, but creates the vision of what we commit to as a program, a program that embraces the breadth of the field of media psychology in a foundational manner and offers specializations as our core niche. Current proposed certificates in neuroscience, brand psychology, and immersive media are a good start in this direction."

One of Dr. Hogg's areas of interest as a media psychologist is to look at virtual and augmented environments to see how people can bring a sense of presence to these environments - to make it feel as real as when we share physical presence. She frequently speaks on psychological components and influences of media and technology on human behavior and she continues to uncover new areas for research and understanding.

Dr. Hogg began her career studying engineering and then made the unusual jump to journalism and communications. While it might not have made sense at the time to make this transition, it fueled her interest in the science and the technology behind how people are driven to connect and communicate. To this day, she continues to examine a variety of interests, which are primarily based around how media influences people's lives, relationships, and humans make meaning out of life in a highly digitized world. Her passion continues to remain in the ways people connect and make meaning in digital environments. As Dr. Hogg continues her studies as a researcher and as a graduate of the media psychology program at Fielding, she would like to give back to her university and the field she proudly represents.

Tags: Media psychology, APA, psychology, fielding faculty, social media, leadership, clinical psychology, fielding graduate university, graduate education, scholar practitioner

Fielding Alumna and Former Trustee Larraine Matusak, PhD, Receives ILA’s Lifetime Achievement Award

Posted by Hilary Molina on Tue, Oct 13, 2015

larraine matusak.jpgOne of Fielding Graduate University’s first students to graduate in 1975 and former Fielding board member, Larraine Matusak, PhD, is one of this year’s ILA's Lifetime Achievement Award honorees.

In 1974, Dr. Matusak’s dissertation, Evaluation of the Alternative Degree Programs of the General College of the University of Minnesota, was written under the direction of doctoral mentor, Charles W. Brydon, along with oral committee chair, Fielding founder Frederic M. Hudson.

Dr. Matusak has had a profound impact on people's lives around the world serving as a speaker, author, university president, and international leadership expert. She founded the College of Alternative Programs at the University of Evansville and, as one of the original board members of the Council for Adult Experiential Learning, promoted innovative concepts and trained thousands. Perhaps her biggest achievements were in the work she did at the W.K. Kellogg Foundation where she led international grant-making efforts and helped fund a generation of leadership programs worldwide. As Matusak is fond of saying, "Create the future! Leadership is everyone's responsibility." Her book, Finding Your Voice: Learning to Lead… Anywhere You Want to Make a Difference does just that, focusing on growing leadership in every individual. Her belief in individual acts of leadership led to the establishment of the Matusak Courageous Leadership Award, given by the Kellogg Fellows Leadership Alliance. The award recognizes individuals who have courageously and authentically spoke up when silence meant colluding with the problem. Roger Sublett, a former colleague at Kellogg and ILA board member, sums up her contributions well, "Wherever Dr. Matusak has served as a leader in higher education or philanthropy she has transformed organizations and people."

ILA_logoThe International Leadership Association (ILA) is the global network for all those who practice, study, and teach leadership. As part of the 10th Anniversary celebration in 2008, ILA began work on a new project that carries into both the future of the ILA and the future of leadership studies: The Leadership Legacy Project. The ILA inducts individuals from the field of leadership studies into the Legacy Project by presenting them with ILA's Lifetime Achievement Award at their annual global conference held in Barcelona, Spain in October 2016. Honorees are selected based on their significant and diverse contributions to the field of leadership.

Fielding Graduate University President Katrina Rogers, PhD, reflected, “Dr. Matusak exemplifies the vision of Fielding’s founder, Dr. Frederic Hudson, who argued that all of us could and would be called to leadership at some point in our lives. In this work, we as human beings need to be ready to engage in the world with forethought, wisdom, and scholarly knowledge. It is a pleasure to see her lifetime work honored in this way.”

Content reprinted and photo used with permission from ILA.

For more information about the ILA, please visit: www.ila-net.org

Tags: leadership, higher education, fielding graduate university, ILA, Frederic Hudson, katrina rogers