Fielding Graduate University News

Fourth Fielding Monograph Published: Leadership Studies in Healthcare

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Thu, May 14, 2015

New research on leadership in healthcare is the focus of the latest edition of the ongoing monograph research series. 

Fielding monograph number 4 resized 600Titled “Leadership Studies in Healthcare,” this monograph is edited by Fielding Professor Marie Farrell, EdD, former visiting Professor at Harvard School of Public Health, who also served as program manager for nursing, midwifery, and social work for the World Health Organization (WHO).

This publication includes seven recent researches from outstanding Fielding’s School of Human Organizational Development (HOD) graduates. Paula Rowland, PhD, addresses hospital safety, a perennial concern, in her analysis of patient safety discourses in a Canadian hospital. Cheryl Nance, PhD, examines the impact of a year-long intervention program among hospital leadership, using Action Learning. Ellen Raboin, PhD, investigates phenomena of collaborative practice within a hospital’s healthcare team. Beth Houskamp examines certain transformational leadership practices of Clinical Nurse Leaders, based on her research in five inpatient units. 

Additionally, Maureen Gormley, PhD, chief operating officer of the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, addresses the ways in which attitudes towards individuals with intellectual disability (ID) were changed through an innovative program, Project Search. Cheryl Mitchell, PhD, studies the dynamics of blame in the highly charged environment of the healthcare workplace—a subject about which a clear lacuna exists in the literature. Stephen Redmon, PhD, concludes this monograph with an incisive inquiry into the experiences and effects on service-disabled veterans and their family members.

This Fielding monograph is now available worldwide on all of Amazon’s distribution channels here. An electronic version of the book, to be distributed by Apple iBooks, is in preparation. 

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Introduction to Leadership Studies in Healthcare:

Effective leadership is a vital component of any organization, and nowhere more so than in the healthcare sector. Increasingly, researchers and practitioners have begun to treat healthcare
organizations as uniquely complex systems, made up of diverse human constituencies and resources that rely on innovative leadership to not only function properly but also produce the best possible clinical care for patients and their families. This monograph explores some of the challenges of healthcare leadership in a time of ongoing reorganization and consolidation in the healthcare industry and the transformative changes in the wake of government-mandated health insurance.

Dr. Paula Rowland addresses hospital safety, a perennial concern, in her analysis of patient safety discourses in a Canadian hospital. She argues that, whereas traditionally patient safety has been seen at the intersection between complicated systems and fallible human agents, it might be reframed as a multi-dimensional issue drawing from sociological and organizational studies.

Dr. Cheryl Nance presents an approach to changing an organized delivery system’s culture. She examines the impact of a year-long intervention program among hospital leadership, using Action Learning, to manage the cultural transformation involved with opening of a new facility while remaining financially viable. Her research identifies significant differences among leaders across all departments in current and preferred culture types, and relates them to the factors deemed essential to the success of the system’s change.

Dr. Ellen Raboin’s research focuses on the phenomena of collaborative practice within a hospital’s healthcare team. She examines the factors considered as legitimate and important enablers of a successful working relationship within an interprofessional team, and shows the ways in which the team’s collaborative practices change over time in light of the presence of the patient and his or her family. Dr. Raboin uses methods from a communications perspective as well as from relational social constructionism.

Beth Houskamp turns our attention to the transformational leadership practices of Clinical Nurse Leaders, based on her research in five inpatient units. Her research indicates that, as a group, licensed personnel and those with advanced educational preparation perceived the transformational leadership practices of Clinical Nurse Leaders to be higher than did a group of unlicensed personnel and those with less education.

Dr. Maureen Gormley, the Chief Operating Officer of the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, addresses the ways in which attitudes towards individuals with intellectual disability (ID) were changed through an innovative program, Project Search, and how workplace stigma was experienced from the perspective of co-workers. Her findings suggest that participants who initially held negative perceptions related to the youths’ anticipated capabilities and behaviors overcame those perceptions by identifying the positive contributions that youth with ID made to the workplace.

Dr. Cheryl Mitchell studied the dynamics of blame in a highly charged environment of the healthcare workplace—a subject about which a clear lacuna exists in the literature. Her study of 17 senior healthcare leaders exposes the often corrosive effects of the “blame game” when “things go bad,” and how a positive, reinforcing, feedback loop can help counteract the damage of trying to allocate blame.

Dr. Stephen Redmon concludes this monograph with an incisive inquiry into the experiences and effects on service-disabled veterans and their family members of a unique Entrepreneurship Boot Camp for Veterans Family Program (EBV-F). This program was designed to support veterans experiencing discontinuous life transitions while strengthening their entrepreneurial skills. The data suggested that participants experienced the program as being truly transformative, by strengthening their self-perceptions and their situations, and by engaging them in new roles and relationships.

We would like to thank each of the authors for their important contributions to this monograph, while also expressing great appreciation to the members of our editorial board, who thoughtfully joined us in the peer review of this edition, including Drs. David Willis, Miguel Guilarte, Barbara Mink, and Stephen Murphy- Shigematsu. Great appreciation also goes to our wonderfully diligent editorial coordinator, Gwen DuBois-Wing, and our copy editor, Margaret Bonanno.
Our hope is that this edition of the Fielding monograph series will support a growing recognition of the preeminent role of leadership in healthcare systems, not only in American and international academia, but also as an extension of our pursuit of human wellbeing and the key role that the public and private sectors play therein.

MARIE FARRELL, HEALTHCARE LEADERSHIP EDITOR
JEAN-PIERRE ISBOUTS, MONOGRAPH SERIES EDITOR

 

 

 

 

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