Points of Pride

Books by faculty, students and alumni, Spring 2015

Posted on Tue, Jun 09, 2015

The following books, authored by members of the Fielding community, were published in January to May, 2015.

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Storytelling for Sustainability: Deepening the Case for Change by Jeff Leinaweaver (Human and Organizational Systems alumnus)

In this book, veteran sustainability strategist and alumnus Jeff Leinaweaver shows you how storytelling 'transmit resonance' and how it can lead to success or failure.  It describes techniques for using storytelling to attract attention and get better results, whether communicating statistics and priorities, advocating for change, organizing stakeholders, or building an authentic brand and community. Storytelling is an ancient practice and a priceless skill. For sustainability practitioners who want to be more strategic and have more influence in shaping a better world, it is a crucial skill to master. 

 

When The Ball Drops: An Exploratory Study Of Inner-City College Athletes And Crime: Socialization, Risk, Strategy, And Hope by Dexter Juan Davis (Educational Leadership for Change)

BallDropsAccording to Dexter Juan Davis, there has been a significant and disturbing trend of student athletes committing crimes on college campuses. Carefully using data generated from the study of these athletes, Davis utilizes interview data to determine the socialization and behavioral dynamics associated with the propensity for criminal activity by college athletes. This study focuses on emerging themes important in understanding why some athletes from similar backgrounds avoid criminal behavior and how those that run afoul of the law recover from their experiences.

 

Fielding Monograph, Vol. 4: Leadership Studies in Healthcare

“Leadership Studies in Healthcare,” is edited by Fielding Professor Marie Farrell, EdD, former visiting Professor at Harvard School of Public Health, who also served as program manager for nu

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rsing, midwifery, and social work for the World Health Organization (WHO).

This publication includes seven recent researches from outstanding Fielding’s School of Human Organizational Development (HOD) graduates. Read more at http://news.fielding.edu/bid/105090/Fourth-Fielding-Monograph-Published-Leadership-Studies-in-Healthcare

This Fielding monograph is now available worldwide on Amazon. An electronic version of the book, to be distributed by Apple iBooks, is in preparation.

Tags: educational leadership, leadership, fielding graduate university, healthcare, human development, coaching

Media Psychology Student's Documentary Premieres in NYC

Posted on Wed, May 06, 2015

Catherine Seo's Research is Creating a Model for Patients to Collaborate with Their Doctors

By Marianne McCarthy

Last month, Media Psychology student Catherine Seo debuted her documentary film, “The Disease They Call FAT,” at the 1st International Symposium on Lipedema in New York City. The film was part of a two-day event in which top medical researchers, surgeons, and other medical professionals from around the world gathered in support of finding a cure for the often misunderstood (and misdiagnosed) disease.Lipedema TheDiseasetheyCallFAT

Lipedema is a fat disorder characterized by irregular fat distribution under the skin. Typically, fat is disproportionately located on the legs and hips. Painful and debilitating, it can result in immobility if left untreated. An estimated 17 million women in the United States are afflicted with Lipedema; 11% worldwide.

Driven to discover the root of her struggle with unexplainable weight gain and constant pain in her legs, Seo stumbled upon the Lipedema diagnosis in a book by Prof. Dr. Etelka Földi. When she shared her findings with her primary care doctor, who knew nothing about the disorder, he encouraged her to learn more.

“He told me I’d have to help him so he could help me,” said Seo. “I was going to learn what I needed to learn, and do whatever I had to do, in order to find out what was going on with my body, and so, that’s what I did.”

Armed with her Handycam and her research skills, she traveled around the world to interview patients and medical specialists. Her efforts culminated in the documentary film and also a website, Lipedema-Simplified.org, which is a compilation of her research and her personal experience with this disabling disease. She’s even hosted a series of online symposia with doctors that she’s met from around the world.catherine surgery3

In a system that blames obesity on the individual, her goal has been, in part, to raise awareness so that those with Lipedema can stop blaming themselves. Through a partnership with Dr. Mark Smith, director of The Friedman Center for Lymphedema Research & Treatment at Mount Sinai Beth Israel, they created The Lipedema Project, which helps patients form collaborations with their doctors to learn more about their health and what treatment options exist.

“I’m hoping that my experiences provide a model for empowering people to take control of their own health in a way that they can get the kind of collaboration and partnership that they need with their health care providers,” said Seo.catherine photo

She believes that people with any kind of disorder have a lot to contribute to the understanding of it.

“We have a very top-down autocratic health care system. The idea of a patient group being able to collaborate with professional health care clinicians and researchers is unheard of in the health care system,” she said.

During her research, Seo began to realize that the anti-fat bias is deep-rooting in the health care system.

“People are blamed by the media. They are blamed by their health care providers because there’s an underlying assumption that it’s controllability—that the reason that you’re overweight is because you eat too much. Well, it’s much more complex than that,” said Seo.

For her dissertation research (expected completion January 2016), she is exploring how deeply women's lives are impacted by cultural distortions of women and their bodies. She admits that she was also quick to blame herself at first, even though she was doing all the right things. Healthcare professionals either explicitly or implicitly reinforced her self-assessment. 

As Seo finalizes her dissertation on media’s influence on women and the idealization of body image, she is exploring self-compassion meditation as an intervention because “so many of us try so hard to change ourselves to meet some external value structure.”

Her work won’t stop there though. She and Media Psychology Faculty Member Karen Dill-Shackleford have submitted a research grant proposal focused on improving body image dissatisfaction.

“Understanding the psychology of how media is projected, how it’s consumed, how it’s integrated into our culture, is the leading edge of what’s happening,” Seo said.

A preview of “The Disease They Call FAT” can be view at http://lipedemaproject.org/premiere2015. The full version will be available in June 2015.

Click to learn more about Fielding's Media Psychology program. 

Tags: Media psychology, women's issues, adult learning, fielding graduate university, healthcare

Living Donor Advocates for Better Organ Donation Policies

Posted on Tue, Oct 08, 2013

Vicky Young, PhD

Alumna describes “ripple effect” that changed her life

By Marianne McCarthy

In the midst of working on her PhD in PhD in Human and Organizational Systems, Vicky Young (HOS ’07) made a life-altering decision to donate one of her kidneys to a long-time friend and colleague. While she doesn’t regret her decision, she was unprepared for the personal consequences of the procedure and has since become a powerful advocate for living donors’ voices—a commitment that began with her doctoral research.

A self-proclaimed non-traditional student who preferred independent study, Vicky entered the HOS doctoral program because the Fielding model worked with her style of learning. In 2004, she was struggling with her health at the same time she was working on her dissertation. While refining a completely separate research question, her mentor suggested she study what was already shaping her life—her recent kidney donation.

“I was searching for ways to cure my depression, when I found out that I had very low kidney function,” she says. 

Vicky wanted to examine how organ donation affects people, so she based her dissertation research on the experiences of 12 other living donors. As she interviewed her subjects, she realized that they, like herself, felt disenfranchised by the process.  

“There are informed consents forms when you go through the process of trying to donate. You’re supposed to be interviewed by a social worker. You’re supposed to have an independent donor advocate. You’re supposed to be told about the possibility of complications, but not everybody has the same understanding of things,” says Vicky.

Four years after donating she was diagnosed with stage 3 chronic kidney disease, which is characterized by moderately reduced kidney function, the most severe being stage 5. Yet, complications like depression and reduced kidney function were never discussed as possible consequences. Because of this, it’s been her mission to get more information into the hands of potential donors before they make that crucial decision as well as to advocate for research on the psycho-social, health, and financial consequences of organ donation.

After working on the Living Donor Committee of the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) for three years, Vicky was appointed in March 2013 to the board of directors. UNOS is contracted by the federal government and is the only organization that oversees the transplant industry in the United States. As a voting member, Vicky will partake in organ transplant policy decisions, such as a proposed policy allowing an HIV-positive donor give to an HIV-positive recipient.

“I’ll try to look at policy issues from the professional manner of being an academic, being somebody who teaches human development, who looks at social systems, and of course, bring in my voice as living donor and the voices of the other living donors that I know across the country,” says Vicky who continues to monitor her lowered kidney function.

Currently a faculty member of Prescott College in Arizona, Vicky weaves her experience into the classroom.

“I try to bring in race, ethnicity, power, privilege, all of those things, and give people examples of disenfranchised and under-represented groups,” says Vicky, adding that Native Americans, Hispanics, and African-Americans in our country have a high rate of kidney disease, often as a result of diabetes. “So we look at socio-economic issues, poverty issues, education issues, all of those things have these ramifications.”

While Vicky remains devoted to ensuring that the voices of living donors are more prominent despite her own health struggles, she has no regrets.

“I’m a spiritual person. Did all of this happen for a reason? It changed my life and changed my direction. It was like throwing a pebble in the pond and getting the ripple effect,” says Vicky.

Tags: social justice, higher education, healthcare, human rights, graduate education, research

Alumnus Uses Organizational Skills to Improve Quality of Life for Native Americans

Posted on Wed, Feb 22, 2012

Dr. John CastilloI come from Apache heritage on my father’s side. I grew up in Compton, but my family moved to Orange County during the Watts riots when I was in second grade. I went from a black community to a white community. This transition was a defining moment in my life, influencing my choice to use my organizational skills to help the Native American community.

John Castillo (HOD '00) is the Executive Director of Walking Shield Inc., a non-profit organization based in Lake Forest, CA that is dedicated to improving the quality of life for American Indian families.

"While I was a graduate student, Fielding’s unique learning opportunities supported my efforts to create and sustain these successful collaborations—and continue to influence my work at Walking Shield," said Dr. Castillo.

John's goal is “to work on a statewide initiative to build a pipeline for Native American students to attend college.

"For Native Americans, there is a 50% high school dropout rate. My vision for the future is to improve that statistic and work on a statewide initiative to build a pipeline for Native American students to attend college," he added.

Dr. Castillo, works closely with tribal leaders to develop and sustain programs that provide shelter, healthcare, community development support, educational assistance, and humanitarian aid to Native American communities.

Walking Shield is collaborative effort that engages American Indians and the U.S. Military in a unique partnership. Through a special program called Innovative Readiness Training (IRT), military personnel applWalkingShieldy their talents to rebuild and strengthen American Indian communities through healthcare assistance and infrastructure support. Since IRT’s inception in 1994, Walking Shield has provided training missions for the military on American Indian reservations where conditions often mimic those in third world countries.

True collaboration is a unique art form. All partners commit to common goals and objectives, work together to achieve these goals, utilize each other’s expertise, and create a win-win situation for all. Our collaboration meets these criteria. Before efforts begin, all parties agree to the goals and objectives to be achieved. Throughout the military deployment, members of the tribe work side by side with the troops, combining their efforts to achieve success. Walking Shield mitigates any problems that arise.

All partners use their talents and skills to meet the goals within a predetermined time frame. Most importantly, everyone wins. The tribe may get new roads, homes, water wells, electrical lines, or much needed healthcare assistance.

The military gets to utilize its skills and talents, which enhance deployment readiness and promotes retention. Walking Shield wins by meeting its mission—to improve the quality of life on reservations.

Dr. Castillo has taught graduate courses in social work as well as undergraduate courses on Indian Studies at California State University, Long Beach. He has published several articles about American Indians and is a sought out speaker at functions across the country. With decades of experience in program coordination and a Ph.D. in Organizational Development (Fielding), Dr. Castillo is fully dedicated to improving the quality of life on American Indian reservations. For more information about John's work, please visit www.walkingshield.org

 

Tags: social justice, multicultural, adult learning, healthcare, human rights, graduate education

'Being A Psychologist Means Being A Healer'

Posted on Mon, Apr 06, 2009

By James G. Schiller, PhD (Clinical Psychology ’08)

I began serving the New York City HIV community at St. Clare’s Hospital in 1990, I was one of the early hospital-based case managers, counseling people suffering from the stigma of Karposi Sarcoma, an HIV-related cancer that left visible marks. In 1993, I co-founded an intensive HIV case management program at Argus Community, Inc., a not-for-profit in the Bronx serving people who are HIV-positive and their loved ones. I now oversee all outpatient HIV and substance abuse mental health services for 1,000 people each year. I am a recipient of the New York Statedescribe the image Department of Health’s Dr. Nicholas Rango Award for Development of Quality Case Management Services and former co-chair of the New York State AIDS Institute Department of Health Technical Assistant Group. I have lectured at Hunter College and continue to provide local and state patient care training.

I have a bachelor’s degree from St. Anselm College and a master’s degree from Hunter College. I served as Fielding’s student body president from 1998-1999.

WHY FIELDING

When I applied to doctoral programs, I was accepted to both Fielding and another school. I chose the more traditional route but, a year later, was unhappy with the large anonymous classes, extreme competition, and minimal student or faculty interaction. I reapplied to Fielding and was accepted. My initial instinct that Fielding faculty members are scholarly, supportive, available, and genuine was correct and kept me focused until I obtained my doctorate. 

FIELDING’S IMPACT ON MY LIFE

To me, being a psychologist means being a healer. Fielding helped me to expand and clarify how I can use my day-to-day assessment and treatment skills for healing. My dissertation attachment research continues to impact my perspective on the bilateral interpersonal dynamics that exist between patients and providers in our field, informing my current research and professional mental health staff training. Fielding provided the venue to both enhance my clinical skills and acquire professional credentials, inspiring me to make more significant contributions in the fields of both mental and HIV health. 

Tags: HIV, psychology, AIDs, adult learning, clinical psychology, healthcare, graduate education