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Fielding Selected as a 2015 Best Value School Award Recipient

  
  
  
  
  
  

Fielding Graduate University has been selected out of nearly 8,000 postsecondary schools as the recipient of a Best Value School award.

Best Value Award 2015The award is issued by University Research & Review (URR) (https://www.urandr.org/about-us), a company dedicated to improving the process of how a student selects a postsecondary school.

“Given Fielding’s focus on providing affordable and personalized graduate education through our technologically-advanced face to face learning model, we are truly honored to receive the Best Value School award for a second consecutive year,” noted Fielding President Katrina Rogers, PhD.

President Rogers accepted the award on behalf of the university from URR founder Joseph Schmoke. "It is our distinguished pleasure to present the award to Fielding Graduate University," Schmoke states. "We hope current students and alumni take pride in this honor and anyone searching for a quality, reasonably priced college education strongly considers Fielding."

The committee that reviewed more than l00 nominees out of the thousands of eligible schools is made up of former university presidents, CEOs, provosts and professors. Schools cannot pay to receive the award; it has to be earned through the nomination and committee evaluation process. Fielding was chosen by the committee because it passed rigorous standards including a combination of cost, accreditation, variety and quality of school programs, and student satisfaction with the institution.

President Rogers added, “Here at Fielding, we hold ourselves to the highest educational standards to foster individual development, community collaboration and societal engagement. We are proud to be recognized for the true value we bring to our students’ educational careers.”

“Our committee prides itself on combining our extensive experience, knowledge of postsecondary education and insight into what provides students with good value when selecting a Best Value award recipient,” said Schmoke.

Fielding will retain the Best Value School designation for one year. Award recipients must re-qualify every year.

 URR medallion 2015BV medallion 2015

News Archive

Fourth Fielding Monograph Published: Leadership Studies in Healthcare

  
  
  
  
  
  

New research on leadership in healthcare is the focus of the latest edition of the ongoing monograph research series. 

Fielding monograph number 4 resized 600Titled “Leadership Studies in Healthcare,” this monograph is edited by Fielding Professor Marie Farrell, EdD, former visiting Professor at Harvard School of Public Health, who also served as program manager for nursing, midwifery, and social work for the World Health Organization (WHO).

This publication includes seven recent researches from outstanding Fielding’s School of Human Organizational Development (HOD) graduates. Paula Rowland, PhD, addresses hospital safety, a perennial concern, in her analysis of patient safety discourses in a Canadian hospital. Cheryl Nance, PhD, examines the impact of a year-long intervention program among hospital leadership, using Action Learning. Ellen Raboin, PhD, investigates phenomena of collaborative practice within a hospital’s healthcare team. Beth Houskamp examines certain transformational leadership practices of Clinical Nurse Leaders, based on her research in five inpatient units. 

Additionally, Maureen Gormley, PhD, chief operating officer of the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, addresses the ways in which attitudes towards individuals with intellectual disability (ID) were changed through an innovative program, Project Search. Cheryl Mitchell, PhD, studies the dynamics of blame in the highly charged environment of the healthcare workplace—a subject about which a clear lacuna exists in the literature. Stephen Redmon, PhD, concludes this monograph with an incisive inquiry into the experiences and effects on service-disabled veterans and their family members.

This Fielding monograph is now available worldwide on all of Amazon’s distribution channels here. An electronic version of the book, to be distributed by Apple iBooks, is in preparation. 

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Introduction to Leadership Studies in Healthcare:

Effective leadership is a vital component of any organization, and nowhere more so than in the healthcare sector. Increasingly, researchers and practitioners have begun to treat healthcare
organizations as uniquely complex systems, made up of diverse human constituencies and resources that rely on innovative leadership to not only function properly but also produce the best possible clinical care for patients and their families. This monograph explores some of the challenges of healthcare leadership in a time of ongoing reorganization and consolidation in the healthcare industry and the transformative changes in the wake of government-mandated health insurance.

Dr. Paula Rowland addresses hospital safety, a perennial concern, in her analysis of patient safety discourses in a Canadian hospital. She argues that, whereas traditionally patient safety has been seen at the intersection between complicated systems and fallible human agents, it might be reframed as a multi-dimensional issue drawing from sociological and organizational studies.

Dr. Cheryl Nance presents an approach to changing an organized delivery system’s culture. She examines the impact of a year-long intervention program among hospital leadership, using Action Learning, to manage the cultural transformation involved with opening of a new facility while remaining financially viable. Her research identifies significant differences among leaders across all departments in current and preferred culture types, and relates them to the factors deemed essential to the success of the system’s change.

Dr. Ellen Raboin’s research focuses on the phenomena of collaborative practice within a hospital’s healthcare team. She examines the factors considered as legitimate and important enablers of a successful working relationship within an interprofessional team, and shows the ways in which the team’s collaborative practices change over time in light of the presence of the patient and his or her family. Dr. Raboin uses methods from a communications perspective as well as from relational social constructionism.

Beth Houskamp turns our attention to the transformational leadership practices of Clinical Nurse Leaders, based on her research in five inpatient units. Her research indicates that, as a group, licensed personnel and those with advanced educational preparation perceived the transformational leadership practices of Clinical Nurse Leaders to be higher than did a group of unlicensed personnel and those with less education.

Dr. Maureen Gormley, the Chief Operating Officer of the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, addresses the ways in which attitudes towards individuals with intellectual disability (ID) were changed through an innovative program, Project Search, and how workplace stigma was experienced from the perspective of co-workers. Her findings suggest that participants who initially held negative perceptions related to the youths’ anticipated capabilities and behaviors overcame those perceptions by identifying the positive contributions that youth with ID made to the workplace.

Dr. Cheryl Mitchell studied the dynamics of blame in a highly charged environment of the healthcare workplace—a subject about which a clear lacuna exists in the literature. Her study of 17 senior healthcare leaders exposes the often corrosive effects of the “blame game” when “things go bad,” and how a positive, reinforcing, feedback loop can help counteract the damage of trying to allocate blame.

Dr. Stephen Redmon concludes this monograph with an incisive inquiry into the experiences and effects on service-disabled veterans and their family members of a unique Entrepreneurship Boot Camp for Veterans Family Program (EBV-F). This program was designed to support veterans experiencing discontinuous life transitions while strengthening their entrepreneurial skills. The data suggested that participants experienced the program as being truly transformative, by strengthening their self-perceptions and their situations, and by engaging them in new roles and relationships.

We would like to thank each of the authors for their important contributions to this monograph, while also expressing great appreciation to the members of our editorial board, who thoughtfully joined us in the peer review of this edition, including Drs. David Willis, Miguel Guilarte, Barbara Mink, and Stephen Murphy- Shigematsu. Great appreciation also goes to our wonderfully diligent editorial coordinator, Gwen DuBois-Wing, and our copy editor, Margaret Bonanno.
Our hope is that this edition of the Fielding monograph series will support a growing recognition of the preeminent role of leadership in healthcare systems, not only in American and international academia, but also as an extension of our pursuit of human wellbeing and the key role that the public and private sectors play therein.

MARIE FARRELL, HEALTHCARE LEADERSHIP EDITOR
JEAN-PIERRE ISBOUTS, MONOGRAPH SERIES EDITOR

 

 

 

 

News Archive

Psi Chi Chapter of Fielding Graduate University Raises $1,800 for Big Brothers Big Sisters

  
  
  
  
  
  

With only two weeks to fundraise, members, faculty and psychology students in the Psi Chi Chapter of Fielding Graduate University raised more than $1,800 for Big Brothers Big Sisters of Santa Barbara County.

By Melinda Johansson for the Family Service Agency |

Psi Chi check presentation Jan 2015 resized 600

This achievement, which includes a $500 match from Fielding Graduate University, sponsors a Big and Little match for one year.

“We are very thankful to Brothers Big Sisters of Santa Barbara County for all they do to support the emotional development of children,” said Jeanie Metivier, president of Fielding Graduate University Psi Chi Chapter. “We are thrilled to champion their work and appreciate Fielding Graduate University’s commitment and support of student organizations that make projects like this possible.”

Fielding Graduate University Psi Chi Chapter is a local chapter of Psi Chi, the International Honor Society in Psychology. The honor society is open to Fielding psychology students who have a 3.5 GPA or higher.

The mission of Psi Chi has several goals, one of which is to "promote ethical and socially responsible members and leaders." One way for members to learn social responsibility and leadership is through chapter service projects.

Big Brothers Big Sisters was selected as a service project for a few reasons, primarily because members had clinical or personal experiences with its programmatic results and wanted to support the emotional health and well-being of Santa Barbara County citizens.

Big Brothers Big Sisters is recognized as the single most effective prevention-based mentoring program in the United States. At-risk children ages 6 to 15 are carefully matched with caring adult mentors, who help them reach their full potential trough one-to-one relationships built on trust, friendship, consistency, support and guidance. In a recent national report titled The Mentoring Effect, it has been determined that young people who are mentored show improvements academically, socially and economically. These types of improvements are a direct result of the investment in our most valuable resource, our community’s children, which will lead to stronger and safer communities.

Locally, Big Brothers Big Sisters is a program of Family Service Agency.

— Melinda Johansson is the marketing manager for Family Service Agency.

Photo from left, Sean Whaley, Big Brother and Family Service Agency board member; Jeremy Jinkerson, vice president of the Psi Chi Chapter; Tiffany Duffing, secretary of the Psi Chi Chapter; David Edelman, vice president of advancement and development for Fielding Graduate University; April Harris-Britt, Ph.D., faculty sponsor for the Psi Chi Chapter, with daughter Aliyah Colin Lim, treasurer for the Psi Chi Chapter; and Jeanie Metivier, president of the Psi Chi Chapter. (Family Service Agency photo)


News Archive

NCA Announces Orlando L. Taylor Distinguished Scholarship Award

  
  
  
  
  
  

National Communication Association Establishes Distinguished Scholarship Award for Africana Communication in Honor of Association’s Past President Orlando Taylor

Released: 12-Mar-2015 10:30 AM EDT
Source Newsroom: National Communication Association
Newswise — WASHINGTON, DC (March 12, 2015)—The National Communication Association (NCA) announces the establishment of the Orlando L. Taylor Distinguished Scholarship Award in Africana Communication, named for the association’s 85th president, and the first African American to serve in that role.

“I am pleased that NCA has established an award to recognize such an important and consequential area of scholarship within our discipline, and I am especially pleased that it has been named for Orlando Taylor. Dr. Taylor has made significant contributions to the discipline of Communication and to our association over several decades. Significantly, he helped propel Communication to greater prominence in national higher education discussions during his tenure as the association’s first African-American president. I personally have great admiration for Dr. Taylor, and naming this award after him conveys well the stature of the award,” said NCA Executive Director Nancy Kidd.

The award will honor a scholar whose body of work demonstrates a sustained commitment to the study of African American and/or the African Diaspora communication and culture.

Orlando TaylorOrlando Taylor is Vice President for Strategic Initiatives and Research/Director of the Institute for Social Innovation at Fielding Graduate University. He is also a Senior Fellow at the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AACU). Headquartered in Fielding’s Washington, DC office, Dr. Taylor was the Founding President of the Washington, DC, campus of The Chicago School of Professional Psychology. Prior to these appointments, he spent more than 30 years at Howard University, where he was a Professor and also served in several senior leadership positions, including Dean of the School of Communications, Dean of the Graduate School, and Vice Provost for Research. “I am both humbled and honored to have the National Communication Association name this prestigious award in my honor,” Dr. Taylor said.

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About the National Communication Association
The National Communication Association (NCA) advances Communication as the discipline that studies all forms, modes, media, and consequences of communication through humanistic, social scientific, and aesthetic inquiry. NCA serves the scholars, teachers, and practitioners who are its members by enabling and supporting their professional interests in research and teaching. Dedicated to fostering and promoting free and ethical communication, NCA promotes the widespread appreciation of the importance of communication in public and private life, the application of competent communication to improve the quality of human life and relationships, and the use of knowledge about communication to solve human problems.

For more information, visit natcom.org, follow us on Twitter at @natcomm, and find us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/NationalCommunicationAssociation.News Archive

Fielding Announces Appointment of Gerald Porter, PhD, as Provost and Senior Vice President

  
  
  
  
  
  

Fielding Graduate University President Katrina Rogers, PhD, recently announced the appointment of Gerald Porter, PhD, to the position of provost and senior vice president.

Gerald Porter“On behalf of the students and faculty, I am pleased to welcome Gerald Porter to the Fielding community. With his experience in both psychology and education, he brings a critical cross-disciplinary outlook to the role of provost. We look forward to his leadership and guidance in the coming years to advance our mission to graduate adults prepared to create positive lasting change in the world,” said Rogers.

Porter comes to Fielding with an extensive background spanning both education and psychology, with an emphasis in curriculum and program development.

“My personal teaching and academic philosophy is completely consistent with Fielding’s distributive model of graduate education,” Porter stated, “For many years, I have had a personal and professional interest in alternative models of higher education, especially graduate and doctoral study.”

Graduate Education Curriculum and Program Development Expert

Prior to joining Fielding, Porter served as vice president of Academic Affairs and professor at Forest Institute in Springfield, MO. At Forest, he oversaw the APA reaccreditation of the doctoral program in Clinical Psychology, managed the implementation and accreditation of a new standalone master of arts in Marriage and Family Therapy, instituted embedded assessments as part of a new comprehensive examination model for the PsyD program in clinical psychology, implemented a new externship program in partnership with a major health service provider in southern Missouri, and introduced a quick admit recruitment program that increased master’s program admissions by over 30 percent.

From 2010-2011, Porter was responsible, in part, for the development of Apple Core, a childhood obesity prevention program, in partnership with Premera Blue Cross while serving as dean in the School of Natural Health Arts and Sciences at Bastyr University. He also created and chaired the university-wide Diversity Committee, chaired the Indigenous Studies Workgroup, and managed the planning and launch of an undergraduate program in integrated human biology.

As dean of the School of Education at the State University of New York at Cortland, Porter directed several major projects including the opening of a new school of Education complex, served as co-chair for the Cortland Professional Development School in partnership with the Cortland City School District. He established and served as chair of a new regional professional development school in Cortland with seven participating school districts, oversaw mini‐grant programs for faculty, P‐12 teachers, and school districts funded with Critic Teacher funds secured from the state, served as chair for the Physician’s Pedagogy Group to develop pedagogical skills training for medical school faculty, and served on the Advisory Board of the groundbreaking Cortland Urban Recruitment of Educators (CURE) program. 

While at SUNY Oswego, Porter’s responsibilities included collaborating with the graduate dean to finalize development of a credit-bearing graduate interdisciplinary certificate in gerontology, developing an accelerated master’s in counseling program, developing and teaching over ten new elective courses generating significant revenues, establishing a collaboration between the Department of Counseling and Psychological Services (CPS) and the International Center for the Study of Psychiatry and Psychology. He was instrumental in establishing an expressive arts sequence in the CPS Department, reorganized comprehensive examinations in master’s and Certificate of Advanced Studies programs, and developed master’s thesis alternatives in degree programs.

Social Justice Advocate

While employed as a program manager and trainer for the New York State Education Department, Porter helped to develop the Adolescent Vocational Exploration (AVE) and Structured Educational Support Programs (SESP). These statewide programs, implemented in partnership with regional service providers, prepared at-risk youth for high school completion, job readiness, and postsecondary education. Porter also contributed to the development of workshops and graduate coursework in gender and race equity for the New York State Sex Equity Technical Assistance and Resource Center. As director of client programming at the Columbia County ARC, Porter lead the development of all curriculum, including basic education, self-care, and recreation for developmentally disabled adults at the startup of a day treatment center.

Fielding in the Future

In a recent interview, Porter was asked about the future of Fielding. He stated, “As President Rogers advocates, we want to strengthen our existing programs, and diversify our offerings with targeted new programs that will respond to the emerging needs of our society in the 21st century, and enable adult learners who have been our traditional population, to grow, realize their self-chosen goals, and adapt more successfully to the changing environment. Fielding is well positioned to assume a leadership role in the more competitive and diverse academy that is emerging. We have a proven model based on a unique vision and understanding of adult focused higher education that has been tested over many years of practical experience. Fielding offers a viable model for adults who are embedded in the demands of life to pursue rigorous transformative graduate study while continuing to honor those life commitments. In this economically challenging time, this is what people desperately need: a pathway to personal and professional growth. Fielding has found a way, arguably the best way, to provide graduate and doctoral education to adults in the tumultuous new environment facing higher education. I am persuaded that our commitment to social justice informed by the necessary self-examination demanded by our transformational learning process will assure Fielding’s continuing success and relevance.”

Porter holds a PhD in educational psychology and statistics, Certificate of Advanced Studies (CAS) in the School of Psychology and an MS degree in educational psychology and statistics from the University at Albany, State University of New York. He is permanently certified in the School of Psychology in New York State and is a Certified Clinical Psychopathologist from the National Association of Forensic Counselors.

 

News Archive

Fielding Founder Frederic Hudson Passes Away

  
  
  
  
  
  

Fielding Founder Frederic Hudson Leaves a Lasting and Meaningful Impression in Higher Education

President Katrina Rogers, PhD, reflected on the passing of Frederic Hudson:

Hudson 1On February 9th, I received a call from Pam McLean that her spouse of many years, Dr. Frederic Hudson, had passed away with his family by his side. As so many of you know, Frederic was one of the Fielding’s founders and has always been characterized as a true visionary. Many of our faculty were hired directly by Frederic. As it happens, we have been writing a history of Fielding with the assistance of Keith Melville, HOD faculty member, who was hired by Frederic. Keith interviewed Pam in December with her son, and learned much more about Frederic’s life and work. We look forward to honoring his work through Fielding's history. Below is his full obituary as published in the Santa Barbara Independent.

(Santa Barbara Independent 2/25/15): Monday, February 9th, 2015, Frederic Hudson died at the age of 80 at home and surrounded by family in Santa Barbara after a long journey with Alzheimer’s disease. He leaves behind his wife, Pamela McLean and their three children, Christopher, Michael and Charles; and three children Jeffrey, John and Lisa along with their spouses and five grandchildren from his first marriage.

Dr. Hudson was a key visionary and Founding President of The Fielding Institute (now FieldingHudson 2 Graduate University), 1974-1986, one of the first blended learning institutions accredited in the U.S. In 1986 he transitioned from Fielding to establish The Hudson Institute of Santa Barbara (now The Hudson Institute of Coaching) – a learning organization focused on the intersection of development and change in the lives of leaders today.

A Rockefeller and Danforth Fellow, he earned his Master of Divinity in social ethics from Colgate Rochester Divinity School in 1959, and in 1968, his PhD in interdisciplinary studies (psychology, philosophy, and religion) from Columbia University. His research and dissertation studied a group of social activists working in NYC between 1890 and 1920. He was Associate Dean of Stephens College, Columbia, Missouri, 1961-64; Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Colby College, Waterville, Maine, 1964-69; Academic Dean and Professor of Philosophy at Lone Mountain College (now University of San Francisco), 1968-74. Dr. Hudson wrote The Adult Years (1992, revised 1999) Jossey-Bass Publishers. In 1996 he co-authored The Joy of Old, and with his partner, Pamela McLean, PhD, wrote LifeLaunch – A passionate guide to the rest of your life. In 2001 he wrote The Handbook of Coaching, an early and seminal book on what was then the emerging field of leadership coaching.

Frederic had many talents and passions including a lifelong love of his piano, writing, dancing, the game of tennis, the creativity of photography, the fun of birding and the mysteries of nature.

For those wishing to make contributions to commemorate his life and work, contributions can be made in honor of the life of Frederic Hudson to Fielding Graduate University’s Frederic Hudson Scholarship Fund, dedicated to promising doctoral students who would not otherwise have the means to pursue their learning goals. Fielding Graduate University, 2020 De La Vina Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93105. Notes and condolences may be sent to the family at: Hudson Institute, 41C Hitchcock Way, Santa Barbara, CA 93105

- See more at: http://www.independent.com/obituaries/2015/feb/17/frederick-hudson/#sthash.S1x0a1H3.dpuf (accessed 2/25/15)

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For more information about the Fredric Hudson Scholarship Fund, email giving@fielding.edu, or visit: http://giving.fielding.edu/.

News Archive

Fielding Announces Acquisition of Organization Systems Renewal Master’s Program

  
  
  
  
  
  

Fielding’s Master of Arts in Organizational Development and Leadership now offers students two unique delivery models

*PRESS RELEASE*

SANTA BARBARA, CA, FEBRUARY 26, 2015: Fielding Graduate University President Katrina Rogers, PhD, is pleased to announce the acquisition of the Organization Systems Renewal (OSR) master’s degree program. The OSR program is now being offered as a part of the Master of Arts in Organizational Development and Leadership (MA-ODL) program at Fielding Graduate University. On February 24, 2015, in Seattle, Washington, OSR and Fielding met to formally launch their agreement. Following the meeting, OSR and Fielding leadership, alumni, faculty and students gathered for an evening reception hosted by Fielding at The Mountaineers Program Center to publicly announce the new collaboration. “OSR and Fielding have followed a similar path in leading the field of organizational development, leadership, and change. We are honored that OSR has joined Fielding to continue our leadership together in promoting organizational effectiveness through systems change.” President Rogers said.

Fielding is headquartered in Santa Barbara, California, and was founded in 1974. A nonprofit leader in blended graduate education for over forty years, Fielding’s accreditation is maintained through the Accrediting Commission for Senior Colleges and Universities of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC). Fielding’s global, distributed community of professionals is dedicated to lifelong learning, social justice and innovation, and advancement for individuals, organizations, communities, and society. Fielding faculty members represent a breadth of scholarship and practice within the fields of clinical and media psychology, human and organizational development, and educational leadership.

The OSR program has conducted twenty cohorts in its 35-year history, boasting alumni presence in organizations such as Microsoft, Amazon, Starbucks, Boeing, Boys and Girls Clubs, the higher education sector as well as other private and non-profit organizations.

The OSR master’s degree program will be offered as a part of Fielding’s current MA-ODL program, which will now provide students with two unique delivery models. One model is the ODL~OSR Cohort allowing working professionals to obtain their degree through an in-depth learning experience that is highly collaborative and experiential. This model combines face-to-face interaction and online learning with faculty and peers who meet in Seattle and surrounding areas. Students complete online courses in the areas of leadership, design, group dynamics, and systems thinking, scheduled throughout five terms (20 months) beginning in the fall of each year. Students who complete this cohort model receive an emphasis in Organization Systems Renewal. The first ODL~OSR Cohort term begins in the fall of 2015.

The ODL~ Self-Directed is another model that allows working professionals who wish to achieve their educational goals by engaging with a diverse global community. This flexible model combines action inquiry, group engagement, and scholarship with praxis. The ODL~ Self-Directed model is a collaborative, in-depth learning experience with faculty and peers and includes two face-to-face residential sessions combined with online learning. Through full- or part-time participation, ODL~ Self-Directed can begin any fall, spring or summer term.

MA-ODL Program Director Marcella Benson-Quaziena, PhD, stated, “The two offerings coming together is a natural fit. The students are similar in their goals and desires, intellectual curiosity, heart and spirit.  The MA-ODL program is now comprised of two delivery models that reach a wide range of adult learners giving them a choice based on their engagement style, professional and personal commitments, and desire to integrate scholarship with practice.” 

For more information about Fielding Graduate University, please visit www.fielding.edu.

News Archive

Fielding's Social Justice Award Recognizes Fielder and Chouinard

  
  
  
  
  
  

Fielding Graduate University's Social Justice Award Recognizes the life work of Marie Fielder, PhD (posthumous) and Yvon Chouinard, founder and CEO of Patagonia.

During Fielding's annual Janaury Winter Session at the Fess Parker Doubletree Resort in Santa Barbara,CA, faculty, students, staff and alumni came together to recognize the social justice work of Fielder and Chouinard. The Social Justice Award was established in 1986 by psychology alumna Lynn Friedman Kessler to recognize demonstrated concern for and commitment to the furtherance of social justice. The award is granted through the Office of the President and demonstrative of one Fielding's core values focused on reducing the many forms of inequality.

Marie Fielder, PhD

Marie FielderFielder achieved national prominence as the first African American woman with a doctorate to teach in the San Francisco Bay Area, and for her theories that focused on how diverse cultures and groups relate to one another. Fielder was one of the first researchers to document cultural bias in IQ testing, and was instrumental in making the Berkeley public schools the first in the nation to desegregate through two-way busing.

In the 1960’s and 1970’s, Fielder contributed to the work of such civil rights leaders as Martin Luther King, Jr., and Whitney Young. She also advised numerous government and civil-rights organizations, including the U.S. Department of Education, the Black Panther Party for Defense and Justice, and the National Organization for Women. Fielder lectured, directed diversity forums, and conducted workshops and training for many school systems, government agencies and businesses across the United States.

Fielder worked with many kinds of people to help empower and enable them to solve their own problems. She inspired several generations of students at the three universities at which she held faculty appointments in California, many of whom went on to pursue highly successful careers.

As Congressman Ron Dellums said about her in 1995 when he acknowledged Fielder in the Congressional Record, she has been an exemplary public servant, bringing quiet dignity and distinction to every project on which she has worked.

Yvon Chouinard

Yvon Chouinard

Chouinard was born in Lewiston, Maine, in 1938, and raised in Southern California. There, as a teen he taught himself how to climb, surf, skin dive—and blacksmith. By the early 1970s when he founded Patagonia, Chouinard Equipment pitons, carabiners and ice axes had become the world standard.

Spending 140 days a year in the natural world, Chouinard learned early in his life as an alpinist, surfer and fly fisherman the seriousness of the environmental crisis—and he brought this knowledge to bear on his work. In the late 1980s he instituted Patagonia’s earth tax, pledging 1 percent of sales to the preservation and restoration of the natural environment.

In the 1990s, Chouinard encouraged Patagonia to consciously to reduce the environmental footprint of its products and activities, beginning with a 100 percent switch from conventional to organic cotton and the introduction of fleece clothing made from recycled polyester. He then sought to work with other partner companies to reduce environmental harm on a global scale. Chouinard, either independently, or with Patagonia helped co-found the Fair Labor Association, One Percent for the Planet, the Textile Exchange, the Conservation Alliance, and the Sustainable Apparel Coalition. In addition, Patagonia has been a B corp member since 2012.

Chouinard continues to surf and fly fish. He is the author or co-author of Climbing Ice, Let My People Go Surfing, The Responsible Company and Simple Fly Fishing.

President Katrina Rogers and Vice President of Strategic Initiatives and Research, Orlando Taylor, PhD, took stage in front of a packed house to introduce the outstanding work of the recipients.

Nicola Smith, MBA, JD, daughter of Fielder, shared some inspiring words about her mother’s work, as she accepted her award posthumously. She encouraged today and tomorrow’s scholar to exemplify Fielding’s values by leading the way in the social justice field.

Social justice award nicola yvon katrina resized 600Highlights of the evening also included a question and answer session with Chouinard after he introduced his company values and goals. Chouinard enthusiastically shared personal insights to his life and business vision. The discussion addressed topics such as his work to promote a more sustainable retail industry that educates consumers, his ongoing commitment to choose international supplier with safe and fair practices and his efforts to offer an innovative and equitable working environment to his employees. As the evening closed, the energy in the room was contagious after what had proved to be a lively and informative award ceremony.

 

News Archive

Fielding Awarded the Carnegie Community Engagement Classification

  
  
  
  
  
  

Fielding Graduate University Awarded the Carnegie Foundation Advancement of Teaching for Community Engagement Classification

The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching has selected Fielding Graduate University as one of 240 U.S. colleges and universities to receive its 2015 Community Engagement Classification.

Carnegie CEC digital seal resized 600Colleges and universities with an institutional focus on community engagement were invited to apply for the classification, first offered in 2006 as part of an extensive restructuring of The Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. Unlike the Foundation’s other classifications that rely on national data, this is an “elective” classification—institutions participated voluntarily by submitting required materials describing the nature and extent of their engagement with the community, be it local or beyond. This approach enabled the Foundation to address elements of institutional mission and distinctiveness that are not represented in the national data on colleges and universities. “The importance of this elective classification is borne out by the response of so many campuses that have demonstrated their deep engagement with local, regional, national, and global communities,” said John Saltmarsh, director of the New England Resource Center for Higher Education (NERCHE). “These are campuses that are improving teaching and learning, producing research that makes a difference in communities, and revitalizing their civic and academic missions.”

Fielding President Katrina Rogers, PhD, noted, “Our leadership sees community engagement as one of the key values of the institution. It is reflected in our strategic plan and the ways in which Fielding manifests community engagement through its mission and educational enterprise. We define community engagement as the actions that we take as an institution and through our graduates to create positive social change using the best research and practice. Our stated values support community engagement in various ways, emphasizing community building internally and externally, diversity, learner-centered education, social justice, and transformational learning.”

Fielding Graduate University was founded in 1974 as an independent non-profit graduate school, dedicated to learning for experienced, mid-career adults. Fielding’s student population consists of 1,200 with 130 faculty members all across the United States. Long before the internet, Fielding invented a pedagogical model that enabled individuals to participate in high quality graduate learning from a distance and in small groups in their communities. Fielding’s vision then and now is based on the notion that adults deserve access to graduate learning that they can apply in their communities as they study, and not only when they finish. From the beginning, Fielding expected its students to be engaged in their communities, taking from their educational experience the more relevant theories to address local issues.

Fielding’s vision for their students role in community engagement is two-fold: 1) to build a high level of knowledge and skills for their graduates to be effective in collaboration and change work; and 2) to enact through their centers and curricula the multiple ways in which Fielding can make a contribution to society. Fielding’s community engagement-focused efforts are most apparent within Fielding’s Institute for Social Innovation (ISI). The ISI’s mission and function is to turn knowledge into action for the workplace and local communities. The programs currently under the ISI include: the Women’s Network for Gender Empowerment, the Nonprofit Leadership Certificate, the World Cafe, and Evidence-Based Coaching certificates. The ISI’s Center for Public Life, is funded by a grant from the Kettering Foundation to support the Center’s services to local non-profits in the central coast region of California.

The Foundation, through the work of the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education, developed the first typology of American colleges and universities in 1970 as a research tool to describe and represent the diversity of U.S. higher education. The Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education (now housed at Indiana University Bloomington's Center for Postsecondary Research) continues to be used for a wide range of purposes by academic researchers, institutional personnel, policymakers and others.

A listing of the institutions that hold the Community Engagement Classification can be found on NERCHE’s website.

News Archive

Fielding Introduces New Program at the ICDL Conference in Boston

  
  
  
  
  
  

Fielding Graduate University Introduces New Infant and Early Childhood Development (IECD) PhD program to 200 members of Interdisciplinary Council on Development and Learning (ICDL)

President Katrina Rogers, PhD, along with School of Educational Leadership for Change (ELC) Program Director Kathy Tiner, PhD, ELC faculty member Jenny Edwards, PhD, psychology faculty ICDL Conference 2member Debra Bendell, PhD, adjunct faculty and Program Leader, Infant and Early Childhood Development (IECD) Ira Glovinsky, PhD, and Admissions Advisor Bob Harriman attended the (ICDL) Conference in November in Boston, MA. President Rogers introduced Fielding and the new Infant and Early Childhood Development (IECD) PhD program to 200 members of ICDL. ICDL is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to redefining and promoting each child’s development to their fullest potential (www.icdl.com). Fifteen Fielding IECD students were present and the following three students presented their graduate work: Melissa Grosvenor, Carrie Alvarado, and Sara McMahan. IECD ICDL Conference 1faculty Ira Glovinsky opened the session with a keynote presentation entitled "Emotions and Mood Dysregulation in Infants and Toddlers: The Neuroscience of Moods Including the Dyadic Transactions that Lead to Positive and Negative Moods." The conference was a huge success and Fielding’s presence was greatly appreciated.

Pictured in the top left photo:Fielding IECD students Cheryl Rock and Julie Sealy Directors of the Sunshine Stimulation Centre in Barbados
Pictured in the lower right photo: Carrie Alvarado and Melissa Grosvenor
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