Fielding Graduate University News

Save the Dates:Rocky Mountain Virtual Research Retreat, Nov 2-3, 2013

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Mon, Oct 21, 2013

Fielding Graduate University is Pleased to Announce the Annual Rocky Mountain Virtual Research Retreat 

RMVRR Save the Date Nov 2 3 2013

Learn valuable research skills via GoToMeeting!

Click here to download the full program and sign in information.

Who Can Attend?  ELC, HOD, and SoP Students, Faculty, Alumni, and Prospects  

Questions? Please email Jenny Edwards (jedwards@fielding.edu).

Session 1—Saturday, Nov. 2, 2013

Research Design - Mark Scanlon-Greene, ELC Faculty
In this session, we will examine the process of turning our ideas into a research study.  We will look at matching the questions we hope our study will answer or the phenomena we want to better understand to the research method(s) that are the best fit for our needs.  The session will begin with an overview of research methods, and then we will see how we can determine which method (or combination of methods) is best for our dissertation.  Appointments can also be scheduled for individual consultation after the session.


Decolonizing Epistemologies and Methodologies - Margo Okazawa-Rey, HOD Faculty
How do you know what you know? What is “real” knowledge? How has research been employed for both colonial and liberatory projects? We will explore these questions and more during this session through conversation about key concepts and principles that challenge and provide alternatives to positivist perspectives and values about ways of knowing and research.


Perspectives on Narrative Approaches to Research on Trauma 
Connie Corley, PhD, Bart Buechner, MA, & Zieva Konvisser, PhD, School of HOD
Based on the work of three researchers who have studied Holocaust survivors, war veterans, and survivors of terrorism, this presentation will address the following:
1.  Overview of narrative research and trauma, including theoretical perspectives;
2.  Narrative research methods—what are they and how used with other cultures of inquiry (e.g., CMM, phenomenology, quantitative survey research); and
3.  Role of narrative as therapy—prospects for healing.


Research in Media and Social Change - Jean-Pierre Isbouts, Media Psychology Faculty
Jean-Pierre will provide an overview of qualitative research with a focus on hermeneutics, text criticism, and oral inquiry as they pertain to media artifacts. He believes that it is not possible to analyze human creativity, including media and artifacts, by purely statistical means. Ergo, any doctoral student who wishes to look at the interaction of individuals or communities with media or creative expression in whatever form will need to penetrate the motives and Gestaltung behind the origination of such artifacts, which statistical instruments alone cannot accomplish.


Analyzing Quantitative Data with IBM Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS): Part One - Jenny Edwards, ELC Faculty
In this seminar, you will learn how to:
· Set up a codebook
· Enter data into SPSS
· Ensure that the data have been entered correctly
· Run descriptive statistics
· Manipulate the data
Prior to the seminar, please download the trial version from www.spss.com. It will last for two weeks.


Using Indigenous Research Methodology: Perspectives and Values for YOUR Research Project (Even if it is not about Indigenous Peoples) - Four Arrows, ELC Faculty
This seminar will introduce students to ways the growing field of Indigenous Research Methodology can enhance your work as a doctoral student interested in significant change agentry in education and in the world at large, especially that which engages social/ecological justice and diversity issues. Topics covered will include rethinking the purpose of the dissertation; focusing on how knowledge is legitimized; creating new levels of insight; understanding alternative ways of knowing and research; and ending colonizing and oppressive assumptions.
Recommended Reading:
Teaching Truly: A Curriculum to Indigenize Mainstream Education
The Authentic Dissertation: Alternative Ways of Knowing, Research and Representation


Critiquing a Peer-reviewed Research Article- Marie Farrell, HOD Faculty
In this session, we will take two typical articles found in peer-reviewed journals in Human and Organizational Development. One will focus on a qualitative descriptive study, the other on an empirical study. The two articles will be posted in advance to allow for participants to familiarize themselves with the topic and the elements the researchers include.

Session 2—Saturday, Nov. 2, 2013

Advanced Library Research Methods - Elizabeth Borghi, Instruction and Reference Librarian
This session will provide you with the techniques required to be a more independent and skilled researcher in the library. Specifically, you will learn how to conduct advanced searches in FASTSearch; how to conduct in-depth research in individual databases using tools like Boolean operators, limiters, thesauri, and subject terms; and how to construct a research strategy. We will also cover basics on how to use EndNote to manage your citations and bibliographies. If you have any research questions or topics you’d like us to demonstrate at the session, please email them to library@fielding.edu before November 1. 


Writing An Action Research Dissertation - Rodney Beaulieu, ELC Faculty
In this session, we will review some possible ways to frame and organize an action research dissertation, following a traditional five-chapter format: introduction, literature review, research methods, research findings, and discussion.  


Research Design - Mark Scanlon-Greene, ELC Faculty
In this session, we will examine the process of turning our ideas into a research study.  We will look at matching the questions we hope our study will answer or the phenomena we want to better understand to the research method(s) that are the best fit for our needs.  The session will begin with an overview of research methods, and then we will see how we can determine which method (or combination of methods) is best for our dissertation.  Appointments can also be scheduled for individual consultation after the session.


Writing a Grant to Fund Your Dissertation Research - Barbara Freeman, ELC Alumna
The aim of this presentation is to help participants write a winning grant proposal to help fund their dissertation research. Over the past decade, Dr. Barbara Freeman, the session facilitator, has raised close to $10 million to fund the research and development of her digital educational interventions for K-12 students. In this session, she will share specific strategies that can improve one’s probability of success. Participants will gain an understanding of how to identify funding organizations that may take a genuine interest in their research proposal. They will also learn how to make a compelling argument regarding the significance of their work, clearly articulate the research basis of their work, and ensure consistency between the core of their dissertation and research plan. Using an interactive case study approach, we will explore issues, including defining the research question, selecting the appropriate research design and data analysis methodology, assessing learning outcomes and performance measures, employing formative and summative evaluation techniques, and ensuring fidelity of implementation.


Analyzing Quantitative Data with IBM Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS): Part Two - Jenny Edwards, ELC Faculty
In this seminar, you will learn how to:
· Choose the correct statistical procedure to use
· Use graphs to describe and explore the data
· Check assumptions for the various statistical procedures that we will be covering
· Run correlations and partial correlations
· Run Chi-Square
· Run inferential statistics such as paired-samples t-tests, independent samples t-tests, and one-way Analysis of Variance
Prior to the seminar, please download the trial version from www.spss.com. It will be good for two weeks.


Zotero and Other Aps to Make Writing Easier - Jennifer Frank, ELC Alumna
Learn to use Zotero for organizing your references for classes and the dissertation, as well as other apps for writing.
 
Special SUNDAY Global Pre-Session Event Sunday, Nov. 3

7 am-9 am Pacific / 8 am-10 am Mountain / 9 am-11 am Central / 10 am-12 noon Eastern / 3 pm-5 pm UK Greenwich / 4 pm-6pm Europe / 11pm-1 am China

Spirit and Work–Research and Practice -with Pauline Albert, Lenneal Henderson, Rick Moody, Stephen Murphy-Shigematsu, and David Blake Willis 

How do we make better social worlds by bringing our spiritual selves to our work and research? We draw on the wisdom of Saints Francis and Clare of Assisi, Confucius, Rumi, and Krishna, as well as contemporaries such as Barnett Pierce, Charlie Seashore, Marshall Ganz, Edward Said, and others as we discuss how to do research that brings a spiritual dimension into our work along with traditional analytical approaches. We engage in learning how CMM, use of self, and public narratives can be useful in integrating our inner lives into our actions in the world. Welcome to our exploration of bringing spiritual dimensions to our work and research!!

Session 3—Sunday, Nov. 3, 2013

Evaluating Scholarly Literature - Leila González Sullivan, ELC Faculty
In this session, students will learn the purpose of a literature review in the context of a scholarly paper or their chosen dissertation topic and review the components of an article that should be evaluated before including the article in a paper.  They will analyze selected articles, examine reference lists for leads to other articles and discuss the proper structure for a literature review. Applications to the students’ dissertation work will be emphasized throughout.


Focus Groups: Organizing, Conducting, and Analyzing - Kathy Tiner, ELC Faculty
This session will be an introduction to the use of Focus Group Interviews as a data collection tool.  Included in this interactive session will be information on the following:
· Why Focus Groups?
· Practical tasks using focus groups
· Developing questions for focus groups
· Facilitating focus groups
· Analyzing and reporting focus group results


Ethical Perspectives on Doing Research Outside the US - Margo Okazawa-Rey, HOD Faculty
What happens when “Americans” conduct research outside US culture, languages, and ways of being and doing? We will explore this overarching question with emphasis on ethics and ethical dilemmas.


Understanding the IRB Process - Mike Meraz, IRB Administrator and Jenny Edwards,
ELC IRB Member
The Institutional Review Board (IRB) is a committee charged with the oversight of all research with human subjects conducted at Fielding to ensure that the rights of participants are adequately protected.  The IRB Administrator (Mike Meraz) and IRB Member (Jenny Edwards) will offer a brief overview of Research Ethics and clarify the role the IRB plays in the dissertation process.  Students will be provided with a comprehensive description of the IRB process from submission through the closing of their study. If you have questions about the IRB, email irb@fielding.edu.


Writing Outside of Pages and Word: Using Non-Linear Tools to Research, Write, and Collaborate - Gigi Johnson, ELC Alumna
Programs like Word and Pages often lock us into linear metaphors of work.  In Word, we can use the Reference tool to see an outline down the left side, but that tends to be the level of iterative connection it brings. There are other ways to connect and create new combinations with our long-term work. We will focus on EverNote, Scrivener, and other visualization tools to work on writing and research in image-driven settings, as well as concept maps and iPad-based apps.  We will examine how we can gather research over the long haul, connect our work together in new ways, and use these tools as group tools to collaborate with other scholar/practitioners.  We will look at not just how to gather ideas for dissertations, but how to start gathering ideas together earlier in KAs and other professional work for long-term research and writing flow.


Charting the Course for a Smooth Doctoral Journey - Kay Hensler Phelps, ELC Alumna
Join ELC alumna, Dr. Kay Phelps, for a roundtable session on practical tips and support that will enhance your doctoral journey. Topics include:
• A search focus with the studies
• Arranging for focus groups and interviews
• Preparing for the Institutional Review Board
• Managing work, research, and family and...
• Taking care of yourself in the process!


Fill in the Blanks for a Strong Academic Paper - Jennifer Frank, ELC Alumna
Well-written academic papers follow a format that easily conveys your ideas to the reader. The problem is that most writers either don't know or don't follow that format. Jennifer Frank is an ELC graduate who works as a writing tutor and instructor. In this presentation, you will learn the basic structure that works for everything from a five-paragraph essay to a full-length dissertation. When you approach academic papers using this common framework, all you have to do is fill in the blanks with your ideas.
 

Session 4—Sunday, Nov. 3, 2013

Using Venn Diagrams - Anna DiStefano, ELC Faculty
In this seminar, we will play with Venn diagrams as a way of organizing our thinking about a research question.  Using Venn diagrams can help us clarify the relationships among key concepts.  We can then use that clarity to organize a review of the literature more powerfully to make an argument.  On my sign-up site are two light-hearted examples of Venn diagrams.  Please also read the article by John Clarke before the seminar and, if possible, sketch out a Venn diagram or two about a research topic of interest to you.  While I will present a few key ideas at the beginning of the seminar, we will spend most of the time playing around with possible ways of organizing your ideas.


Research Design Basics, Correlation and Factor Analytic Basics, and Visual Presentation of Data - David Peterzell, SoP Faculty
Research Design Basics (45 minutes) will introduce the scientific method (problem, design, analysis, publication), and research methodologies (descriptive, correlational, experimental). Correlation and Factor Analytic Basics (45 minutes) will provide a simple, intuitive, non-computational introduction using individual differences data from my own research.  
Visual Presentation of Data (15 minutes) will provide simple tips for using graphs from the beginning to end of a research project. 


Writing Outside of Pages and Word: Using Non-Linear Tools to Research, Write, and Collaborate - Gigi Johnson, ELC Alumna
Programs like Word and Pages often lock us into linear metaphors of work.  In Word, we can use the Reference tool to see an outline down the left side, but that tends to be the level of iterative connection it brings.  There are other ways to connect and create new combinations with our long-term work. We will focus on EverNote, Scrivener, and other visualization tools to work on writing and research in image-driven settings, as well as concept maps and iPad-based apps.  We will examine how we can gather research over the long haul, connect our work together in new ways, and use these tools as group tools to collaborate with other scholar/practitioners.  We will look at not just how to gather ideas for dissertations, but how to start gathering ideas together earlier in KAs and other professional work for long-term research and writing flow.
 
Research in Virtual Environments: Challenges and Results - S. Mackenzie Glander-Dolo, HOD Alum
This session will critically analyze doing research in virtual environments using a Trust study in Second Life as an example. Recent studies indicate that emails and Twitter elicit mean and angry responses (Brennan & Ohaeri, 1999; Rui Fan, Jichang Zhao, Yan Chen, Ke Xu, 2013) more than any other emotion. These are generally asynchronous communication, so the question arises whether or not synchronous virtual environments are also impacted and impacting business and personal relationships. Using participants in Second Life (SL), this study looks particularly at trust relationships using mixed methods: a tool called Virtual Environment Interpersonal Trust Scale and interviews. Initial results and challenges along with a compilation of previous SL research will be reported. Students are welcome to send discussion questions ahead of time. Please send questions to mackenzie.glander@gmail.com.  


Fielding’s First Collaborative Dissertation:  1 + 1 = 3 with Mary Ann Burke, ELC Alumna and Kathy Norwood, ELC Alumna and EBC Faculty
Mary Ann and Kathy have just completed the first collaborative dissertation in the history of Fielding Graduate University. They will be giving an inside look at how this pioneering effort unfolded.  From its inception through the final product, they will talk about the benefits and potential pitfalls in undertaking a collaborative dissertation. Be prepared to “think outside the box” as they expand the horizons on dissertation possibilities. 
 
Analyzing Qualitative Data with the ATLAS.ti Qualitative Data Analysis Software Program - Jenny Edwards, ELC Faculty
Participants will learn to do the following tasks in the ATLAS.ti qualitative data analysis software program:
· Entering data
· Coding data
· Creating families of primary documents and codes
· Writing memos
· Producing output
· Creating networks
· Running searches using the Query Tool
· And many other tasks!
 

Click here to download the full program and sign in information.

Questions? email Jenny Edwards (jedwards@fielding.edu).


 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Tags: educational leadership, organizational change, qualitative research, fielding graduate university, research