Points of Pride

Alumni and Faculty Author Books on Creativity, Art Therapy, Sustainability, and more!

Posted on Mon, Jul 20, 2015

The following books, authored by members of the Fielding community were published in the first half of 2015.

BrandtBookThe Three Sources of Creativity: Breakthroughs from Your Head, Heart and Gut by Betsy Siwula-Brandt  (MA, Organizational Leadership alumna)

This book offers a new way of looking at creativity, and takes a long view of approaching your creative life. The Three Sources of Creativity is not a typical self-help book. It contains a self-assessment, exemplars (modern and ancient), many illustrations, cartoons, exercises and applications tailored to the readers.  Learn how the three sources of creativity work in your life.

This book is packed with inspiring mini-stories and fresh new insights for both your personal and business life.  As a former geoscientist and current consultant, Betsy has served in many industries required to "create something from nothing"—from discovering major oil and gas fields offshore to fostering creativity in international teams—and she wants to share my expertise with you.

For more information visit http://www.threecentersofcreativity.com/author/admin/.

 

FOCUS

FOCUS! Get What You Want Out of Life by Carol-Anne Minski, PhD (Human and Organizational Systems alumna)

This book is for any woman who is standing at the threshold of change or making a decision about the future. Women that were interviewed for the book share their successes and their struggles. You will be inspired by the stories of brave women, determined to achieve their goals.

Carol’s book condenses years of documented research and proven strategies for gaining confidence and overcoming fear. The powerful FOCUS model provides a step-by-step pathway that anyone can use to achieve personal and professional goals.

Watch the video about Carol’s book:  https://youtu.be/KQ3NyY25eSU.

 

Becoming An Art Therapist by Maxine Borowsky Junge, PhD (Human and Organizational Systems alumna)

ArtTherapyIn her eight book since graduating from Fielding, Maxine covers issues in supervision and mentorship, contains stories by art therapy students about what they are thinking and feeling, and letters to young art therapists by highly regarded professionals in the field. The reader has the advantage of ideas and responses from both a student art therapist and an art therapist with many years' experience and is clearly intended for students aiming for a career in therapy.

More information about the book can be found on the publisher’s website, http://www.ccthomas.com/details.cfm?P_ISBN13=9780398090739.

 

A New Psychology for Sustainability Leadership by Steve Schein, PhD (Human and Organizational Systems alumnus)

ScheinIn this book, Schein explores the deeper psychological motivations of sustainability leaders. He shows how these motivations relate to overall effectiveness and capacity to lead transformational change and he explores the ways in which the complexity of sustainability is driving new approaches to leadership. Based on current reviews, the book appears to be opening a new type of discussion about sustainability leadership that could lead to deeper change.

Drawing on interviews with 75 leaders in more than 40 multinational organizations, NGOs, and academia, Schein explores how ecological worldviews and conscious mindsets are developed and expressed in the context of global sustainability practice. By empirically grounding key theories from developmental psychology in sustainability leadership practice, the Schein encourages us to think about leadership in a different way.

For more information visit http://www.greenleaf-publishing.com/productdetail.kmod?productid=4068.

 

GillespeBookThe Anatomy of Death: Notes from a Healer's Casebook by Elena Gillespie, PhD (Human Development alumna)

Elena Gillespie had no idea that her father's death would lead to a door that contravenes everything we think we know about death and dying. Promising her father that that she would learn everything she could about this process, she approached her visionary experiences with the open mind of the researcher.  

While serving as an alternative counselor and Reiki practitioner, Elena worked with the dying. She wrote her dissertation on her transpersonal experiences with the dying, discovereing along the way that death is not to be feared, but may be the beginning of the next great adventure.

Read more at http://www.amazon.com/The-Anatomy-Death-Healers-Casebook/dp/0692403841>

 

Rural_GeniusRural Genius 3: Secrets to Long-Term Marriages by Hilda V. Carpenter, PhD (Human Development alumna)

In the third book of a trilogy, Hilda humorously chronicles 44 years of marriage to three men. The book is a self-parody of Hilda's experiences in 3 marriages, ending with a chapter that identifies 12 lessons she learned and how she has stayed married to her current husband for 30 years.
Learn more this book and others in the trilogy at  http://hildac.wix.com/rural-genius.

Massaging the Mindset: An Intelligent Approach to Systemic Change in Education by Dr. Felecia (Wright) Nace (Educational Leadership for Change alumna)

Felecia Nace—a former teacher, a change facilitator for schools and businesses, and an education specialist for the New Jersey Department of Education—has written a book exploring the subject of systemic change in education.

Massaging_the_MindsetThis book examines the psychology behind systemic change. School leaders will be equipped to view change from a perspective that has rarely been acknowledged. The reader will begin to see change as a process, and will understand the steps needed to attain targeted goals. School leaders will also understand that before any specific changes can take shape in a school system, leaders must first develop change skill sets in staff. Then, and only then will change become a part of school culture. Once this takes place, moving initiatives forward becomes a systemic effort, and administrators will find they have less time management issues as they can then spend more time focused on being a true instructional leader.

Even though it’s written with school leaders in mind, it’s presented in layman’s terms so that families, community members and educators in various positions to easily grasp the concepts about current trends and changes in schools in the US and how each of us plays a unique role, and most importantly, a shared responsibility in the education process.”

For more information about Nace and her book, visit https://rowman.com/ISBN/9781475812145#.

Do you have a book that’s publishing soon? Send us your information and we’ll include your book in next month’s blog.

 

 

 

 

Tags: change agent, creativity, educational leadership, psychology, organizational change, Organizational development, women's issues, sustainability, leadership, fielding graduate university, human development, research

Books by faculty, students and alumni, Spring 2015

Posted on Tue, Jun 09, 2015

The following books, authored by members of the Fielding community, were published in January to May, 2015.

Leinaweaver_LR

Storytelling for Sustainability: Deepening the Case for Change by Jeff Leinaweaver (Human and Organizational Systems alumnus)

In this book, veteran sustainability strategist and alumnus Jeff Leinaweaver shows you how storytelling 'transmit resonance' and how it can lead to success or failure.  It describes techniques for using storytelling to attract attention and get better results, whether communicating statistics and priorities, advocating for change, organizing stakeholders, or building an authentic brand and community. Storytelling is an ancient practice and a priceless skill. For sustainability practitioners who want to be more strategic and have more influence in shaping a better world, it is a crucial skill to master. 

 

When The Ball Drops: An Exploratory Study Of Inner-City College Athletes And Crime: Socialization, Risk, Strategy, And Hope by Dexter Juan Davis (Educational Leadership for Change)

BallDropsAccording to Dexter Juan Davis, there has been a significant and disturbing trend of student athletes committing crimes on college campuses. Carefully using data generated from the study of these athletes, Davis utilizes interview data to determine the socialization and behavioral dynamics associated with the propensity for criminal activity by college athletes. This study focuses on emerging themes important in understanding why some athletes from similar backgrounds avoid criminal behavior and how those that run afoul of the law recover from their experiences.

 

Fielding Monograph, Vol. 4: Leadership Studies in Healthcare

“Leadership Studies in Healthcare,” is edited by Fielding Professor Marie Farrell, EdD, former visiting Professor at Harvard School of Public Health, who also served as program manager for nu

Fielding_monograph_number_4-resized-600

rsing, midwifery, and social work for the World Health Organization (WHO).

This publication includes seven recent researches from outstanding Fielding’s School of Human Organizational Development (HOD) graduates. Read more at http://news.fielding.edu/bid/105090/Fourth-Fielding-Monograph-Published-Leadership-Studies-in-Healthcare

This Fielding monograph is now available worldwide on Amazon. An electronic version of the book, to be distributed by Apple iBooks, is in preparation.

Tags: educational leadership, leadership, fielding graduate university, healthcare, human development, coaching

New Books by Fielding Students, Faculty, and Alumni (November 2014)

Posted on Mon, Dec 01, 2014

The following books, authored by members of the Fielding community, were published in October and November 2014.

What Psychotherapists Learn From Their Clients, Edited by Sherry L. Hatcher, PhD, facultydescribe the image

Hatcher recently published research that has spanned several years with some of her
former and current doctoral students. Contributors to the book include three Fielding alumni and five current doctoral students. This book represents the conclusion of over four years of Hatcher’s work on her research project that was earlier published, in part, as a journal article.

DancingThroughRainDancing Through the Rain, by Valerie Grossman (HOS ’04)

It is a narrative addressing issues we all face. Appendices speak to generational transmission and social justice and invite readers to look at points in their own lives with a series of questions. The final appendix makes a possible connection between generational transmission and social justice.

Lenten Reflections: From the Desert to the Resurrection, by Milton Lopes, Faculty EmeritusResurrection

Milton’s book is written for those of us who want to be more spiritual. Four seminal questions are posed: Where are we? What are we? Who are we? Why are we? Answers to these questions set the stage for what many spiritual masters call the purgative way, in which the Twelve-Step Program of Alcoholic Anonymous is suggested as a framework to one’s first steps into spiritual wholeness.

After by AR NealAfter, by AR Neal (ELC ’09)

Andreé Robinson-Neal, EdD, is a well-published academic writer, but she stretches her wings with her third foray into science fiction. In her newest book, the ordinary world has ended. Some call it the Rapture of the Bible. Others say aliens are responsible, while others blame terrorism. As the main character, Marlena Jacoby, reflects on her husband's faith tradition and beliefs, she and her friends start seeing parallels between what is going on around them and what the Bible seems to suggest. Follow Marlena's journey of self-discovery and redemption as she discovers what happens "After."

Do you have a book that’s publishing soon? Send us your information, and we’ll include your book in next month’s blog.

Tags: social justice, fielding faculty, graduate education, human development

New Books by Fielding Students, Faculty, and Alumni (October 2014)

Posted on Wed, Oct 29, 2014

The following books, authored by members of the Fielding community, were published in September and October 2014. The collection includes nonfiction, fiction, and self-help titles and depicts the diverse knowledge and skills within the Fielding community.

NewRulesforWomenNew Rules for Women, by Anne Litwin, PhD (HOS ’08)

Organizational Development Consultant Dr. Anne Litwin recently published a book on gender dynamics that influence women’s workplace relationships. According to Litwin, research shows that many women struggle in their workplace relationships with other women. These struggles can be frustrating for women—and a bottom-line concern for employers. Litwin exposes the sources of confusion and misunderstanding between women colleagues and offers powerful tools for preventing and resolving conflict that result in better relationships, as well as increased productivity and retention.

The Story of Christianity, by Jean-Pierre Isbouts, DLitt (faculty)Christianity Cov v11 Stained Glass REV 335x400

In his fourth National Geographic book, faculty member Jean-Pierre Isbouts chronicles of Christian civilization from ancient Rome to today. Covering more than 2,000 years, from the birth of Jesus to the modern day, Isbouts examines the dynamic interplay of religion, politics, economics, and geography as they impacted the development and spread of Christianity. His thorough research weaves a historical narrative that provides context for biblical events without bias and with a deep respect for all traditions.

AstonishedEyeThe Astonished Eye, by Tracy Knight, PhD (PSY ’91)

Tracy Knight takes the story of one man's search for his identity and blends it into a tale of fantasy, mystery and science fiction, with all the charm of a modern American fable. Born and raised in Carthage, Illinois, Knight is a clinical psychologist and university professor at Western Illinois University. His short fiction has appeared in numerous anthologies in a variety of genres, including suspense, mystery, science fiction, western, and horror. 

The Art of Activation, by Ramona Hollie-Major, EdD (ELC ’08)Art of Activation

In a world where self-doubt and pity run rampant, a group of authors have joined forces to enlighten readers in the ways of self-love and success. Dr. Hollie-Major is one of 24 writers who provide action steps to gaining success in business, attaining wealth, having loving and harmonious relationships, helping the less fortunate, or discovering personal health and wellness.

 

Recognize cover 2Recognize: The Voices of Bisexual Men, by H. Sharif Williams (HOD ’06)

This collection of short fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, personal narratives, critical essays, and visual art produced by 61 bisexual men was co-edited by H. Sharif Williams (aka Dr. Herukhuti). He is an activist, researcher, artist, and founder of the Center for Culture, Sexuality, and Spirituality. As a revolutionary scholar, he promotes erotic empowerment, social justice, and ecological wellness as human rights.

 

 

Do you have a book that’s publishing soon? Send us your information and we’ll include your book in next month’s blog.

Tags: bisexuality, creativity, LGBTQ, religion, workers rights, organizational change, Organizational development, human development

Doctoral Students Stay Connected and Get Things Done!

Posted on Fri, Jun 20, 2014

Anchor Group Stays Close Through Session and Daily Emails

By Marianne McCarthy

There’s nothing simple about graduate school—especially when you do it on as an adult. Our students have busy lives that often include a job, family, and other commitments, not to mention all the activities that come with them!

“It’s easy to disconnect from school. Other things come in the way and they are all huge priorities,” says doctoral student Dohrea Bardell. “To maintain focus, you need people around you to constantly remind you.”

Dohrea, who runs a Seattle-based manufacturing company with her husband, is one of six members of the Getting Things Done (GTD) group. These Human & Organizational Development (HOD) students originally met at a New Student Orientation (NSO) in 2011. Dohrea and the other members of the group have found that staying connected with each other helps them stay on top of their coursework and their degree progress.

IMG 7440 cropped resized 600

Getting Things Done group members (from left to right): Dohrea Bardell, Holly Bardutz, Trevor Maber, Susan Miele, Don Khouri, and Sam Jama.

The group’s name comes from the book, Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity by David Allen, a veteran coach whose premise is: productivity is directly proportional to our ability to relax.  It made a profound impact on one of the member’s coaching practice, and the group adopted the name because they decided they were going to get things done!

Daily Emails Keep them on Track

At NSO, the GTD members spent a lot of time on the Lifelines component, analyzing each other’s milestones and really getting to know each other.  After returning home, they initiated a system of daily emails at the suggestion of their program director, Dorothy Agger-Gupta. Since then, each member has taken one day out of every week to compose a message to the rest of the group. As a result of this daily contact, they have developed a strong bond, despite their distance.

 “With a daily connection and constant contact with Fielding peers, doctoral work becomes an integral part of your everyday thoughts. You’re constantly reminded about the work that you have to do, but also feel a part of the community via a virtual community,” says GTD member Sam Jama who lives and works in Canada.

Their daily messages comprise something personal or something very practical for the program.

“Whatever you want, even little tips or jokes.” says Holly Bardutz, “I have two kids and a job, but the emails remind me every day that this is part of my life too, and I have to keep going.”

Staying connected with each other has a profound impact on their success, admits Professor Agger-Gupta, who says that students who stay closely connected to others throughout their program benefit from the collegiality and have a greater tendency to complete their program.

“You could go through this program and have little to no contact with anyone else,” says Canadian Trevor Maber. “Some people are great at that, but I like to socialize. I need that connection. I need that sense of belonging.”

Group Collaborates on Coursework

GTD members contracted, designed, and executed several of their Knowledge Areas (KAs) together. Deciding that it’s better to go through courses together than apart, they leverage resources, take turns interviewing faculty, and collectively select the literature.

Susan Miele is raising a teenaged daughter and managing a human resources team at a technology company while working toward her doctorate. For her, working on coursework together was beneficial. “It’s easy to get distracted when you have your own individual deadline versus when you have five other people who are committed to the same timelines.”

“I wonder how people without the support network do it,” says Don Khouri, an executive coach for the technology and healthcare industries in New England and New York. “I’ve talked to other folks who struggle because they don’t have some of the logistical and process knowledge about HOD that we gained from someone in our group.”

Session Has More Meaning

Summer Session is just around the corner and all six members are slated to meet in Chicago this July.

“I don’t think I would come as often as I do if I didn’t know these people,” says Holly. “Knowing that they will be there is what motivates me to come here, and I’m more comfortable.”

GTD group members use their collective bandwidth to capitalize on all the opportunities Session presents. They attend different workshops, then come back together and share what they learned.  They benefit from discussing and debating these concepts and ideas from within their various viewpoints.

“In some ways we are a very divergent group and that brings a lot of richness to our experience in that we bring different perspectives and backgrounds,” says Trevor.  “It challenges us in other ways. If the six of us all lived in Phoenix and agreed on everything, I don’t know if we’d have the same experience.”

Group Provides Emotional Support

GTD group

 “Most people don’t know what it means to get a PhD, not to mention what Fielding is like,” says Susan. “As much as my husband and daughter are supportive they have no idea. They just know I’m busy all the time.”

“I view GTD as a group of lifelong friends. We have really built that bond. It’s not just Fielding stuff we’re talking about on a daily basis; it’s life stuff,” says Don.

The GTD Group of Six” is in the midst of an amazing learning journey, and I know that the strength and insight they each bring to this group will enable them to thrive when they all become the “GTD Group of Six PhDs!” says Professor Agger-Gupta.



Tags: adult learning, Distributed education, national session, graduate education, human development, distance education, learning

Winter Session Attendees Explore Homelessness in Paradise

Posted on Mon, Feb 10, 2014

Fielding tours Santa Barbara Housing Facilities

By Marianne McCarthy

National Sessions provide a great opportunity for Fielding students to get a practical view of social change in action. As our community gathers in one geographic area, we often dedicate a day to investigate first-hand how agencies within a local community address issues such as worker’s rights, poverty, and other social issues.

This January, during the Winter Session, Fielding’s School of Human & Organizational Development (HOD) organized a day-long field trip and evening symposium called “Homeless in Paradise.” Approximately 20 Fielding students and faculty members visited shelters and low-income housing projects and learned how local agencies and nonprofits tackle homelessness in a city that is considered by many to be paradise. Later that evening, a panel of local officials and agency directors addressed the general public on innovative policies and partnerships that lead to effective and transformative programs. They were joined by recent HOD graduate, Michael Wilson, PhD, whose work with The Phoenix Centre in British Columbia exemplifies the benefits of building a socially innovative community that can respond to the complex and interconnected issues of homelessness.

Developing Transitional Opportunities

Despite its reputation for locals with wealth and fame, Santa Barbara surprisingly ranks in one of the lowest categories for affordable housing. Rob Fredericks, deputy director of the Santa Barbara City Housing Authority, attributes this to the community’s high rental prices and low vacancy rates.

“The need is not only to provide shelter to those on the streets, but also to house seniors and a work-force that can’t afford to rent at market rates,” explained Fredericks, who cited a waiting list of over 7,500.

Fredericks led the Fielding group on a tour that progressed from shelters and supportive housing programs to low-income residences, demonstrating how a local in need might transition from homelessness to greater independence.

At the 200-bed Casa Esperanza, we learned how the struggling shelter has had to change its model to survive. According to Executive Director Mike Foley, the nonprofit recently merged with the Community Kitchen and changed from an open shelter to one that mandates sobriety, to keep dollars flowing.

Our next stop was Transition House, an emergency shelter for victims of domestic violence which also provides long-term housing and supportive services for individuals and families. By offering mental health, case management, and career development services, the nonprofit works to address the issues that lead to homelessness.

Executive Director Kathleen Bauske expressed that since “children of the homeless are more likely to be homeless as adults,” it’s important to break the cycle.

“Combining services with housing helps get people to integrate back into society,” added Fredericks.

Artisan Court, Santa BarbaraThis type of model is also proving successful for Peoples’ Self-Help Housing, a regional nonprofit that provides affordable housing to 5,000 low-income children, adults, and seniors.  By providing constituents with supportive services such as youth education, skill development, and income counseling, its programs are helping marginalized individuals gain greater self-sufficiency.

But these agencies can’t do it alone. They rely heavily on federal redevelopment dollars (which area disappearing), in-kind donations, and thousands of volunteers to make ends meet.

Overcoming the NIMBY factor

According to Fredericks, one of the challenges that cities around the country are facing is “Not In My Back Yard.”

As we toured these facilities, scattered throughout the downtown area, it quickly became evident that design matters. All the residences are clean, quiet, and well-kept. Low street-front profiles and groomed landscaped help them blend into their neighborhoods, many of which are residential.

As he reiterated throughout the tour, it's important to landscape and maintain properties to keep public support. "If you give people a nice place to live, they're going to take care of it. If they take care of it, the public is going to support it.”

Making a Difference Takes Collaboration

If there was a theme for the day, it was collaboration. And on this, the panel at the evening symposium all agreed.

Homeless in Paradise Panel

Panel participants included (Left to right) Michael Wilson, Kathleen Bauske, Mayor Helene Schneider, Rob Federicks, and Supervisor Doreen Faar. They all agreed that creating effective and enduring partnerships between public and private agencies and garnering community support are the essential ingredients to building successful and innovative programs that help people transition out of homelessness. You can view the entire presentation online.

“If we can produce socially beneficial initiatives on the community level, we can do the same on a global level,” said Wilson.

Special Thanks

Fielding would like to express its gratitude to everyone who took time away from their busy schedule to provide us with an informative and meaningful exploration of their city’s approach to homelessness. In particular we thank Rob Fredericks, City of Santa Barbara Housing Authority; Micki Flacks, County of Santa Barbara Housing Authority;  Mike Foley, Casa Esperanza; Kathleen Bauske, Transition House; Kristen Tippelt, Peoples’ Self-Help Housing; Doreen Farr, Santa Barbara County 3rd District Supervisor; Helene Schneider, Santa Barbara Mayor; Michael Wilson, The Phoenix Centre; and The Santa Barbara Trolley Company

Tags: social justice, fielding graduate university, human rights, human development, habitat