Points of Pride

Alumni and Faculty Author Books on Creativity, Art Therapy, Sustainability, and more!

Posted on Mon, Jul 20, 2015

The following books, authored by members of the Fielding community were published in the first half of 2015.

BrandtBookThe Three Sources of Creativity: Breakthroughs from Your Head, Heart and Gut by Betsy Siwula-Brandt  (MA, Organizational Leadership alumna)

This book offers a new way of looking at creativity, and takes a long view of approaching your creative life. The Three Sources of Creativity is not a typical self-help book. It contains a self-assessment, exemplars (modern and ancient), many illustrations, cartoons, exercises and applications tailored to the readers.  Learn how the three sources of creativity work in your life.

This book is packed with inspiring mini-stories and fresh new insights for both your personal and business life.  As a former geoscientist and current consultant, Betsy has served in many industries required to "create something from nothing"—from discovering major oil and gas fields offshore to fostering creativity in international teams—and she wants to share my expertise with you.

For more information visit http://www.threecentersofcreativity.com/author/admin/.

 

FOCUS

FOCUS! Get What You Want Out of Life by Carol-Anne Minski, PhD (Human and Organizational Systems alumna)

This book is for any woman who is standing at the threshold of change or making a decision about the future. Women that were interviewed for the book share their successes and their struggles. You will be inspired by the stories of brave women, determined to achieve their goals.

Carol’s book condenses years of documented research and proven strategies for gaining confidence and overcoming fear. The powerful FOCUS model provides a step-by-step pathway that anyone can use to achieve personal and professional goals.

Watch the video about Carol’s book:  https://youtu.be/KQ3NyY25eSU.

 

Becoming An Art Therapist by Maxine Borowsky Junge, PhD (Human and Organizational Systems alumna)

ArtTherapyIn her eight book since graduating from Fielding, Maxine covers issues in supervision and mentorship, contains stories by art therapy students about what they are thinking and feeling, and letters to young art therapists by highly regarded professionals in the field. The reader has the advantage of ideas and responses from both a student art therapist and an art therapist with many years' experience and is clearly intended for students aiming for a career in therapy.

More information about the book can be found on the publisher’s website, http://www.ccthomas.com/details.cfm?P_ISBN13=9780398090739.

 

A New Psychology for Sustainability Leadership by Steve Schein, PhD (Human and Organizational Systems alumnus)

ScheinIn this book, Schein explores the deeper psychological motivations of sustainability leaders. He shows how these motivations relate to overall effectiveness and capacity to lead transformational change and he explores the ways in which the complexity of sustainability is driving new approaches to leadership. Based on current reviews, the book appears to be opening a new type of discussion about sustainability leadership that could lead to deeper change.

Drawing on interviews with 75 leaders in more than 40 multinational organizations, NGOs, and academia, Schein explores how ecological worldviews and conscious mindsets are developed and expressed in the context of global sustainability practice. By empirically grounding key theories from developmental psychology in sustainability leadership practice, the Schein encourages us to think about leadership in a different way.

For more information visit http://www.greenleaf-publishing.com/productdetail.kmod?productid=4068.

 

GillespeBookThe Anatomy of Death: Notes from a Healer's Casebook by Elena Gillespie, PhD (Human Development alumna)

Elena Gillespie had no idea that her father's death would lead to a door that contravenes everything we think we know about death and dying. Promising her father that that she would learn everything she could about this process, she approached her visionary experiences with the open mind of the researcher.  

While serving as an alternative counselor and Reiki practitioner, Elena worked with the dying. She wrote her dissertation on her transpersonal experiences with the dying, discovereing along the way that death is not to be feared, but may be the beginning of the next great adventure.

Read more at http://www.amazon.com/The-Anatomy-Death-Healers-Casebook/dp/0692403841>

 

Rural_GeniusRural Genius 3: Secrets to Long-Term Marriages by Hilda V. Carpenter, PhD (Human Development alumna)

In the third book of a trilogy, Hilda humorously chronicles 44 years of marriage to three men. The book is a self-parody of Hilda's experiences in 3 marriages, ending with a chapter that identifies 12 lessons she learned and how she has stayed married to her current husband for 30 years.
Learn more this book and others in the trilogy at  http://hildac.wix.com/rural-genius.

Massaging the Mindset: An Intelligent Approach to Systemic Change in Education by Dr. Felecia (Wright) Nace (Educational Leadership for Change alumna)

Felecia Nace—a former teacher, a change facilitator for schools and businesses, and an education specialist for the New Jersey Department of Education—has written a book exploring the subject of systemic change in education.

Massaging_the_MindsetThis book examines the psychology behind systemic change. School leaders will be equipped to view change from a perspective that has rarely been acknowledged. The reader will begin to see change as a process, and will understand the steps needed to attain targeted goals. School leaders will also understand that before any specific changes can take shape in a school system, leaders must first develop change skill sets in staff. Then, and only then will change become a part of school culture. Once this takes place, moving initiatives forward becomes a systemic effort, and administrators will find they have less time management issues as they can then spend more time focused on being a true instructional leader.

Even though it’s written with school leaders in mind, it’s presented in layman’s terms so that families, community members and educators in various positions to easily grasp the concepts about current trends and changes in schools in the US and how each of us plays a unique role, and most importantly, a shared responsibility in the education process.”

For more information about Nace and her book, visit https://rowman.com/ISBN/9781475812145#.

Do you have a book that’s publishing soon? Send us your information and we’ll include your book in next month’s blog.

 

 

 

 

Tags: change agent, creativity, educational leadership, psychology, organizational change, Organizational development, women's issues, sustainability, leadership, fielding graduate university, human development, research

Books by faculty, students and alumni, Spring 2015

Posted on Tue, Jun 09, 2015

The following books, authored by members of the Fielding community, were published in January to May, 2015.

Leinaweaver_LR

Storytelling for Sustainability: Deepening the Case for Change by Jeff Leinaweaver (Human and Organizational Systems alumnus)

In this book, veteran sustainability strategist and alumnus Jeff Leinaweaver shows you how storytelling 'transmit resonance' and how it can lead to success or failure.  It describes techniques for using storytelling to attract attention and get better results, whether communicating statistics and priorities, advocating for change, organizing stakeholders, or building an authentic brand and community. Storytelling is an ancient practice and a priceless skill. For sustainability practitioners who want to be more strategic and have more influence in shaping a better world, it is a crucial skill to master. 

 

When The Ball Drops: An Exploratory Study Of Inner-City College Athletes And Crime: Socialization, Risk, Strategy, And Hope by Dexter Juan Davis (Educational Leadership for Change)

BallDropsAccording to Dexter Juan Davis, there has been a significant and disturbing trend of student athletes committing crimes on college campuses. Carefully using data generated from the study of these athletes, Davis utilizes interview data to determine the socialization and behavioral dynamics associated with the propensity for criminal activity by college athletes. This study focuses on emerging themes important in understanding why some athletes from similar backgrounds avoid criminal behavior and how those that run afoul of the law recover from their experiences.

 

Fielding Monograph, Vol. 4: Leadership Studies in Healthcare

“Leadership Studies in Healthcare,” is edited by Fielding Professor Marie Farrell, EdD, former visiting Professor at Harvard School of Public Health, who also served as program manager for nu

Fielding_monograph_number_4-resized-600

rsing, midwifery, and social work for the World Health Organization (WHO).

This publication includes seven recent researches from outstanding Fielding’s School of Human Organizational Development (HOD) graduates. Read more at http://news.fielding.edu/bid/105090/Fourth-Fielding-Monograph-Published-Leadership-Studies-in-Healthcare

This Fielding monograph is now available worldwide on Amazon. An electronic version of the book, to be distributed by Apple iBooks, is in preparation.

Tags: educational leadership, leadership, fielding graduate university, healthcare, human development, coaching

MA-CEL Alumna Invited to White House to Receive Presidential Arts Funding

Posted on Thu, Aug 14, 2014


By Marianne McCarthy

Malissa Cindy Rachel with captionWhen Principal Rachel Clark Messineo (MA-CEL, ’08) received an invitation to the White House this past May, she knew her school had been chosen as a recipient of an arts education initiative that could help make a difference in her school. But the students of Burbank Elementary and the rest of San Diego didn’t know for sure until they watched the event streaming live from the White House. Of course, they couldn’t be more proud and excited, as are we at Fielding.

Burbank Elementary is one of only 35 schools across the nation to participate in the Turnaround Arts Initiative, an assistance program that provides training, development, and workshops to ensure that the arts are an available avenue to success for all students.

Underperforming School Struggles to Change

Led by the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities, together with local partners, Turnaround Arts aims to help failing schools implement high quality arts education to “turnaround” the pervasive problems found in high-poverty, chronically underperforming schools. By using the arts as a strategic tool, students are engaged while they learn 21st century skills critical to their success.

Burbank Elementary is located in the “Barrio Logan” area of San Diego, serving 350 students, all of whom are socioeconomically disadvantaged. In 2010, it was identified as performing in the lowest 5% of all California schools.Burbank Elementary

 “We’ve been a chronically under-performing school for many years working hard to make a difference, but our scores just go up a tiny bit each year, so it’s hard work. Our kids are low income, second-language learners, part of a very transient population. There are lots of things working against us, but we’re really hoping that integrating arts will be an avenue to attract students to stay at our school,” says Rachel.

She explains that due to limited funding Burbank Elementary doesn’t offer any on-going activities like some of the other more affluent schools in her district. When funds get cut, it’s usually the arts and extracurricular activities that go first. Burbank doesn’t have funds to provide anything other than the core classes: reading, science, math, and history. Kids who struggle in these areas typically don’t want to come to school, says Rachel.

“If we had an acting class, or a singing class, or a dance class, they’d be more excited about coming to school and could learn through song or dance. They could learn through acting, building sets, things like that.  So we’re looking at integrating arts as a way to improve our academics which will ultimately improve self-esteem, confidence, and attendance…maybe we could even become a school of choice for new students.”

Believing in the Value of Arts Education

She believes that there is a connection between arts education and academic achievement. She has a personal connection and passion for arts education as she has played the flute, piccolo, and piano since elementary-school age. She has experienced first-hand how arts education increases student motivation, confidence, and teamwork.

Associated with the school since 2009, Rachel has moved up the ladder from teacher to grant coordinator to just last year being appointed principal.

“As I began my journey toward an administrative position, I started utilizing materials that I had learned at Fielding. It just kept sinking in deeper and deeper,” says Rachel.  “Now that I’m a principal, I frequently draw upon the readings, the books, the activities, and the collaborative tasks that were assigned. Facilitators said, ‘Trust the process,’ and several years later, I see what they meant.”

Turnaround Arts Equips Teachers with Powerful Tools

TurnaroundArtslogoAccording to the Turnaround Arts website, placing the arts as the heart and soul of a school gives leadership and teachers powerful tools to improve school climate and culture, increase student and parent engagement, which ultimately contributes to improved academic achievement and the successful turnaround of a failing school.

Obamas KidsTurnaround Arts began as a pilot program with eight schools, and celebrating that success is what the White House event was all about. First Lady Michelle Obama hosted a talent show in the East Room of the White House, which was transformed into an old fashioned school auditorium. Students from the program’s inaugural schools showed off their skills singing, dancing, making music, and reciting poetry. The First Lady also announced the expansion of the program, from eight pilot schools to 35 schools, 10 from California. Celebrities Sara Jessica Parker and Alfre Woodard, artist-mentors who were paired with one of the original eight schools, were there to help promote the event. President Barack Obama even made a surprise appearance before the show concluded—and Rachel and her superintendent got to shake his hand at the event.

Burbank Gets Assigned an Artist-Mentor

This month, Burbank Elementary meets their new artist-mentor, Grammy award-winning musician Jason Mraz, who lives in the San Diego area. Mraz will work with Rachel and Burbank teachers to infuse the arts into curriculum and campus culture over the next three years.

“We have planned to learn how to play the guitar and ukulele, and Jason plays both!” says Rachel.  “Our hope is that we can have a concert with him at the end of the year with students all playing one of his songs.”

Mraz said in a statement, “I’m humbled by the opportunity to support and represent a school in our country and my local community that will greatly benefit from the support of a vibrant arts education program. The arts are the key to life and the Turnaround Arts program will open the doors for youth to life, love, creativity and endless imagination.”


Tags: art education, change agent, social justice, educational leadership, diversity, multicultural, arts, fielding graduate university, graduate education, teacher education, MA-CEL

Dr. Latisha Webb (ELC’13) Wins Entrepreneurial Award

Posted on Thu, Dec 19, 2013

Empowers Others through Multiple Ventures

By Marianne McCarthy

Dr. Latisha Webb ARWEY Award winnerDr. Latisha Webb, a January 2013 graduate of the School of Educational Leadership for Change (ELC), likens her ability to manage multiple projects as similar to an octopus. Last month when she received an American Riviera Woman Entrepreneur of The Year (ARWEY) award, however, it was not for her physical ambidexterity. Instead she received accolades for her entrepreneurial spirit and commitment to multiple innovative endeavors that focus on empowering others.

"The ARWEY awards recognize and celebrate women and the accomplishments they have made in communities throughout the world. We applaud the efforts of women dedicated to creating the best possible environments in the workplace and improving communities using "new business" models,” said Tia Walker, ARWEY Awards executive director.

A true entrepreneur, Dr. Webb has her arms in several different ventures—nonprofit and for-profit businesses, as well as her own personal brand, On B.L.A.S.T.

“On B.L.A.S.T. stands for Being and Living my Authentic Self Today, which is a derivative of my Fielding dissertation, Discovering the Authentic Self: The Concurrent Processes of Being and Becoming.” said Dr. Webb. “It’s about defining and understanding the authentic self and then loving and embracing our very Being now while becoming who we inspire to be in the future.  We as individuals should align our core values, thought processes, actions, relationships, and every aspect of our lives so we can become who we're destined to become.”

She and her pastor provide weekly On B.L.A.S.T. conference calls that lead listeners through a six-dimensional self-discovery process of the physical, spiritual, psychological, emotional, social and sexual aspects of the authentic self.

“Sometimes we focus so much on the physical, but then we don’t take care of our psychological.  Or we concentrate on the social and neglect the spiritual.  From a systems theory perspective, On B.L.A.S.T. provides a way for us to understand that we as human begins many parts and those parts are all interdependent to make us who we are,” explained Dr. Webb.

She developed the curricula Demystifying Sexuality and the Impact of Trauma (DSIT) and Survivors of Trauma Educational Program: Stepping into My Authentic Self (STEP) based on several research projects while at Fielding. Her book, The Authentic Love Experience: Pillow Talk Topics for Couples who Desire a Holistic Relationship, addresses the six dimensions of the authentic self for couples and singles who desire to be in a committed relationship.

Named a Worldwide Network for Gender Empowerment (WNGE) fellow for 2011-2012, Dr. Webb presented at the United Nations on "Empowering Women through Demystifying Sexuality." A victim of sexual abuse herself, her mission is to empower women all over the world who have experienced sexual trauma to discover, be, and live their authentic selves.

Dr. Latisha WebbDr. Webb is also a committed human service professional. In her 13 years as a practitioner, she has served a myriad of populations: survivors of sexual trauma, the homeless, people living with HIV/AIDS, people in recovery, returning citizens, and neglected and abused children. She is currently the Director of Operations and one of the founding partners of OpportUNITY, Inc., a nonprofit organization which provides a myriad of educational and employment opportunities to disenfranchised populations, specifically targeting returning citizens, women, veterans, and people in recovery.

OpportUNITY’s programs are designed to foster economic empowerment, advancement, achievement, and self-determined homeownership. For example, the organization offers the welfare-to-work population hands-on experience through its PAATHS (Practical Application And Training in Human Services) program, which trains volunteers in the field of human services by providing opportunities to participants in the other programs who are returning citizens. Their flagship program is a 16-week residential construction-training program which provides homeless men, women, and others to learn a skill set and become gainfully employed. Willam and Latisha Webb at work at OpportUNITY, Inc.

“We have a great relationship with the South Philadelphia EARN Center who places public assistance recipients at job sites.  We train our volunteers from the EARN Center in the fielding of human services, in hopes to spark an interest and desire to apply for an entry level position in the field,” said Webb.

“Dr. Webb represents the new paradigm woman leader and business person, leading with her heart and creating economic empowerment for women which is at the core of the ARWEY Awards,” said Walker.

“In order to be a change agent, first you must go through a change process.  Having bought into the vision of Fielding and what it represents for world changers, I am lifelong learner and scholar-practitioner,” said Webb. “The more I learn, the freer I am. As I move in liberation, the freer I am to teach, free, and liberate others.”

Tags: change agent, educational leadership, trauma psychology, adult learning, fielding graduate university, authentic self, entrepreneur

Touching Lives, Changing Systems, Creating the Future

Posted on Mon, Oct 22, 2012
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By Henry H Fowler (ELC '10)

Fielding allowed me to thrive from the comfort of my cultural environment.

Fielding’s focus on the art of teaching brought me back to my Native land.  I was challenged to study and investigate curriculum as it related to my native population and create new approaches that could make a difference in the lives of young Navajo people. 

Even though I have long been motivated to teach math, throughout the years of my teaching career, I began to have mixed feelings about teaching math.  My enthusiasm about teaching math had begun to lessen. Each year in my math classes, I observed my students who were quiet and unmotivated to learn mathematics. My teaching was unattractive to them and they found my questions meaningless. My daily challenge was to teach math to students who lacked knowledge of basic math facts, were unmotivated, had high absenteeism and tardiness, were unprepared for class, lacked parental support, lacked current math books, had no access to technology, had high class enrollment, and were disruptive.  The sum of these reasons weighed heavily on me, and my passion for teaching began to stall.  Fortunately, my enrollment at Fielding afforded me a new platform for thinking critically about my teaching experience.  As a direct result of my work at Fielding, I have made inquiry and gained clear insight about teaching math to Navajo students.  This has set the stage for invigorated research about and development of new instructional strategies that have energized my students to learn math and me to teach.


I am very grateful that I had the opportunity to experience a wealth of education through Fielding Graduate University. Fielding provided me an education that was practical, meaningful, and relevant. The Educational Leadership and Change curriculum was suitable for me and it was tailored to my needs.  The schooling I received at Fielding is closely correlated with the teaching of the Navajos. In the Navajo culture, our elders illuminate their teaching based on the notion that is up to an individual to be a self-directed learner, to find balance, and to produce positive experiences that will improve quality of life for everyone. Fielding’s similar emphasis on self-direction to create positive experiences, has allowed me to extend my knowledge in areas of my interest to me and to explore and integrate other theories to expand my perspective in education. Fielding was open to and supportive of my cultural background.  This support has allowed me to strive for more in-depth study.

Fielding helped open the opportunity for me to address the dismal outlook of the Navajo high school poor performance in mathematics.  As a direct result of the Fielding curriculum, I am more aware of my surroundings and how they impact teaching delivery and reception.  I bring an enlivened critical thinking mindset to my intellectual endeavors, and I feel empowered as a teacher to lead efforts to change the math education on the Navajo Reservation.  I am encouraged to broaden the perspective of my immediate horizon and challenged to actively pursue my interest in improving math education for Navajo students.  The Fielding approach to learning engaged me and afforded me learning experiences which were was relevant and meaningful.

The Navajos believe they are part of nature, and that this natural order gives directions for life.  The Navajos agree their natural surroundings bring the energy of spirit to the people.  That energy is infused with purpose and direction for the Navajo people.  According to Hozho, the Navajo purpose on this earth is to keep in balance, harmony, and respect with the natural order.  A good life resides in every angle of the morning light with a promising sense of beauty, hope, and determination for every individual.  The Navajo understand, that with a sense of the complementary and supplementary, an individual will feel beauty above, below, around, and before him or her from every angle.  The Navajo continue to practice this traditional heritage.  Complementary angles are two angles whose angles add up to 90 degrees and supplementary angles are two angles whose angles add up to 180 degrees. Using the Hozho model, this phenomenon could be represented to Navajo learners as ‘beauty above me + beauty below me = 90 degrees, and beauty around me + beauty before me = 180 degrees.  I believe it is time for Navajo educators to lead in creating educational math materials for the Navajo high school students to support their mathematical reasoning and communication. This approach to Navajo education would help students realize that math is part of their culture and to inspire students take an interest in appreciating and studying mathematics rather than feeling separate from it and mystified by it. 

The learning I acquired from Fielding provided me with new skills to tackle the problematic issues faced by the Navajo high school students in learning mathematics and succeeding on the standardized tests. Fielding staff provided excellent feedback for me to grow and expand my horizons in the scholarly world by recommending stellar literatures to read that related to my interests and field of study.  Fielding staff made me feel special because they listened to and valued my opinions.  I feel as if I have been nourished.

 

Tags: educational leadership, diversity, multicultural, graduate education