Points of Pride

Latest Books from Faculty, Students, and Alumni, Fall 2015

Posted on Wed, Sep 23, 2015

The following books were recently released for publication. 

Comm-Military

A Communication Perspective on the Military 
by Michelle Still Mehta, PhD (Human and Organizational Systems alumna) 

This book reflects upon the ways the meaning of war is communicated in private lives, social relations, and public affairs. It focuses on three broad areas of concern: communication in the military family; the military in the media; and rhetoric surrounding the military. Michelle co-authored Chapter 7, "Work/Family Predicaments of Air Force Wives: A Sensemaking Perspective."

 

The Wiley Blackwell Handbook of Psychology, Technology and Society, co-edited by Nancy Cheever, PhD (Media Psychology alumna)

Edited by three of the world's leading authorities on the psychology of technology, including media psychology alumna Nancy Cheever, this new handbook provides a thoughtful and evidence-driven examination of contemporary technology's impact on society and human behavior.

CheeverThe book reaches beyond the more established study of psychology and the Internet, to include varied analysis of a range of technologies, including video games, smart phones, tablet computing, etc. It provides analysis of the latest research on generational differences, Internet literacy, cyberbullying, sexting, Internet and cell phone dependency, and online risky behavior.

 

Successful Onboarding: A New Lens for Mid-Career Leaders by Louise Korver (Evidence Based Coaching alumna)

Newcomers often experience a sense of uncertainty and vulnerability as they establish themselves as valued members of the team. Onboarding for mid-career senior leaders is a make-it-or-break-it proposition, and to do it well takes longer than 90 days. Success requires a new approach so that executives can find the support they need for socializing into a new culture.Onboarding

This book, written by Evidence Based Coaching alumna Louise Korver, offers practical tools, lessons from experience, a troubleshooting guide, and best practice management routines to accelerate successful integration based on lessons learned by executives at large, global companies.

 

Tomorrow's Change Makers: Reclaiming the Power of Citizenship for a New Generation, by Marilyn Price-Mitchell, PhD (Human Development alumna)

Each and every day, families, schools, and communities play important roles in raising and educating compassionate young citizens. But how does this happen? How do we support young people to become their best selves in a global society?

ChangeMakersTomorrow's Change Makers by alumna Dr. Marilyn Price Mitchell reveals new and surprising research, and delivers hopeful answers. Through powerful stories of American youth who believe in democracy, equal rights, social/environmental justice, and freedom, this book shows how their civic lives were shaped by relationships and service experiences during childhood and adolescence. The book will be released on September 30, 2015.

Looking for the One and To Love Again by Colleen White, EdD (Educational Leadership for Change alumna)

Colleen White is a recent graduate and an educator who resides in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. This summer, she signed with Urban Chapters Publications, which published two African American romance novels this summer.  She also has had two poetry anthologies published.

Looking4theOneToLoveAgainIn Looking for the One, a small town, Mississippi Delta girl will begin to see the world differently, see herself differently, and see love unfold in a way she never thought it could once she realizes that she has finally found the one.  To Love Again is a romance novel with a slight twist.

All of these books are avilable at Amazon.com as well as other through other book sellers.

Do you have a book that’s publishing soon? Send us your information and we’ll include your book our next blog.

 

Tags: change agent, technology, social justice, multicultural, psychology, Organizational development, evidence based coaching, military psychology

New Books by Fielding Students, Faculty, and Alumni (November 2014)

Posted on Mon, Dec 01, 2014

The following books, authored by members of the Fielding community, were published in October and November 2014.

What Psychotherapists Learn From Their Clients, Edited by Sherry L. Hatcher, PhD, facultydescribe the image

Hatcher recently published research that has spanned several years with some of her
former and current doctoral students. Contributors to the book include three Fielding alumni and five current doctoral students. This book represents the conclusion of over four years of Hatcher’s work on her research project that was earlier published, in part, as a journal article.

DancingThroughRainDancing Through the Rain, by Valerie Grossman (HOS ’04)

It is a narrative addressing issues we all face. Appendices speak to generational transmission and social justice and invite readers to look at points in their own lives with a series of questions. The final appendix makes a possible connection between generational transmission and social justice.

Lenten Reflections: From the Desert to the Resurrection, by Milton Lopes, Faculty EmeritusResurrection

Milton’s book is written for those of us who want to be more spiritual. Four seminal questions are posed: Where are we? What are we? Who are we? Why are we? Answers to these questions set the stage for what many spiritual masters call the purgative way, in which the Twelve-Step Program of Alcoholic Anonymous is suggested as a framework to one’s first steps into spiritual wholeness.

After by AR NealAfter, by AR Neal (ELC ’09)

Andreé Robinson-Neal, EdD, is a well-published academic writer, but she stretches her wings with her third foray into science fiction. In her newest book, the ordinary world has ended. Some call it the Rapture of the Bible. Others say aliens are responsible, while others blame terrorism. As the main character, Marlena Jacoby, reflects on her husband's faith tradition and beliefs, she and her friends start seeing parallels between what is going on around them and what the Bible seems to suggest. Follow Marlena's journey of self-discovery and redemption as she discovers what happens "After."

Do you have a book that’s publishing soon? Send us your information, and we’ll include your book in next month’s blog.

Tags: social justice, fielding faculty, graduate education, human development

MA-CEL Alumna Invited to White House to Receive Presidential Arts Funding

Posted on Thu, Aug 14, 2014


By Marianne McCarthy

Malissa Cindy Rachel with captionWhen Principal Rachel Clark Messineo (MA-CEL, ’08) received an invitation to the White House this past May, she knew her school had been chosen as a recipient of an arts education initiative that could help make a difference in her school. But the students of Burbank Elementary and the rest of San Diego didn’t know for sure until they watched the event streaming live from the White House. Of course, they couldn’t be more proud and excited, as are we at Fielding.

Burbank Elementary is one of only 35 schools across the nation to participate in the Turnaround Arts Initiative, an assistance program that provides training, development, and workshops to ensure that the arts are an available avenue to success for all students.

Underperforming School Struggles to Change

Led by the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities, together with local partners, Turnaround Arts aims to help failing schools implement high quality arts education to “turnaround” the pervasive problems found in high-poverty, chronically underperforming schools. By using the arts as a strategic tool, students are engaged while they learn 21st century skills critical to their success.

Burbank Elementary is located in the “Barrio Logan” area of San Diego, serving 350 students, all of whom are socioeconomically disadvantaged. In 2010, it was identified as performing in the lowest 5% of all California schools.Burbank Elementary

 “We’ve been a chronically under-performing school for many years working hard to make a difference, but our scores just go up a tiny bit each year, so it’s hard work. Our kids are low income, second-language learners, part of a very transient population. There are lots of things working against us, but we’re really hoping that integrating arts will be an avenue to attract students to stay at our school,” says Rachel.

She explains that due to limited funding Burbank Elementary doesn’t offer any on-going activities like some of the other more affluent schools in her district. When funds get cut, it’s usually the arts and extracurricular activities that go first. Burbank doesn’t have funds to provide anything other than the core classes: reading, science, math, and history. Kids who struggle in these areas typically don’t want to come to school, says Rachel.

“If we had an acting class, or a singing class, or a dance class, they’d be more excited about coming to school and could learn through song or dance. They could learn through acting, building sets, things like that.  So we’re looking at integrating arts as a way to improve our academics which will ultimately improve self-esteem, confidence, and attendance…maybe we could even become a school of choice for new students.”

Believing in the Value of Arts Education

She believes that there is a connection between arts education and academic achievement. She has a personal connection and passion for arts education as she has played the flute, piccolo, and piano since elementary-school age. She has experienced first-hand how arts education increases student motivation, confidence, and teamwork.

Associated with the school since 2009, Rachel has moved up the ladder from teacher to grant coordinator to just last year being appointed principal.

“As I began my journey toward an administrative position, I started utilizing materials that I had learned at Fielding. It just kept sinking in deeper and deeper,” says Rachel.  “Now that I’m a principal, I frequently draw upon the readings, the books, the activities, and the collaborative tasks that were assigned. Facilitators said, ‘Trust the process,’ and several years later, I see what they meant.”

Turnaround Arts Equips Teachers with Powerful Tools

TurnaroundArtslogoAccording to the Turnaround Arts website, placing the arts as the heart and soul of a school gives leadership and teachers powerful tools to improve school climate and culture, increase student and parent engagement, which ultimately contributes to improved academic achievement and the successful turnaround of a failing school.

Obamas KidsTurnaround Arts began as a pilot program with eight schools, and celebrating that success is what the White House event was all about. First Lady Michelle Obama hosted a talent show in the East Room of the White House, which was transformed into an old fashioned school auditorium. Students from the program’s inaugural schools showed off their skills singing, dancing, making music, and reciting poetry. The First Lady also announced the expansion of the program, from eight pilot schools to 35 schools, 10 from California. Celebrities Sara Jessica Parker and Alfre Woodard, artist-mentors who were paired with one of the original eight schools, were there to help promote the event. President Barack Obama even made a surprise appearance before the show concluded—and Rachel and her superintendent got to shake his hand at the event.

Burbank Gets Assigned an Artist-Mentor

This month, Burbank Elementary meets their new artist-mentor, Grammy award-winning musician Jason Mraz, who lives in the San Diego area. Mraz will work with Rachel and Burbank teachers to infuse the arts into curriculum and campus culture over the next three years.

“We have planned to learn how to play the guitar and ukulele, and Jason plays both!” says Rachel.  “Our hope is that we can have a concert with him at the end of the year with students all playing one of his songs.”

Mraz said in a statement, “I’m humbled by the opportunity to support and represent a school in our country and my local community that will greatly benefit from the support of a vibrant arts education program. The arts are the key to life and the Turnaround Arts program will open the doors for youth to life, love, creativity and endless imagination.”


Tags: art education, change agent, social justice, educational leadership, diversity, multicultural, arts, fielding graduate university, graduate education, teacher education, MA-CEL

Winter Session Attendees Explore Homelessness in Paradise

Posted on Mon, Feb 10, 2014

Fielding tours Santa Barbara Housing Facilities

By Marianne McCarthy

National Sessions provide a great opportunity for Fielding students to get a practical view of social change in action. As our community gathers in one geographic area, we often dedicate a day to investigate first-hand how agencies within a local community address issues such as worker’s rights, poverty, and other social issues.

This January, during the Winter Session, Fielding’s School of Human & Organizational Development (HOD) organized a day-long field trip and evening symposium called “Homeless in Paradise.” Approximately 20 Fielding students and faculty members visited shelters and low-income housing projects and learned how local agencies and nonprofits tackle homelessness in a city that is considered by many to be paradise. Later that evening, a panel of local officials and agency directors addressed the general public on innovative policies and partnerships that lead to effective and transformative programs. They were joined by recent HOD graduate, Michael Wilson, PhD, whose work with The Phoenix Centre in British Columbia exemplifies the benefits of building a socially innovative community that can respond to the complex and interconnected issues of homelessness.

Developing Transitional Opportunities

Despite its reputation for locals with wealth and fame, Santa Barbara surprisingly ranks in one of the lowest categories for affordable housing. Rob Fredericks, deputy director of the Santa Barbara City Housing Authority, attributes this to the community’s high rental prices and low vacancy rates.

“The need is not only to provide shelter to those on the streets, but also to house seniors and a work-force that can’t afford to rent at market rates,” explained Fredericks, who cited a waiting list of over 7,500.

Fredericks led the Fielding group on a tour that progressed from shelters and supportive housing programs to low-income residences, demonstrating how a local in need might transition from homelessness to greater independence.

At the 200-bed Casa Esperanza, we learned how the struggling shelter has had to change its model to survive. According to Executive Director Mike Foley, the nonprofit recently merged with the Community Kitchen and changed from an open shelter to one that mandates sobriety, to keep dollars flowing.

Our next stop was Transition House, an emergency shelter for victims of domestic violence which also provides long-term housing and supportive services for individuals and families. By offering mental health, case management, and career development services, the nonprofit works to address the issues that lead to homelessness.

Executive Director Kathleen Bauske expressed that since “children of the homeless are more likely to be homeless as adults,” it’s important to break the cycle.

“Combining services with housing helps get people to integrate back into society,” added Fredericks.

Artisan Court, Santa BarbaraThis type of model is also proving successful for Peoples’ Self-Help Housing, a regional nonprofit that provides affordable housing to 5,000 low-income children, adults, and seniors.  By providing constituents with supportive services such as youth education, skill development, and income counseling, its programs are helping marginalized individuals gain greater self-sufficiency.

But these agencies can’t do it alone. They rely heavily on federal redevelopment dollars (which area disappearing), in-kind donations, and thousands of volunteers to make ends meet.

Overcoming the NIMBY factor

According to Fredericks, one of the challenges that cities around the country are facing is “Not In My Back Yard.”

As we toured these facilities, scattered throughout the downtown area, it quickly became evident that design matters. All the residences are clean, quiet, and well-kept. Low street-front profiles and groomed landscaped help them blend into their neighborhoods, many of which are residential.

As he reiterated throughout the tour, it's important to landscape and maintain properties to keep public support. "If you give people a nice place to live, they're going to take care of it. If they take care of it, the public is going to support it.”

Making a Difference Takes Collaboration

If there was a theme for the day, it was collaboration. And on this, the panel at the evening symposium all agreed.

Homeless in Paradise Panel

Panel participants included (Left to right) Michael Wilson, Kathleen Bauske, Mayor Helene Schneider, Rob Federicks, and Supervisor Doreen Faar. They all agreed that creating effective and enduring partnerships between public and private agencies and garnering community support are the essential ingredients to building successful and innovative programs that help people transition out of homelessness. You can view the entire presentation online.

“If we can produce socially beneficial initiatives on the community level, we can do the same on a global level,” said Wilson.

Special Thanks

Fielding would like to express its gratitude to everyone who took time away from their busy schedule to provide us with an informative and meaningful exploration of their city’s approach to homelessness. In particular we thank Rob Fredericks, City of Santa Barbara Housing Authority; Micki Flacks, County of Santa Barbara Housing Authority;  Mike Foley, Casa Esperanza; Kathleen Bauske, Transition House; Kristen Tippelt, Peoples’ Self-Help Housing; Doreen Farr, Santa Barbara County 3rd District Supervisor; Helene Schneider, Santa Barbara Mayor; Michael Wilson, The Phoenix Centre; and The Santa Barbara Trolley Company

Tags: social justice, fielding graduate university, human rights, human development, habitat

A Life of Activism and Advocacy: Supporting Exiles and Survivors of Sexual Violence

Posted on Tue, Nov 26, 2013

By Marianne McCarthy

Indira K. Skoric, PhD

Few people can say they were on the front lines of societal change, especially if it dealt with a cultural taboo.  Yet, humanitarian Indira K. Skoric (HOS ’12) proudly witnessed the alteration of a long-standing sentiment about women subjected to sexual violence during the Yugoslav Wars and a system that tolerated such abuses.  A victim of sexual violence herself, she has consistently advocated for those subjected to systematic rape and torture during the war. It took over a decade, and the work of countless other advocates, but finally women survivors were legally labeled “civilian victims of war in Bosnia and Herzegovina.”

Indira was living and studying in Belgrade during the Yugoslav National Movement when she first became involved with feminist groups. In 1991, she helped establish the Belgrade Women in Black, an antimilitarist peace movement protesting the war in Serbia and all forms of hatred, discrimination, and violence.  According to the group’s website, it has organized more than 500 protests throughout the former Yugoslavia since its founding.Belgrade Women in Black

After the war started, Indira joined the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies as an information officer.

“I wanted to do something tangible for people who were survivors and victims of the war,” she said.

Many of these victims were the unacknowledged sufferers of sexual violence. Years later, Indira would write in her dissertation that post war reports estimated that 10,000 to 60,000 women had been submitted to sexual violence during the war, although the European Commission settled on a figure 20,000.

While one part of her felt devoted to working with people who were minorities like herself or those who were working on gender issues, another wanted to escape the violence and the intense political climate of ethnical and territorial conflict.

In 1994, Indira found her way out of Yugoslavia after winning a fellowship at the New School for Social Research in New York. She continued her activism with the American Friends Service Committee and a New York branch of Women in Black. But pressure was building from the war in Kosovo, and she received threats to her life. Many of her Women in Black colleagues had been forced into hiding. Eventually, she was granted political asylum and was able to complete her master’s degree in International Relations, writing her thesis on “Understanding War Rapes.” It was a topic she would continue to explore during her time at Fielding.

In the meantime, Indira focused on survivors of sexual violence and refugees of the former Yugoslavia. She consulted on the documentary film, Calling the Ghosts. The Emmy-award winning documentary reveals the torture and humiliation of women in concentration camps in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Directed by Mandy Jacobson in 1996, it also won the Human Rights Watch Int'l Film Fest and Nestor Almendros Award for best documentary.

Indira also co-founded the Reconciliation and Culture Cooperative Network (RACOON, Inc.), an organization she would eventually direct until 2011, raising over $1.5 million to assist in community-building programs for an estimated 250,000 Western Balkan refugees and exiles in the New York and tri-state area.

Indira Skoric and staff of Reconciliation and Culture Cooperative Network (RACOON, Inc.)

“We were mostly political activists,” said Indira, “but early on, we realized that these refugee populations not only needed a conflict resolution program, but they also needed someone to help them navigate complexities in the system and advocate for them.”

Indira describes how things became especially difficult for immigrants after 9/11. “People couldn’t get social security numbers, and so they would end up in the category of aliens, or illegals,” even if they were awaiting a “legal” status.

Her organization began working on issues such as advocating for health care and ensuring her constituents could get the care they needed in their native language. In 2004, RACOON, Inc. received the Union Square Award for grassroots activism that strengthens local communities.

Reconciliation and Culture Cooperative Network (RACOON, Inc.)“The organization that started as a conflict transformation group, thinking how do we reconcile in exile, ended up providing advocacy and networking,” said Indira. “As part of the leadership, I was pushed in a place that I needed to learn how to navigate, not only practically but also strategically. Fielding provided that place for my own learning and growth, to be able to lead this small organization.”

Intrigued by women, like herself, who used their experiences to “transform their lives and even emancipate themselves from the horror that haunts them,” her Human and Organizational Systems research focused on the life stories of nine women survivors of and advocates against sexual violence. In a way, it was her way to seek greater understanding of her own growth.

Then, in 2007, the Law on the Protection of Civilian Victims of War in Bosnia and Herzegovina was amended to include victims of rape. By essentially garnering women who had been raped during the war status of civilian war victims, they became eligible for disability, health care, and professional rehabilitation. It was a “huge” moment for Indira.

According to her dissertation committee chair, Richard Appelbaum, "Indira's life and work bear witness to Fielding's concern with social justice—with putting theory into practice. Her dissertation was a powerful exploration into the lives of women who were severely traumatized, yet who used their pain and sorrow to devote their energies to helping other women similarly afflicted.”

A recipient of multiple Fielding scholarships, Indira’s research contributes to the literature on “emancipatory learning by revealing how these women created the conditions for their own survival, and adds to the literature of feminist studies.” Indira has organized and presented at numerous international seminars, conferences and United Nations meetings. During her doctoral studies, she was a fellow in Fielding’s Institute for Social Innovation and was named Revson Fellow by Columbia University. Her article “Advocacy and Survivors of Sexual Violence” is set for publication in Canadian Oral History in the spring of 2014.

In addition to being assistant professor at Kingsborough Community College, Indira currently sits on the board of the Women’s Refugee Commission, a research and advocacy group that accomplishes life-changing improvements for vulnerable displaced populations. 


Tags: change agent, social justice, diversity, women's issues, graduate fellows, violence, human rights, scholar activist

Living Donor Advocates for Better Organ Donation Policies

Posted on Tue, Oct 08, 2013

Vicky Young, PhD

Alumna describes “ripple effect” that changed her life

By Marianne McCarthy

In the midst of working on her PhD in PhD in Human and Organizational Systems, Vicky Young (HOS ’07) made a life-altering decision to donate one of her kidneys to a long-time friend and colleague. While she doesn’t regret her decision, she was unprepared for the personal consequences of the procedure and has since become a powerful advocate for living donors’ voices—a commitment that began with her doctoral research.

A self-proclaimed non-traditional student who preferred independent study, Vicky entered the HOS doctoral program because the Fielding model worked with her style of learning. In 2004, she was struggling with her health at the same time she was working on her dissertation. While refining a completely separate research question, her mentor suggested she study what was already shaping her life—her recent kidney donation.

“I was searching for ways to cure my depression, when I found out that I had very low kidney function,” she says. 

Vicky wanted to examine how organ donation affects people, so she based her dissertation research on the experiences of 12 other living donors. As she interviewed her subjects, she realized that they, like herself, felt disenfranchised by the process.  

“There are informed consents forms when you go through the process of trying to donate. You’re supposed to be interviewed by a social worker. You’re supposed to have an independent donor advocate. You’re supposed to be told about the possibility of complications, but not everybody has the same understanding of things,” says Vicky.

Four years after donating she was diagnosed with stage 3 chronic kidney disease, which is characterized by moderately reduced kidney function, the most severe being stage 5. Yet, complications like depression and reduced kidney function were never discussed as possible consequences. Because of this, it’s been her mission to get more information into the hands of potential donors before they make that crucial decision as well as to advocate for research on the psycho-social, health, and financial consequences of organ donation.

After working on the Living Donor Committee of the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) for three years, Vicky was appointed in March 2013 to the board of directors. UNOS is contracted by the federal government and is the only organization that oversees the transplant industry in the United States. As a voting member, Vicky will partake in organ transplant policy decisions, such as a proposed policy allowing an HIV-positive donor give to an HIV-positive recipient.

“I’ll try to look at policy issues from the professional manner of being an academic, being somebody who teaches human development, who looks at social systems, and of course, bring in my voice as living donor and the voices of the other living donors that I know across the country,” says Vicky who continues to monitor her lowered kidney function.

Currently a faculty member of Prescott College in Arizona, Vicky weaves her experience into the classroom.

“I try to bring in race, ethnicity, power, privilege, all of those things, and give people examples of disenfranchised and under-represented groups,” says Vicky, adding that Native Americans, Hispanics, and African-Americans in our country have a high rate of kidney disease, often as a result of diabetes. “So we look at socio-economic issues, poverty issues, education issues, all of those things have these ramifications.”

While Vicky remains devoted to ensuring that the voices of living donors are more prominent despite her own health struggles, she has no regrets.

“I’m a spiritual person. Did all of this happen for a reason? It changed my life and changed my direction. It was like throwing a pebble in the pond and getting the ripple effect,” says Vicky.

Tags: social justice, higher education, healthcare, human rights, graduate education, research

Alumnus Uses Organizational Skills to Improve Quality of Life for Native Americans

Posted on Wed, Feb 22, 2012

Dr. John CastilloI come from Apache heritage on my father’s side. I grew up in Compton, but my family moved to Orange County during the Watts riots when I was in second grade. I went from a black community to a white community. This transition was a defining moment in my life, influencing my choice to use my organizational skills to help the Native American community.

John Castillo (HOD '00) is the Executive Director of Walking Shield Inc., a non-profit organization based in Lake Forest, CA that is dedicated to improving the quality of life for American Indian families.

"While I was a graduate student, Fielding’s unique learning opportunities supported my efforts to create and sustain these successful collaborations—and continue to influence my work at Walking Shield," said Dr. Castillo.

John's goal is “to work on a statewide initiative to build a pipeline for Native American students to attend college.

"For Native Americans, there is a 50% high school dropout rate. My vision for the future is to improve that statistic and work on a statewide initiative to build a pipeline for Native American students to attend college," he added.

Dr. Castillo, works closely with tribal leaders to develop and sustain programs that provide shelter, healthcare, community development support, educational assistance, and humanitarian aid to Native American communities.

Walking Shield is collaborative effort that engages American Indians and the U.S. Military in a unique partnership. Through a special program called Innovative Readiness Training (IRT), military personnel applWalkingShieldy their talents to rebuild and strengthen American Indian communities through healthcare assistance and infrastructure support. Since IRT’s inception in 1994, Walking Shield has provided training missions for the military on American Indian reservations where conditions often mimic those in third world countries.

True collaboration is a unique art form. All partners commit to common goals and objectives, work together to achieve these goals, utilize each other’s expertise, and create a win-win situation for all. Our collaboration meets these criteria. Before efforts begin, all parties agree to the goals and objectives to be achieved. Throughout the military deployment, members of the tribe work side by side with the troops, combining their efforts to achieve success. Walking Shield mitigates any problems that arise.

All partners use their talents and skills to meet the goals within a predetermined time frame. Most importantly, everyone wins. The tribe may get new roads, homes, water wells, electrical lines, or much needed healthcare assistance.

The military gets to utilize its skills and talents, which enhance deployment readiness and promotes retention. Walking Shield wins by meeting its mission—to improve the quality of life on reservations.

Dr. Castillo has taught graduate courses in social work as well as undergraduate courses on Indian Studies at California State University, Long Beach. He has published several articles about American Indians and is a sought out speaker at functions across the country. With decades of experience in program coordination and a Ph.D. in Organizational Development (Fielding), Dr. Castillo is fully dedicated to improving the quality of life on American Indian reservations. For more information about John's work, please visit www.walkingshield.org

 

Tags: social justice, multicultural, adult learning, healthcare, human rights, graduate education

HOD Faculty Member Exemplifies the Essence of the Scholar-Activist

Posted on Thu, Mar 05, 2009

School of Human & Organizational Development (HOD) doctoral faculty member Christine GT Ho, PhD, received Fielding’s Social Justice Award at Winter Session 2013.

ChristineHo

By Christine G.T. Ho, PhD
Faculty, School of Human & Organizational Development

For 25 years, I have been a migration scholar studying border crossing (literal and metaphoric), migration theory, immigrant adaptation, and transnationalism. I am also a globalization scholar, studying the workings of the capitalist global economy, the inequality it produces worldwide, and its impact on cultures around the world. I have published two books, Salt Water Trinnies (AMS Press, 1991), and Globalization, Diaspora and Caribbean Popular Culture (Ian Randle Publishers, 2005). I am currently writing a book that reframes immigration discourse away from violations of law to the recognition of globalization as a powerful engine of economic restructuring.

I am one of only two anthropologists at Fielding, a career that came from my interests in cultural differences, social inequality, and concerns about social injustice based on race, ethnicity, and gender. I taught these subjects at several universities before coming to Fielding, where I helped found the Structural Inequality and Diversity knowledge area and the concentration in Transformative Learning for Social Justice. I now serve on the Diversity and Social Justice governance team.

WHY FIELDING?

When I joined Fielding, I was looking for challenges beyond teaching undergraduates.  Fielding was the ideal solution, not only because of its dedication to adult learning but also its strong commitment to diversity and social justice. Fielding aspires to the ideals of social justice and understands its impact and importance.

ADVICE TO PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS

If you are a prospective student wishing to produce social change, then I highly recommend you choose Fielding. Fielding is strongly committed to diversity and social justice, and many faculty members are knowledgeable about globalization, which has touched all human beings on this planet whether or not they are aware of it.

Tags: globalization, social justice, diversity, multicultural, graduate education