Points of Pride

Media Psych Students Talk Social Responsibility with grubHub

Posted on Tue, Jan 26, 2016

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Students Monica Helms, Colleen Cleveland and Adam Baldowski brought their Media Psych skills to Chicago to work with grubHub on corporate social responsibility.

By Adam Baldowski

It all started at Winter Session 2014, with a white page, a company name, and a can-do attitude. We were tasked to create a Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) presentation for a company based out of Chicago. The company was grubHub, and we hit the ground running, discussing general ideas with a company liaison.

There were four of us in the group: Monica Helms, Colleen Cleveland, and I formed the student contingent, while Dr. Janet De Merode led the charge as our faculty mentor. We didn’t know it at the time, but the CSRproject would be one of the hardest, yet most fun experiences we would have during our time at Fielding.

Each of us brought a skill and prior knowledge from our own personal and professional experience to the group. For me this was the perfect marriage between my personal, professional, and academic lives because I was able to utilize prior knowledge of the design world and understanding client needs, while the Media Psychology program allowed us to bring a psychological perspective to the overall initiative.

We decided to remove the academic side of the presentation initially in order to focus on the brand we were working with. As students we would need to explain our choices and tie in our research to concepts we were learning—but as designers our focus needed to begin with two questions: Who is grubHub? What are they looking for in a Corporate Social Responsibility project?

From here we were able to fold in psychological theories on philanthropy and CSR initiatives currently in practice. This proved to be a harder task than we had originally thought, strictly because the client wants what they want, and most clients don’t want to spend too much money to get there. As a designer, this approach can be frustrating, but as a media psychologist, this set up an interesting challenge because we weren’t just showcasing our design skills, we were trying to get the client to understand why CSR is important and how perception can play a role in customer engagement and longevity.

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Colleen Cleveland, Adam Baldowski, grubHub liaison Cat de Merode, and Monica Helms on the roof of the Chicago grubHub offices.

Our team had not only grown academically through the many research sessions and online meetings we would have, but we also grew closer as friends. Our CSR project succeeded on a professional level because grubHub implemented some of the ideas presented to them shortly after the project concluded. But the project also succeeded by showing us, and hopefully others, why Fielding and the Media Psychology program is a cut above the rest.

Yes, media was used to gather for sessions, research ideas, and present material, but media also helped bring together a team of equals who put the client and the project above the needs of the individual. Our team connected online while many of us were in other parts of the country, at home with kids, and even in the hospital, yet we never missed a beat. GrubHub is an online company that uses online tools to connect with customers—and we used online tools to connect with our client and, more importantly, with each other.

This is why I am proud of what our team accomplished. We weren’t concerned with how we would look as individuals. Instead we wanted to create a campaign for a growing company and foster a relationship for Fielding. In business, it’s all about relationships. We formed a strong personal bond within our team and a professional relationship with grubHub and our liaison. We hope that others after us will work on future CSR projects to not only learn from each other but to further show that Fielding is a place where change can happen.

Tags: Media psychology, Corporate social responsibility

Latest Books from Faculty, Students, and Alumni, Fall 2015

Posted on Wed, Sep 23, 2015

The following books were recently released for publication. 

Comm-Military

A Communication Perspective on the Military 
by Michelle Still Mehta, PhD (Human and Organizational Systems alumna) 

This book reflects upon the ways the meaning of war is communicated in private lives, social relations, and public affairs. It focuses on three broad areas of concern: communication in the military family; the military in the media; and rhetoric surrounding the military. Michelle co-authored Chapter 7, "Work/Family Predicaments of Air Force Wives: A Sensemaking Perspective."

 

The Wiley Blackwell Handbook of Psychology, Technology and Society, co-edited by Nancy Cheever, PhD (Media Psychology alumna)

Edited by three of the world's leading authorities on the psychology of technology, including media psychology alumna Nancy Cheever, this new handbook provides a thoughtful and evidence-driven examination of contemporary technology's impact on society and human behavior.

CheeverThe book reaches beyond the more established study of psychology and the Internet, to include varied analysis of a range of technologies, including video games, smart phones, tablet computing, etc. It provides analysis of the latest research on generational differences, Internet literacy, cyberbullying, sexting, Internet and cell phone dependency, and online risky behavior.

 

Successful Onboarding: A New Lens for Mid-Career Leaders by Louise Korver (Evidence Based Coaching alumna)

Newcomers often experience a sense of uncertainty and vulnerability as they establish themselves as valued members of the team. Onboarding for mid-career senior leaders is a make-it-or-break-it proposition, and to do it well takes longer than 90 days. Success requires a new approach so that executives can find the support they need for socializing into a new culture.Onboarding

This book, written by Evidence Based Coaching alumna Louise Korver, offers practical tools, lessons from experience, a troubleshooting guide, and best practice management routines to accelerate successful integration based on lessons learned by executives at large, global companies.

 

Tomorrow's Change Makers: Reclaiming the Power of Citizenship for a New Generation, by Marilyn Price-Mitchell, PhD (Human Development alumna)

Each and every day, families, schools, and communities play important roles in raising and educating compassionate young citizens. But how does this happen? How do we support young people to become their best selves in a global society?

ChangeMakersTomorrow's Change Makers by alumna Dr. Marilyn Price Mitchell reveals new and surprising research, and delivers hopeful answers. Through powerful stories of American youth who believe in democracy, equal rights, social/environmental justice, and freedom, this book shows how their civic lives were shaped by relationships and service experiences during childhood and adolescence. The book will be released on September 30, 2015.

Looking for the One and To Love Again by Colleen White, EdD (Educational Leadership for Change alumna)

Colleen White is a recent graduate and an educator who resides in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. This summer, she signed with Urban Chapters Publications, which published two African American romance novels this summer.  She also has had two poetry anthologies published.

Looking4theOneToLoveAgainIn Looking for the One, a small town, Mississippi Delta girl will begin to see the world differently, see herself differently, and see love unfold in a way she never thought it could once she realizes that she has finally found the one.  To Love Again is a romance novel with a slight twist.

All of these books are avilable at Amazon.com as well as other through other book sellers.

Do you have a book that’s publishing soon? Send us your information and we’ll include your book our next blog.

 

Tags: change agent, technology, social justice, multicultural, psychology, Organizational development, evidence based coaching, military psychology

Clinical Psychology Student Benefits from Postbac Program

Posted on Tue, Aug 18, 2015

By Marianne McCarthy

David_Alaniz_IMG_7637David Alaniz was accepted into the Clinical Psychology PhD program on his second attempt, and he’s really glad he wasn’t granted admittance the first time around.

“I thought I had what it took to do doctoral work,” said Alaniz, who knew he wanted to be a clinical psychologist but didn’t fully understand everything that’s involved, such as the importance of research, statistical analysis, and critical thinking.

“I didn’t know how a course like psychopathology would be delivered and what we might learn,” he said. “I was surprised that a course in critical thinking was really about writing critically.”

A case manager for Mental Health Systems, Alaniz works with the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation helping reintegrate and re-socialize parolees who were incarcerated for anything from petty theft to murder.

Before he was accepted into the program, Alaniz enrolled in Fielding’s new Postbaccalaureate Clinical Psychology Certificate program to help him sharpen his skills. His first semester included multivariate statistics, and he had doubts he could do it.

“I had Dr. Bush for statistics, and he really explained the basics in a way that resonated with me,” said Alaniz, who immediately saw how statistics could benefit his work. He took what he learned back to his boss at Mental Health Systems and showed him how they could measure behavior. Now they are using a Likert scale system with support and risk factors to predict behavior of recently incarcerated felons.

 “What I love about the faculty is how they work with students and give them opportunities,” said Alaniz, who participated in research for the program lead faculty member, Kristine M. Jacquin, PhD. “I was a lead author for a paper that was presented at a conference, and that was my first authorship. I’m also a certified research assistant now.”

All this gave Alaniz more confidence when he applied to the program the second time. Even faculty saw it.

“There was a change in David’s professional demeanor when he applied the second time,” said School of Psychology faculty member Dr. Debra Bendell. “He was realistic about his options and how difficult the program would be.  However, he was optimistic based on what he had accomplished in the postbac program.”

“When David entered the certificate program, it was clear he had the passion for helping others, intelligence, and motivation needed to become a clinical psychologist. However, he was not familiar with the scholarly side of the field,” said Dr. Jacquin. “In a relatively short time, David gained the critical thinking, scholarly writing, and research skills needed to enter a doctoral program. I’m really proud of him. He will be a great clinical psychologist.”

Alaniz is the first in his family to pursue academics higher than an associate’s degree. He’s working full-time as well as helping raise a teenager as he continues his doctoral studies.

“I know that it’s going to be a lot of work, but I’m ready for the journey,” he said.

Learn more about the Postbac in Clinical Psychology

Tags: adult learning, clinical psychology, fielding graduate university, education

Alumnus Completes 5-Week Stint as Fulbright Specialist

Posted on Thu, Aug 06, 2015

By Marianne McCarthy

Dr. Steven E. Wallis (HOD ’06) just returned from a five-week assignment in Halle, Germany as a Fulbright Specialist supporting experts at a research center develop better theory and policy for more effective teaching, research, and implementation.Wallis3

In true Fielding style, Wallis continued his work postdoctoral and developed a research method, Integrative Propositional Analysis (IPA), which measures the transformative capacity of theories. As an expert at analyzing policies and strategic plans and looking at ways to increase their usefulness to individuals and organizations, 

he applied to the Fulbright Foundation and was added to the Fulbright Specialist Roster in 2013. When IPA caught the eye of a research associate at the Leibniz Institute of Agricultural Development in Transition Economies (IAMO), Wallis got his first assignment.

IAMO (pronounced I-am-oh) develops policy recommendations in agriculture and commerce to support emerging nations in central and Eastern Europe. Wallis worked with IAMO scholars and researchers who want their theories and policies to be more effective in practical applications.

“I spent five weeks in a stimulating and intellectually challenging mix of presentations, workshops, and meetings with individual scholars,” says Wallis.

During his time in Germany, Wallis attended conferences and workshops, gave presentations on this methodology, and mentored scholars and researchers. He helped doctoral candidates sort their literature reviews to identify gaps in the theory where the candidate might focus their research. In another project, he helped researcher, Dr. Tuck Fatt Siew, create and integrate perception graphs of key stakeholders to understand complex problems of water usage in China.

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A doctoral student, Nozilakhon Mukhamedova, was having a difficult time compiling all her research on land and water reform in Central Asia into a coherent picture. Using IPA to map multiple theoretical perspectives, she was able provide a map for moving forward on her dissertation.

“I learned a lot about agriculture, economics, and life in transition economies from my new colleagues,” says Wallis. “In turn, they learned about IPA and made structural improvements to their theories.”

Some of the researchers provided suggestions for improving Wallis’s methodology. Ideas that he says will open a new stream of research.

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 “I am in awe, and deeply appreciative of the transformative events I experienced on this Fulbright Specialist adventure. I feel changed—more confidence in my approach yet, paradoxically, with a new understanding of how IPA may be improved,” says Wallis.

Being a Fulbright specialist is a five-year commitment, and there are a couple of institutions that have requested to work with Wallis. So there’s no telling where he will be placed in the future.

“I was honored to have been selected for this project and wish to express my deep appreciation to Fulbright, IAMO, and supportive colleagues: President Dr. Katrina Rogers at Fielding Graduate University; my Department Chairperson, Dr. Rebecca Loehrer, at Capella University; and Dr. Vladislav Valentinov at IAMO,” said Wallis.

You can read more about Wallis’ experience, at his blog.

Tags: fielding graduate university, research, Fulbright, education

Alumni and Faculty Author Books on Creativity, Art Therapy, Sustainability, and more!

Posted on Mon, Jul 20, 2015

The following books, authored by members of the Fielding community were published in the first half of 2015.

BrandtBookThe Three Sources of Creativity: Breakthroughs from Your Head, Heart and Gut by Betsy Siwula-Brandt  (MA, Organizational Leadership alumna)

This book offers a new way of looking at creativity, and takes a long view of approaching your creative life. The Three Sources of Creativity is not a typical self-help book. It contains a self-assessment, exemplars (modern and ancient), many illustrations, cartoons, exercises and applications tailored to the readers.  Learn how the three sources of creativity work in your life.

This book is packed with inspiring mini-stories and fresh new insights for both your personal and business life.  As a former geoscientist and current consultant, Betsy has served in many industries required to "create something from nothing"—from discovering major oil and gas fields offshore to fostering creativity in international teams—and she wants to share my expertise with you.

For more information visit http://www.threecentersofcreativity.com/author/admin/.

 

FOCUS

FOCUS! Get What You Want Out of Life by Carol-Anne Minski, PhD (Human and Organizational Systems alumna)

This book is for any woman who is standing at the threshold of change or making a decision about the future. Women that were interviewed for the book share their successes and their struggles. You will be inspired by the stories of brave women, determined to achieve their goals.

Carol’s book condenses years of documented research and proven strategies for gaining confidence and overcoming fear. The powerful FOCUS model provides a step-by-step pathway that anyone can use to achieve personal and professional goals.

Watch the video about Carol’s book:  https://youtu.be/KQ3NyY25eSU.

 

Becoming An Art Therapist by Maxine Borowsky Junge, PhD (Human and Organizational Systems alumna)

ArtTherapyIn her eight book since graduating from Fielding, Maxine covers issues in supervision and mentorship, contains stories by art therapy students about what they are thinking and feeling, and letters to young art therapists by highly regarded professionals in the field. The reader has the advantage of ideas and responses from both a student art therapist and an art therapist with many years' experience and is clearly intended for students aiming for a career in therapy.

More information about the book can be found on the publisher’s website, http://www.ccthomas.com/details.cfm?P_ISBN13=9780398090739.

 

A New Psychology for Sustainability Leadership by Steve Schein, PhD (Human and Organizational Systems alumnus)

ScheinIn this book, Schein explores the deeper psychological motivations of sustainability leaders. He shows how these motivations relate to overall effectiveness and capacity to lead transformational change and he explores the ways in which the complexity of sustainability is driving new approaches to leadership. Based on current reviews, the book appears to be opening a new type of discussion about sustainability leadership that could lead to deeper change.

Drawing on interviews with 75 leaders in more than 40 multinational organizations, NGOs, and academia, Schein explores how ecological worldviews and conscious mindsets are developed and expressed in the context of global sustainability practice. By empirically grounding key theories from developmental psychology in sustainability leadership practice, the Schein encourages us to think about leadership in a different way.

For more information visit http://www.greenleaf-publishing.com/productdetail.kmod?productid=4068.

 

GillespeBookThe Anatomy of Death: Notes from a Healer's Casebook by Elena Gillespie, PhD (Human Development alumna)

Elena Gillespie had no idea that her father's death would lead to a door that contravenes everything we think we know about death and dying. Promising her father that that she would learn everything she could about this process, she approached her visionary experiences with the open mind of the researcher.  

While serving as an alternative counselor and Reiki practitioner, Elena worked with the dying. She wrote her dissertation on her transpersonal experiences with the dying, discovereing along the way that death is not to be feared, but may be the beginning of the next great adventure.

Read more at http://www.amazon.com/The-Anatomy-Death-Healers-Casebook/dp/0692403841>

 

Rural_GeniusRural Genius 3: Secrets to Long-Term Marriages by Hilda V. Carpenter, PhD (Human Development alumna)

In the third book of a trilogy, Hilda humorously chronicles 44 years of marriage to three men. The book is a self-parody of Hilda's experiences in 3 marriages, ending with a chapter that identifies 12 lessons she learned and how she has stayed married to her current husband for 30 years.
Learn more this book and others in the trilogy at  http://hildac.wix.com/rural-genius.

Massaging the Mindset: An Intelligent Approach to Systemic Change in Education by Dr. Felecia (Wright) Nace (Educational Leadership for Change alumna)

Felecia Nace—a former teacher, a change facilitator for schools and businesses, and an education specialist for the New Jersey Department of Education—has written a book exploring the subject of systemic change in education.

Massaging_the_MindsetThis book examines the psychology behind systemic change. School leaders will be equipped to view change from a perspective that has rarely been acknowledged. The reader will begin to see change as a process, and will understand the steps needed to attain targeted goals. School leaders will also understand that before any specific changes can take shape in a school system, leaders must first develop change skill sets in staff. Then, and only then will change become a part of school culture. Once this takes place, moving initiatives forward becomes a systemic effort, and administrators will find they have less time management issues as they can then spend more time focused on being a true instructional leader.

Even though it’s written with school leaders in mind, it’s presented in layman’s terms so that families, community members and educators in various positions to easily grasp the concepts about current trends and changes in schools in the US and how each of us plays a unique role, and most importantly, a shared responsibility in the education process.”

For more information about Nace and her book, visit https://rowman.com/ISBN/9781475812145#.

Do you have a book that’s publishing soon? Send us your information and we’ll include your book in next month’s blog.

 

 

 

 

Tags: change agent, creativity, educational leadership, psychology, organizational change, Organizational development, women's issues, sustainability, leadership, fielding graduate university, human development, research

Books by faculty, students and alumni, Spring 2015

Posted on Tue, Jun 09, 2015

The following books, authored by members of the Fielding community, were published in January to May, 2015.

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Storytelling for Sustainability: Deepening the Case for Change by Jeff Leinaweaver (Human and Organizational Systems alumnus)

In this book, veteran sustainability strategist and alumnus Jeff Leinaweaver shows you how storytelling 'transmit resonance' and how it can lead to success or failure.  It describes techniques for using storytelling to attract attention and get better results, whether communicating statistics and priorities, advocating for change, organizing stakeholders, or building an authentic brand and community. Storytelling is an ancient practice and a priceless skill. For sustainability practitioners who want to be more strategic and have more influence in shaping a better world, it is a crucial skill to master. 

 

When The Ball Drops: An Exploratory Study Of Inner-City College Athletes And Crime: Socialization, Risk, Strategy, And Hope by Dexter Juan Davis (Educational Leadership for Change)

BallDropsAccording to Dexter Juan Davis, there has been a significant and disturbing trend of student athletes committing crimes on college campuses. Carefully using data generated from the study of these athletes, Davis utilizes interview data to determine the socialization and behavioral dynamics associated with the propensity for criminal activity by college athletes. This study focuses on emerging themes important in understanding why some athletes from similar backgrounds avoid criminal behavior and how those that run afoul of the law recover from their experiences.

 

Fielding Monograph, Vol. 4: Leadership Studies in Healthcare

“Leadership Studies in Healthcare,” is edited by Fielding Professor Marie Farrell, EdD, former visiting Professor at Harvard School of Public Health, who also served as program manager for nu

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rsing, midwifery, and social work for the World Health Organization (WHO).

This publication includes seven recent researches from outstanding Fielding’s School of Human Organizational Development (HOD) graduates. Read more at http://news.fielding.edu/bid/105090/Fourth-Fielding-Monograph-Published-Leadership-Studies-in-Healthcare

This Fielding monograph is now available worldwide on Amazon. An electronic version of the book, to be distributed by Apple iBooks, is in preparation.

Tags: educational leadership, leadership, fielding graduate university, healthcare, human development, coaching

Media Psychology Student's Documentary Premieres in NYC

Posted on Wed, May 06, 2015

Catherine Seo's Research is Creating a Model for Patients to Collaborate with Their Doctors

By Marianne McCarthy

Last month, Media Psychology student Catherine Seo debuted her documentary film, “The Disease They Call FAT,” at the 1st International Symposium on Lipedema in New York City. The film was part of a two-day event in which top medical researchers, surgeons, and other medical professionals from around the world gathered in support of finding a cure for the often misunderstood (and misdiagnosed) disease.Lipedema TheDiseasetheyCallFAT

Lipedema is a fat disorder characterized by irregular fat distribution under the skin. Typically, fat is disproportionately located on the legs and hips. Painful and debilitating, it can result in immobility if left untreated. An estimated 17 million women in the United States are afflicted with Lipedema; 11% worldwide.

Driven to discover the root of her struggle with unexplainable weight gain and constant pain in her legs, Seo stumbled upon the Lipedema diagnosis in a book by Prof. Dr. Etelka Földi. When she shared her findings with her primary care doctor, who knew nothing about the disorder, he encouraged her to learn more.

“He told me I’d have to help him so he could help me,” said Seo. “I was going to learn what I needed to learn, and do whatever I had to do, in order to find out what was going on with my body, and so, that’s what I did.”

Armed with her Handycam and her research skills, she traveled around the world to interview patients and medical specialists. Her efforts culminated in the documentary film and also a website, Lipedema-Simplified.org, which is a compilation of her research and her personal experience with this disabling disease. She’s even hosted a series of online symposia with doctors that she’s met from around the world.catherine surgery3

In a system that blames obesity on the individual, her goal has been, in part, to raise awareness so that those with Lipedema can stop blaming themselves. Through a partnership with Dr. Mark Smith, director of The Friedman Center for Lymphedema Research & Treatment at Mount Sinai Beth Israel, they created The Lipedema Project, which helps patients form collaborations with their doctors to learn more about their health and what treatment options exist.

“I’m hoping that my experiences provide a model for empowering people to take control of their own health in a way that they can get the kind of collaboration and partnership that they need with their health care providers,” said Seo.catherine photo

She believes that people with any kind of disorder have a lot to contribute to the understanding of it.

“We have a very top-down autocratic health care system. The idea of a patient group being able to collaborate with professional health care clinicians and researchers is unheard of in the health care system,” she said.

During her research, Seo began to realize that the anti-fat bias is deep-rooting in the health care system.

“People are blamed by the media. They are blamed by their health care providers because there’s an underlying assumption that it’s controllability—that the reason that you’re overweight is because you eat too much. Well, it’s much more complex than that,” said Seo.

For her dissertation research (expected completion January 2016), she is exploring how deeply women's lives are impacted by cultural distortions of women and their bodies. She admits that she was also quick to blame herself at first, even though she was doing all the right things. Healthcare professionals either explicitly or implicitly reinforced her self-assessment. 

As Seo finalizes her dissertation on media’s influence on women and the idealization of body image, she is exploring self-compassion meditation as an intervention because “so many of us try so hard to change ourselves to meet some external value structure.”

Her work won’t stop there though. She and Media Psychology Faculty Member Karen Dill-Shackleford have submitted a research grant proposal focused on improving body image dissatisfaction.

“Understanding the psychology of how media is projected, how it’s consumed, how it’s integrated into our culture, is the leading edge of what’s happening,” Seo said.

A preview of “The Disease They Call FAT” can be view at http://lipedemaproject.org/premiere2015. The full version will be available in June 2015.

Click to learn more about Fielding's Media Psychology program. 

Tags: Media psychology, women's issues, adult learning, fielding graduate university, healthcare

Col. Porter: First Psychologist to Command an Army Health Care Facility

Posted on Fri, Apr 10, 2015

By Marianne McCarthy

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Rebecca Porter entered military service for much the same reason many young people did in the 70s—to help pay for their education.

“As it turned out I was not eligible for a scholarship because I had really bad eyes. But I was already enrolled, and I liked it, and so I stuck with it,” said Porter, now a colonel in the US Army with 20 years of service.

After her ROTC program, she was assigned to the Military Police Corps, but her real interests lie in psychology. So, she transferred to the Army Reserve and started on her master’s degree in counseling. That’s when she and a fellow student learned about Fielding’s doctoral program in clinical psychology.

This was back in ’91—before the prevalence of the Internet. She was pregnant with her first child, and her husband had just been deployed to Desert Storm. But Fielding’s distributed learning model made it all doable.

“With my husband being on active duty, I didn’t know how long we would be at any one location,” said Porter who re-entered active duty herself and applied for the Army’s Health Professions Scholarship. She joined the Reno cluster and graduated four years and three months later.

After his tour of duty, Porter’s husband was transferred to Hawaii, and she began her internship at Tripler Army Medical Center. Immediately following, she directed the chronic pain program there. Later she returned for a postdoctoral fellowship and then directed the fellowship program. (Porter is shown below in Hawaii with her mentor, Jerry Nims, PhD, JD, several years after her graduation.)

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Like many in the military, Porter’s career in the Army is characterized by a series of shifting assignments that span the country. When in the Army, you go where they tell you to.
For Porter, it was the Pentagon. She was first called to the Office of the Chief of Legislative Liaison where she received a different kind of education.

“It was an exciting job and so educational to see how Capitol Hill and the Pentagon work together, sometimes in a point-counter-point way but also in a complementary way,” said Porter.

In her second position in the Pentagon, Porter became a special assistant for the Well Being of the Army where she advised the Army senior leadership on things like how your work environment impacts your affinity to the Army.

“In that role I got another phenomenal education about how the senior leadership of the Army functions—how the processes work to fund programs, to look at evidence and look at the data to inform whether or not to keep a program,” she said.


DunhamPorter later went on to be the Chief of Behavioral Health for the Army Surgeon General and Director of Psychological Health for the Army. In that job she was a leader in Behavioral Health policy for the Army and testified before Congress on various healthcare matters.


Today Porter is Commander of Dunham US Army Health Clinic in Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania. The facility provides primary health care for approximately 12,000 students at the US Army War College and other beneficiaries in the area. She is the first psychologist in the Army to be appointed to head a medical treatment facility, and she’s found her background essential.

“I have relied, almost daily, on my background as a clinical psychologist in doing this job,” said Porter. “I have addressed personnel and morale issues in the clinic through the use of some of what I know about attitude formation, attitude change, and confirmation bias. I’ve set up programs to try to shift peoples’ attention to positive things, rather than negative things.

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“I have always felt like I had the right academic background and interpersonal background to be able to do what I’m doing now.”

This past January, Porter came to Winter Session in Santa Barbara and spoke candidly about military psychology and how policy on post-traumatic stress syndrome (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI) has changed since the 1980s. For example, you can stay on active duty with PTSD as long as you can complete your duty.

"PTSD affects the entire family," said Porter, which is why it's important to put counselors in the schools with children of military parents.

 

Tags: adult learning, higher education, clinical psychology, fielding graduate university, army, graduate education, military psychology, veterans

ISI Fellows present their work at Winter Session 2015

Posted on Thu, Jan 29, 2015

by Marianne McCarthy

Fellows from the Institute for Social Innovation (ISI) pursue consulting work and research projects that bring about innovation and change for individuals, organizations, and communities. Several ISI fellows gathered at winter session to share and present updates on their work in areas of education, leadership, politics, incarceration, healthcare, and social change. 

Silvina Bamrungpong and Drew Foley (HOD '12)

During the past year, Drs. Drew Foley and Silvina Bamrungpong have shared their research on Learning in Motion – Designing Connected Learning Spaces through conference presentations and workshops for innovative thinkers in the fields of education and business. 

In October, Drs. Foley and Bamrungpong conducted a workshop at the Innovative Pedagogy and eLearning Conference at Pacific University in Forest Grove, Oregon. The workshop focused on two central concepts: 1) Learning is in motion and 2) Learning spaces are connected.  They collaborated with educators and researchers with affiliations ranging from the London School of Economics to universities in Africa, Australia, South America, and Asia.

In 2015, they plan to publish a book that focuses on application of their research.

Steve Schein (HOD ‘14)

Dr. Steve Schein presented details from his ongoing research and new book, A New Psychology for Sustainability Leadership: The Hidden Power of Worldviews. The book is based on his dissertation research on the deeper psychological motivations of sustainability leaders and how these motivations may influence their capacity to lead transformational change.

Zieva Konvisser (HOD ’06)

Dr. Zieva Dauber Konvisser presented an update on her research project on the implications and impact of wrongful conviction on innocent individuals and the findings from interviews with 21 innocent women in the United States. This study provides the wrongfully convicted women an opportunity to give voice to their lived experiences and the strategies that helped them cope with their situations and move forward.

Dr. Konvisser also reported on the numerous publishing and promotional activities related to the 2014 release of her book, Living Beyond Terrorism: Israeli Stories of Hope and Healing (Gefen Publishing), which is based on interviews that were conducted as part of her doctoral and post-doctoral research studies.

Her latest collaborative project on exonerees in the innocence movement involves Wayne State University Criminal Justice Professor Marvin Zalman and looks at the effects of this work on the innocence movement and the lives of participants.

Susan Mazer (HOD ‘11)
In the two years since her graduation, Dr. Susan Mazer has entered a different dialogue within healthcare and within the academic music community.  Her presentation provided an overview of both what has been achieved and what is in process regarding improving the patient experience and quality of caring.

Linda Honold (HOD ’99)
To ensure a healthy vibrant democracy our political structures must engage citizens, be fair and transparent. Dr. Linda Honold’s case studies of state redistricting campaigns are critical because if the process does not fairly represent us our democracy is at risk.

She is conducting five studies of reform efforts in California, Florida, Illinois, Ohio, and states limited to legislative reform efforts. Data derived from interviews with activists and other primary players will be analyzed to discern activities and events contributing to the outcome of the effort revealing commonalities and differences. These lessons learned might then be used to inform plans for other ballot initiatives that advocates in other states engage in.

Susan Stillman (ELC '07)
Emotional Intelligence (EQ) is the ability to use emotions, combined with cognition, to make optimal decisions. Emotions affect how and what we learn. Scholar/practitioners have demonstrated how critical it is for all students and the adults who care for them to learn the skills of EQ, or Social Emotional Learning as it is called in education. Emotional literacy, consequential thinking, emotional navigation, optimism, and empathy, are a few of the skills that comprise SEL.

Dr. Susan Stillman shared the iterative process used to develop the free online course, Introduction to Social Emotional Learning. She also discussed how participants in the ISI session can become involved in the project to share iSEL with thousands of educators worldwide. 

Stephen White (MP '13)

Stephen White's current research centers on a social innovation in the film issue space: the emergence of an online convener platform called FilmRaise.  The website was created to allow the audience to watch a social issue documentary film and choose a charity to donate to for free.  He hopes to explore whether measures that are used to evaluate and promote people’s subjective well-being or happiness, can be used to shape content and measure impact for media makers trying to bring about positive social change. 

To learn more about the work of these and other ISI fellows, view the current list of fellows and their research topics.

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ISI Fellows pictured above from left to right (first row) Susan Stillman, Linda Honold, Anita Chambers, Zieva Konvisser, (second row) Drew Foley, Silvina Bamrunpong, Pamela Kennebrew (guest), (third row) Steve Schein, and Tracey Long.

Tags: Media psychology, organizational change, women's issues, graduate fellows, research, fellow program

New Books by Fielding Students, Faculty, and Alumni (December 2014)

Posted on Thu, Jan 22, 2015

The following books, authored by members of the Fielding community, were published in December 2014.

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Magic of Mentoring, by Barbara Perkins (Evidence Based Coaching alumna)

The Magic of Mentoring: Pearls of Wisdom is a collection of short stories written by 47 contributors, or “Pearls,” who believe that mentoring is the key to success for young people today. Each contributor’s story shares a personal journey on how their lives were changed for the better because of mentoring. According to Perkins, there is an overwhelming need to find perfect matches for children in cities across this nation in need of all the benefits that positive mentoring will bring to their lives.

The Psychotherapy Relationship: Cultural Influences (Fielding Monograph Series: Volume Two), edited by Sherry Hatcher (Clinical Psychology faculty)

This second volume in Fielding’s Monograph Series features six articles on the cultural ramifications of the psychotherapy relationship, based on recent dissertations by Fielding graduates. Edited by Sherry L. Hatcher, the studies explore unique socio-cultural aspects of the therapy relationship.Monograph Vol2

• Jessie Whitehorse Lopez’s article, co-authored by Robert L. Hatcher, tells us about Native American psychotherapy clients: how they evaluate standard measures of alliance, and which criteria they propose to add in order to foster trust in the therapy relationship.

• Christine Mok-Lammé reminds us to avoid stereotyping. Her article illustrates common expectations about what Chinese American psychotherapy clients want from their therapy, in terms of either cognitive or emotion-based interventions.

• Arielle Schwartz takes us into “new age” culture by asking what psychologists think about embedding mind-body methods in their work, such as the use of relaxation techniques, mindfulness practices, and more. She discovered interesting discrepancies between the mind-body techniques that psychologists value personally, and those that they are disinclined to incorporate into their professional work.

• The article by Shanna Jackson looks at parallel cultures of abuse and what happens when therapists, who have themselves suffered abuse and trauma, treat clients with a similar history. The potential for “vicarious traumatization” suggests that methods that typically promote therapist empathy may instead have the potential to unwittingly retraumatize some therapists.

• Chaya Rubin and Comfort Shields explore the culture of therapists’ judgments, based on archival data from a study published by the editor of this issue. They investigate the question of whether the perceived culpability or vulnerability of a psychotherapy client may affect a therapist’s ability to empathize with that client.

• Michelle Horowitz introduces the reader to an exponentially expanding culture of social media and, in particular, how the delivery of electronically-mediated psychotherapy may positively and/or negatively impact the therapeutic relationship.

The monograph series is available for purchase on Amazon.com

New Directions in Media Psychology (Fielding Monograph Series, Volume Three), edited Karen Dill-Shackleford (Media Psychology faculty)

Monograph Vol3In this third volume of Fielding's Monograph six articles broaden the boundaries of Media Psychology, a field that Fielding introduced as a doctoral discipline in 2003. This volume illustrates the range of topics that the media psychology discipline can encompass, as illustrated by the recent dissertation research of six media psychology alumni.

• Gordon Goodman’s study examines one medium of entertainment long ignored by psychologists, namely the stage. An accomplished actor and director in his own right, Dr. Goodman asked whether stage fright, popularly associated with young and inexperienced actors, continues to vex accomplished, veteran actors.

• The article by Jennifer Johnston summarizes her groundbreaking study on childhood exposure to pornography, a dominant genre in virtually all media, and the effects of such exposure on sexual satisfaction in adulthood. Dr. Johnson’s findings show that early exposure to pornography can increase sexual satisfaction when mediated by sexual experience.

• Jonny White addresses the realm of storytelling. Based on five in-depth interviews with accomplished authors of fiction, augmented by additional case study material, Dr. White concluded that authors benefit from stepping outside of their societal narrative conventions in order to develop new perspectives for storytelling.

• In her article, Bernadette Chitunya-Wilson underscores the enduring power of one of our culture’s most important legacy media: television. Her inquiry probes the question of whether frequent viewing of reality TV shows involving cosmetic surgery actually fosters a desire among viewers to undergo cosmetic surgery themselves.

• Alicia Vitagliano turns our attention to another legacy platform, namely, print journalism covering the field of professional sports. Given that the number of female sports journalists has grown in recent decades since the adoption of Title IX in 1972, she wonders whether a reader’s gender and internalized sexism would affect his or her views towards a sports article written by a female journalist.

• Ivone Umar examines the role of the Internet in an area largely overlooked by American scholars: the ability of students born in Latin America to integrate within an American college community in the United States. Dr. Umar’s data show that the use of the Internet in the host language—English—was a positive factor in the acculturation process, whereas the use of the Internet in the student’s native language was correlated with a slower acculturation on an American English-speaking campus.

The monograph series is available for purchase on Amazon.com

Do you have a book that’s publishing soon? Send us your information and we’ll include your book in next month’s blog.

Tags: Media psychology, psychology, fielding faculty, clinical psychology, fielding graduate university, coaching