Fielding Graduate University News

Dreams of Fielding: New England Cluster Celebrates 13 Years

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Thu, Mar 13, 2014

 Helping People Change Through Dreamwork

The New England cluster celebrated thirteen years of gatherings by inviting Alice Kitchel (HOD '12) and Beth Scanzani of Dream Coach of Rockport, MA, to speak to the group about dreamwork. Special guest President Katrina Rogers also attended to discuss dreaming of Fielding's future.

Reported by Jim Webber, PhD (HOD '03)

President Rogers bonew england visitwled us over on her visit to the Fielding New England alumni group on Saturday, February 8, in Gloucester, MA. The view from host Rick Maybury’s (HOD '12) office on the waterfront was spectacular and snow-free for a change.

Present were HOD folks: Carolyn Slocombe, Kathleen Healey, Alice Kitchel, Peg Murphy, Rick Maybury, Jim Goebelbecker, Jim Webber, Leo Johnson (emeritus) and special guest Beth Scanzani.

Katrina presented her ideas and directions for raising the value of Fielding Graduate University, in other words in building our brand. Our core identity is centered on mentored transformational learning, relational learning, life-long learning, and value based education. Fielding stands for innovation in graduate education. We need to embrace new ways of thinking. Because the world needs us we must think in terms of global social systems and the future of the earth.

Change Through Dreamwork

"Dreams do work so get to work on your dreams" urged practitioners Alice Kitchel and Beth Scanzani. Dreams help us solve problems and preview future challenges. Dreams serve as a magic mirror, a secret laboratory and a creative studio. Our brain has two operating systems, one for “reality,” one for our own unfolding dreamscape. In waking life, we combine letters and words to form sentences. In dreams we combine images to spell-out associations and create a story or even a nightmare. Dreams are like having a resident life coach who knows you from inside out.

To learn from a dream you must engage with it. The process of successful “dream catching” includes: creating a record, writing the story in present tense, giving it a title, drawing-out connections, applying dream work tools and looking for themes, surprises and limiting beliefs. 

To apply this learning, we used the projective team process on a brave cluster mate’s dream. First the dreamer gave the dream a title and second she told the dream. In the third step the group asks clarifying questions followed by their own “hits,” projections and associations answering the question, “If this were my dream.” Finally the dreamer shares her hits and reactions and decides how she would like to honor the dream.

Dream we must!

Rick Maybury’s message to Katrina following the visit:

I want to thank you from all of our alums for your thoughtful and enriching visit. We are all pleased that you took the time and energy to join us and your interactions could not have been more authentic or inspiring. As I had mentioned in the meeting, it is refreshing and provides hope that the President is finally having what most of us believe to be the right conversation.

Your presentation on the state of the state, including your vision, was well balanced with reality and hope. The group also felt you authentically listened to our perspectives which would be sincerely considered in your future leadership decisions. As I hope you gathered, there are no more dedicated, passionate and devoted to the spirit of Fielding and it potential to have profound transformational impacts on its students.

Tags: Organizational development, higher education, fielding graduate university, human development