Fielding Graduate University News

Policing Black and Brown Communities: Dynamics of Race, Class and Gender

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Wed, Jul 15, 2015

Policing Black and Brown Communities: A Discussion about Dynamics of Race, Class and Gender

SS15_Ed_Series_graphic-policeIn the current national conversation about police activity and brutality, especially in low income neighborhoods of people of color, we recognize that there are intersecting issues of racial classification, economic class, as well as gender and gender expression at work on our streets. Through a panel of local experts and activists on various aspects of this situation, along with Fielding Graduate University faculty, a discussion titled Policing Black and Brown Communities: Dynamics of Race, Class and Gender will focus on the debate over the right-wrong, police-citizen, for police-against police debates to a deeper analysis. Understanding the historical relationships between identified groups (eg. racially, economically, gender-based) and law enforcement in this country can help us more clearly identify paths of action to promote social justice for all peoples, rather than demonizing them based on categorical status.

As part of its National Summer Session in Rosemont, IL, Fielding Graduate University invites the extended Chicago community to this educational discussion tonight, Wednesday, July 15, 2015 from 7–9 pm at the Westin O’Hare in Rosemont, IL. This event is free and open to the public.

GUEST PANELISTS

Monique W. Morris, EdD

monique-1Morris is an author and social justice scholar with more than 20 years of professional and volunteer experience in the areas of education, civil rights, juvenile and social justice.  Dr. Morris is the author of Black Stats: African Americans by the Numbers in the Twenty-First Century (The New Press, 2014), Too Beautiful for Words (MWM Books, 2012); and Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools (The New Press, 2016), a forthcoming book on the criminalization of Black girls in schools. She has written dozens of articles, book chapters, and other publications on social justice issues and lectured widely on research, policies, and practices associated with improving juvenile justice, educational, and socioeconomic conditions for Black girls, women, and their families.

Morris is co-founder of The National Black Women’s Justice Institute; a lecturer for Saint Mary’s College of California and an adjunct professor for the University of San Francisco. She is a 2012 Soros Justice Fellow, the former vice president for Economic Programs, Advocacy and Research at the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and the former director of Research for the Thelton E. Henderson Center for Social Justice at the UC Berkeley Law School. Morris has also worked in partnership with and served as a consultant for state and county agencies, national academic and research institutions, and communities throughout the nation to develop comprehensive approaches and training curricula to eliminate racial/ethnic and gender disparities in the justice system. Her work in this area has informed the development and implementation of improved culturally competent and gender-responsive continua of services for youth.

Morris’ research intersects race, gender, education and justice to explore the ways in which Black communities, and other communities of color, are uniquely affected by social policies. Among other publications, Morris is the author of "Representing the Educational Experiences of Black Girls in a Juvenile Court School" (Journal of Applied Research on Children, 2014); "Sacred Inquiry and Delinquent Black Girls: Developing a Foundation for a Liberative Pedagogical Praxis" (In Understanding Work Experiences from Multiple Perspectives, edited by G.D. Sardana and Tojo Thatchenkery, 2014); Educating the Caged Bird: Black Girls and the Juvenile Court School (Poverty & Race, PRRAC, 2013) and Race, Gender and the School to Prison Pipeline: Expanding Our Discussion to Include Black Girls (African American Policy Forum, 2012). Her 2008 study, A Higher Hurdle: Barriers to Employment for Formerly Incarcerated Women (UC Berkeley School of Law), which is one of the first testing studies to examine the impact of a criminal record or period of incarceration on the employment outcomes of women, was referenced in a special report commissioned by Congressman Danny K. Davis (D-IL).

Morris is a member of the OJJDP National Girls Institute Expert Panel and the California Board of State and Community Corrections’ Committee on Reducing Racial and Ethnic Disparity. She is also an advisory board member for Global Girl Media, Oakland and regular contributor to Ebony.com.

Chairty Tolliver

Tolliver is the Founder and Project Director of Black on Both Sides. A seasoned and nationally recognized youth development specialist, Tolliver grew up in the Englewood neighborhood of Chicago. She is a foster mother, writer, and spoken word artist, and former director of one of the largest and oldest organizing groups in Chicago, Southwest Youth Collaborative. In over thirteen years in the field of Youth Development, she has worked on campaigns on a broad range of issues, including fair housing, labor rights, school reform, prison reform, and LGBT youth rights. In 2012 she was selected as one of seven activists nationwide to receive the Alston Bannerman Fellowship, and is a 2013 George Soros Senior Justice Fellow. Charity identifies as a Black woman and mother, and uses feminine pronouns. She is not youth-identified, although the UN Declaration on the Rights of Youth might disagree.

Chacyln Hunt

Hunt is an attorney and police misconduct organizer in Chicago and works with youth of color and their experiences with police. Her project integrates civil rights education with research and legal strategy driven by the kids' everyday experiences with law enforcement. The students she works with participate in role plays and produce interviews with their classmates. We (a group of professionals) spend months with the kids learning from them, and helping them gain a critical distance from their experiences in order to advocate for police accountability.             

For more information about this and other Fielding Educational Series sessions, please visit fielding.edu/events.

Tags: gender empowerment, EdD, Education Doctorate, diversity, organizational change, conversation, leadership, adult learning, national session, fielding graduate university, human rights, criminal justice

President of The Chicago School of Professional Psychology (TCSPP) Patricia Arredondo, EdD, to Discuss Latina Feminism

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Tue, Jul 14, 2015

Patricia Arredondo, EdD, to Discuss Latina Feminism at the Fielding Educational Series in Rosemont, IL

Latinas in the U.S. are in the process of claiming their power through higher education while navigating cultural divides in personal and professional relationships and in other social contexts.

SS15_Ed_Series_graphic-heart_ArredondoOn Wednesday, July 15, 2015 from 4–6 pm at the Westin O’Hare in Rosemont, IL, the Chicago Campus President of The Chicago School of Professional Psychology (TCSPP) Patricia Arredondo, EdD will discuss how Latina feminism influences peoples relationship-oriented cultural worldview and sense of fairness and social justice. As part of its National Summer Session in Rosemont, IL, Fielding Graduate University invites the extended Chicago community to join this educational presentation sponsored by Fielding’s Worldwide Network for Gender Empowerment, titled Leading from the Heart and Cultural Roots. This event is free and open to the public.                                                                                  

Latina feminism is influenced by our relationship-oriented cultural worldview and sense of fairness and social justice. This feminist framework is rooted in historic events that place a value on education, community engagement, and compassion. Latinas in the U.S. are in the process of claiming their power through higher education while navigating cultural divides in personal and professional relationships and in other social contexts. Dr. Arredondo will present concepts and models, often invisible to Latinas themselves that contribute to our sense of identity and empowerment.

About Patricia Arredondo, EdD

Arredondo_Commencement_PhotoPatricia Arredondo, EdD, became Chicago Campus President of The Chicago School of Professional Psychology (TCSPP) in February 2013. She joined the school after successfully serving in senior administrative roles with the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and Arizona State University. Additionally, she led an organizational consulting firm addressing diversity in the workplace in Boston for 13 years. As of June 2015, she has assumed a new position with TCSPP as Senior Advisor for Institutional Initiatives.

In the academic world, Arredondo is a national leader and scholar on many fronts, extensively published in the areas of multicultural competency development, immigrant issues in counseling, counseling with Latinas/os, women’s leadership and, organizational diversity. She has authored more than 100 referred journal articles, book chapters, and training videos and is regularly invited for keynote addresses nationally and internationally. Her latest book, Culturally Responsive Counseling for Latinas/os was published in 2014 by the American Counseling Association (ACA) Press. Currently, Arredondo is also co-principal Investigator on a three-year training grant from the National Science Foundation that advances women of color in the STEM fields to administrative opportunities at Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Tribal Colleges. She considers herself a social justice advocate and an educator at heart.

Civic and professional organization leadership is visible throughout Arredondo’s career. She served as president of four national associations, among these was the American Counseling Association (ACA), the largest counseling association in the world. She is the only Latina to serve in that position. Arredondo was also president of the American Psychological Association Division 45 - Society for the Psychological Study of Ethnic Minority Issues, the Association of Multicultural Counseling and Development of the ACA and the founding president of the National Latina/o Psychological. In the civic arena, Arredondo has always been active in community activities. Among her leadership roles were president of the Board of Family and Children’s Services in Boston, on the board of the Diversity Leadership Committee for the City of Phoenix, Vice-Chair of the Social Development Commission for Milwaukee County, the largest anti-poverty organization in Wisconsin, and more recently she was appointed to the Advisory Board for DiversityMBA Magazine in Chicago. She chairs the Board of Professional Affairs for the American Psychological Association.

Arredondo has been the recipient of many awards and recognitions throughout her career. Many of these awards acknowledge her as a “pioneer” or change agent in her profession. She is the 2013 recipient of the prestigious Henry Tomes Award for Distinguished Lifetime Contributions to the Advancement of Ethnic Minority Psychology, the “Living Legend” award from the ACA, the Lifetime Achievement Award from APA Division 45, the Madrina Award by the National Latina/o Psychological Association, and an honorary degree from the University of San Diego; she also holds Fellow status with the American Counseling and American Psychological Associations. She enjoys promoting women’s leadership, mentoring graduate students, emerging professionals, entrepreneurs, and individuals who want to make a difference on behalf of others.

Arredondo holds degrees from Kent State University, Boston College, and Boston University. She is a licensed psychologist and bilingual in English and Spanish. Arredondo is extremely proud of her Mexican American heritage. Arredondo is family-centered and enjoys her extended family engagements across the country.

 For more information about all of the Fielding Educational Series please visit https://www.eventbrite.com/e/fielding-educational-series-summer-2015-registration-17487812518.

Tags: EdD, social justice, educational leadership, diversity, sociology, leadership, adult learning, fielding graduate university, human rights, learning

Fielding Selected as a 2015 Best Value School Award Recipient

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Thu, May 21, 2015

Fielding Graduate University has been selected out of nearly 8,000 postsecondary schools as the recipient of a Best Value School award.

Best Value Award 2015The award is issued by University Research & Review (URR) (https://www.urandr.org/about-us), a company dedicated to improving the process of how a student selects a postsecondary school.

“Given Fielding’s focus on providing affordable and personalized graduate education through our technologically-advanced face to face learning model, we are truly honored to receive the Best Value School award for a second consecutive year,” noted Fielding President Katrina Rogers, PhD.

President Rogers accepted the award on behalf of the university from URR founder Joseph Schmoke. "It is our distinguished pleasure to present the award to Fielding Graduate University," Schmoke states. "We hope current students and alumni take pride in this honor and anyone searching for a quality, reasonably priced college education strongly considers Fielding."

The committee that reviewed more than l00 nominees out of the thousands of eligible schools is made up of former university presidents, CEOs, provosts and professors. Schools cannot pay to receive the award; it has to be earned through the nomination and committee evaluation process. Fielding was chosen by the committee because it passed rigorous standards including a combination of cost, accreditation, variety and quality of school programs, and student satisfaction with the institution.

President Rogers added, “Here at Fielding, we hold ourselves to the highest educational standards to foster individual development, community collaboration and societal engagement. We are proud to be recognized for the true value we bring to our students’ educational careers.”

“Our committee prides itself on combining our extensive experience, knowledge of postsecondary education and insight into what provides students with good value when selecting a Best Value award recipient,” said Schmoke.

Fielding will retain the Best Value School designation for one year. Award recipients must re-qualify every year.

 URR medallion 2015BV medallion 2015

Tags: educational leadership, leadership, adult learning, higher education, fielding graduate university, graduate education

Alumni Track: Coaching Strategies to Help Women Leaders Thrive

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Wed, Apr 23, 2014

describe the imageThe Fielding Alumni Council invites you to attend in the Third Annual Alumni Track offered at the 2014 All Schools National Summer Session.

The Alumni Track aims to bring more alumni to National Session and broaden advanced learning, collaboration, and success, for Fielding alumni scholars and practitioners. This year’s Alumni Track is packed full of intellectually stimulating topics that are relevant across all schools and is designed to build a community of practice through relationships within the Alumni Track.

All sessions are open to all alumni, students, and faculty. Check the schedule for dates and times. Registration is required. (See below for registration information)

The following session is one of eleven sessions being offered at this years All Schools National Session on Friday, July 18, 2014 from 9:30 - 10:45 am.

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Getting Back on Track: Coaching strategies to help women leaders thrive in the face of derailment

by Kevin Nourse, PhD (HOD '09), and Lynn Schmidt (HOD '09)

The primary purpose of this session is to share insights from research we conducted subsequent to our Human and Organizational Development (HOD) experience that extends and integrates our research. In doing so we seek to achieve three key outcomes:

  1. Help Fielding students, alumni, and students who are executive coaches become more effective in their work supporting the success of women leaders
  2. Inspire Fielding students to extend our research with their own dissertations
  3. Demonstrate to existing Fielding students how two HOD alumni have integrated the Fielding experience and partnered to continue learning and advancing the integration of scholarship and practice

There were a number of factors that prompted us to focus on the topic of career derailment, executive coaching and resilience. First, both of us had a compelling need to leverage the time and energy we invested in our dissertations into thought leadership materials that could help a primary focus of our professional practices – women leaders. Since we have interviewed nearly two dozen executive coaches to learn how they worked with women leaders facing derailment to help them thrive, both of us came away with great insights on alternative practices we could use with our own clients.

Second, this research project (and subsequent book we are writing) provided a great way to collaborate post-doc and rekindle the connection we had while at Fielding. In addition, it’s a great way to reconnect with other Fielding colleagues who we have long lost touch – as well as new students and alum who we have yet to meet.

Finally, this effort has prompted us to transition back into a learning mindset as we revisit our original research, review what other scholars have discovered since we completed our dissertations, and integrate new discoveries from our research efforts.

Our real hope is that in offering this session, we can create an on-going network of coaches who have passion and energy for supporting the growth and success of women leaders.

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Kevin Nourse, PhD

Principal, Nourse Leadership Strategies

www.nourseleadership.com

 Lynn Schmidt resized 600  

Lynn Schmidt, PhD

HR Talent Management Leader, Group Health Cooperative

   

 More about Kevin and Lynn:

  • We are both practicing coaches (Lynn is an internal coach and Kevin is an external coach); thus, we can speak to the practical application of our research.
  • The topic represents the integration of our HOD dissertation research (Lynn explored career derailment among senior women leaders and Kevin conducted research on resilience among middle managers who experienced Hurricane Katrina).
  • We are both seasoned presenters/speakers; both of us are skilled at engaging our audiences and using interactivity to enhance participants experiences.
  • An increasing number of coaches focus on building resilience in leaders they coach.
  • Despite all that is known about women in leadership and the challenges they face, relatively few are currently in the senior most positions of organizations; our research specifically focuses on women leaders.
  • Lynn has authored several publications on talent management and leadership.

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We hope you will take the opportunity to meet like-minded colleagues from other disciplines, build your professional network, and enjoy your time on our "virtual campus."

Alumni attend sessions and events at a discounted fee of $150. This allows access to various seminars and events scheduled by any of the three schools along with all alumni events. Registration closes promptly at 9:00 am PDT on Friday, May 2, 2014. After that date a late fee of $50 will apply.

For more information and to register, click here:  http://web.fielding.edu/events/

Tags: women's issues, leadership, adult learning, fielding graduate university, human development

Future Faces of Fielding: Finding Fractal Fraternity

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Fri, May 24, 2013
Written by HOD student Barton Buechner

BartonFuture Faces of Fielding: Finding Fractal Fraternity

Reflections of New Student Orientation

The spring New Student Orientation (NSO) 2013 cohort of the Fielding Graduate University School of Human & Organizational Development (HOD) began with evident embodiment of diversity. Like a view through a kaleidoscope, each turn of the lens displayed patterns not previously apparent. After a week of enmeshment with faculty and student anchors, patterns of unity emerged as well, amid aspirations and predictions of growth and new discoveries.

The faces and places of this NSO also reflected Fielding’s strategic direction and drawing power; India and Great Britain via Egypt and Dubai, crossing north and south borders of Canada and Mexico, German-New York fusion and Santa Barbara Celtic, just touching upon a few exemplars of global mélange in the room.  In one exercise organized by Susan Herrmann, participants tossed a tennis ball to each other with a greeting in their first or second non-English language, and passed instructions in intersecting tongues. The common language became laughter.  Later, it was music, with three talented singers and a poet in the house.  The outgoing interim dean of HOD, Margo Okazawa-Rey, bestowed the title of “beloved” to the new entrants, imprinted on a maroon and gold lanyard adorning each, lei-like as yet another symbol of sprouting unity.

Anticipations of emerging reality, and realities – holding a new passport to learning.  Standing at the shore of a great sea, feeling like fish. Envisioning yoga for the mind, body and spirit: stretching, pushing, balancing. Leaving behind corporate pathologies for integral healing. Bald ambition of anticipated growth. Are we evolving yet?

We learned of new HOD program direction as Dottie Agger-Gupta takes the helm: Fielding is getting lean, no more deans. What will that mean? Tackling the task of learning the “new normal” of a Moodle-powered approach to scholarly collaboration from others just learning as well, the Spring NSO cohort absorbed presentations delivered for the first time in the new format and language as Felix fades. Faculty and student anchors resisted temptation to describe the comfortable "old ways" as we made sense of the new, together.  Previously unfamiliar six-syllable words entered the conversation, and terminologies of diversity. Memories of the cold water of the “deep end” of pre-NSO gave way to forward motion of being in the swim.

In small groups, the metaphoric concept of “journey” grew legs in the sharing of spiritual pathways, intellectual meandering, and driving passion. Stories of quests and conquest, mysteries and revelations, and often deep pain came forward and merged in the growing “we-space” of community. Skeptical glances and furtive, longing gazes out the window at the Santa Barbara sea, sand and skyscapes became fewer, as attention and intention came into focus. As we inquired appreciatively, gifts were uncovered, explored, and shared. Commonalities built bonds, differences bespoke latent collaborations.  

Like all NSO cohorts before, the group heard from the (sometimes wild) horse’s mouths of thosedon bushnell at nso resized 600 ahead of us on this pathway. The Funky Pelican in search of the Red Fish. Seated around the fishbowl, second-person stories of scholars yet to meet, sages with gifts yet unimagined. Legends from the misty time of Casa de Maria, rituals of the fish and dolphins, learning to see in the other’s eyes the image of the “Changing Woman” of Chumash lore.  Venerable Fielding godfather Don Bushnell spoke of the deep empirically-based and well-researched meaning underlying the “Fielding” identity, and the equally profound legacy of merry mischief, embodied by his much-anticipated “bubble dance.” 

Much inspired, the class of spring 2013 returned the favor with satirical skits, featuring the sincere flattery of faculty emulation. Sly caricatures were met with knowing nudges and occasional howls as suckers were savored around the circle. What began days earlier with a staid and scholarly cocktail party ended as a dance of celebration.  Singing and dancing; reflective, contemplative, anticipatory.

On parting, more reflections. 

The heady and liberating transition from high-powered executive to being a student again…. And finding out how to hold both going forward. Balancing the need to manage, drive, make things happen with a gentler and contemplative questioning. 

Previously clear goals now in question, dissolving to make space for something greater, yet still unknown. We brought too much baggage, set some aside to make space. Travel lightly on this path, pick up the stones and feathers that speak to you.

The existential angst of password resets tempered with the comfort of no longer being alone in the digital universe.  Doubts erased. Open to love and be loved.   The privilege of privileged information. To see each other for the first time. Going forward, we take each other with us.  Who am I among these? Somebody….

The embodiment of our companions is more than the words on paper would have led us to believe. There is wisdom in that, the opening of an eye.

With that eye opening, we soHOD NSO spring 2013 group photo resized 600mehow find unexpected comfort in resting in the mystery of not knowing….yet….

Finally, love and appreciation for Jerry, the Snow atop the mountain of wisdom we are getting ready to climb. 

Thank you to Jerry Snow for the photos. Click here to view album.

Barton Buechner came to Fielding because of its reputation for “activism, transformation, and scholarly engagement.”  The military veteran had retired from the US Navy in 2008 and enrolled in Fielding in 2009, with a generally-framed academic agenda that has since gained shape and focus.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tags: adult learning, fielding graduate university, graduate education, human development

Fielding's School of Human & Organizational Development European Cluster Working with Media Evolution City in Sweden

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Fri, Mar 29, 2013

Fielding’s Malmö Jam at Media Evolution City in Sweden: Learning, Sharing, Action, & Building Communities of Purpose

Malmö, Sweden, May 30 – June 2, 2013

malmo sweden resized 600

Members from all areas of the Fielding learning community are gathering for this dynamic learning session. Led by Human and Organizational Development (HOD) faculty facilitators Fred Steier and Dottie Agger-Gupta, the learning model for the event can be linked to foundational and advanced knowledge area assessments in systems, praxis, media, and other specialized studies. 

This conference is set to take place in Media Evolution City. For this event, HOD European cluster and co-connects Heidi Forbes öste and Sergej Van Middendorp, developed the concept for this conference with global media leaders who are affiliated with Media Evolution. The Media Evolution Community is a membership-based community of media related companies, large and small.  Their mission is to foster connections and collaboration between innovators, entrepreneurs, companies and universities.  It is a dynamic example of an emerging and new form of organizing and collaboration fit for our 21st century challenges. One of the key challenges facing such collaborative communities is the ability to move beyond the community of interest and the community of practice to form communities of purpose. The purpose is to solve particular client challenges, often in temporal organizations, without resorting to old forms of enterprise and organization that stifle opportunities for solutions. Participation will be both face-to-face and remotely via GoToMeeting. 

Malmo Jam: Click here for more information.

See the following links for more information on the Media Evolution participants:
Media Evolution: Where the Media Industries meet for Innovation and Growth: http://www.mediaevolution.se

Members from Academia, Digital games, Film, Communications,
Learning, Media technology, Music, Public sector, Publishing, TV, and the Web: http://www.mediaevolution.se/en/members

The May 30 and 31st sessions are reserved for Fielding students and alumni. Guests and potential students are welcome to join June 1 and 2. To pre-register please email: dotagger@fielding.edu.


**There is no registration fee, but all participants and guests are encouraged to pre-register no later than March 31, 2013**

Please email Dottie by March 31 to pre-register for in-person or remote participation: dotagger@fielding.edu.

Tags: international, adult learning, fielding graduate university

Host Dr. Connie Corley of "Experience Talks" Interviews Musician/Author/educator Christine Stevens

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Wed, Dec 05, 2012

Christine Stevens resized 600Featured musician for the Sixth Annual International Conference on Positive Aging, Christine Stevens, interviewed by Dr. Connie Corely on radio show "Experience Talks"

Christine Stevens is the author of a new book, MUSIC MEDICINE: THE SCIENCE OF HEALING YOURSELF WITH SOUND.  

Stevens is an internationally acclaimed speaker, author, and music therapist. Holding masters degrees in both social work and music therapy, Stevens inspires people all over the world with her message of music for holistic health, spirituality and wellness. Stevens is the author of Music Medicine, The Healing Drum Kit, and The Art and Heart of Drum Circles book and DVD. She has recorded two play-along CDs; Reviving Rhythms, and Drumming Up Diva.

Stevens is the founder of UpBeat Drum Circles, offering diversity training, teambuilding, and wellness presentations world-wide. She has trained facilitators and led workshops in more than twenty countries, including Iraq, Hong Kong, Brazil, South Africa, Japan, and Western Europe.

Stevens trains HealthRHYTHMS facilitators throughout the United States, England and Japan through Remo, the world's largest drum company. A leader in the music and wellness movement, Christine also serves on the editorial board of Explore: A Journal of Science and Healing

Stevens will be appearing at the Sixth Annual International Conference on Positive Aging, February 10 - 12, 2013, in Los Angeles. 

 

Dr. Connie Corley, MSW, PhD, producer and host of "Experience Talks"

Connie CorelyDr. Corley is a Professor at Fielding Graduate University and California State University Los Angeles (and Associate Director of Lifelong Learning, Applied Gerontology Institute).  She completed her graduate degrees at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She holds certification from the Center for Mind-Body Medicine in Washington, DC and is adjunct faculty at Saybrook University. Dr. Corley's 100+ publications and national/international presentations have spanned the fields of aging and the arts, geriatrics, rehabilitation, spirituality, and substance abuse.  She  has been a mentor in Geriatric Social Work Initiatives funded by the John A. Hartford Foundation, and also a mentor in the New Ventures in Leadership program of the American Society on Aging (ASA). She is a fellow of the Gerontological Society of America (GSA) and the Association for Gerontology in Higher Education (AGHE), Past President of the Association for Gerontology Education in Social Work (AGE-SW),  a recipient of the AGE-SW Leadership Award, and in 2004 was the Inaugural recipient of the West Coast Gerontological Social Work Career Award from the Institute for Geriatric Social Work.  Cal State LA named Dr. Corley a Distinguished Woman in 2008. She is in "Who's Who in America” and “Who’s Who of American Women.” 

 


Tags: gerontology, international, adult learning

Preparations are set for the Sixth Annual International Conference on Positive Aging in Los Angeles, CA in February 2013

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Thu, Nov 29, 2012

PACCommunity members and renowned experts gather to shape confident future for aging population.

Featuring keynote speaker Wendy Lustbader, MSW, live webinar with Ram Dass, award recognition for Dr. James E. Birren,and presentation from Dr. Brian de Vries amongst many others.


According to the U.S. Census Bureau and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, baby boomers will turn 65 at a rate of 10,000 per day for the next decade making them the fastest growing segment of the population. Future implications indicate: “tomorrow’s elderly will have quite different social, demographic, health, and economic characteristics than today’s elderly… as average length of life continues to increase, issues regarding the quality of active life expectancy are likely to assume greater importance.” In anticipation of this growing segment of our population, the Sixth Annual International Conference on Positive Aging, hosted by Fielding Graduate University’s Institute for Social Innovation, brings together notable speakers and workshop leaders to explore new and innovative approaches to positive aging. This year’s topic is “Life-Reimagined: New Approaches to Positive Aging” and the conference will take place February 10-12, 2013 at the Center for Healthy Communities at The California Endowment in Los Angeles.

The Sixth Annual International Conference on Positive Aging includes a variety of workshops that explore themes of creative expression, community, wellness, and life transitions.  Dr. Katrina Rogers, Provost of Fielding Graduate University and Senior Vice-President states:  “Positive aging promotes creativity, wellness, and growth. It means taking personal control of your life instead of being a victim or passive observer. In this model, aging presents a new opportunity for being socially active, for engaging with the community, for being productive, and for seeking a new meaning and purpose in life. This is why the conference is larger each year: people are interested about how to age well.” The conference provides opportunities to engage in physical and creative activities, including yoga, meditation, music, and connecting with others with similar interests.  Conference registration is open to the public.

Wendy Lustbader resized 600The keynote speaker for this year’s conference is Wendy Lustbader, MSW, who currently serves as Affiliate Associate Professor at the University of Washington School of Social Work. Ms. Lustbader has considerable experience working with older people, their families and caregivers, and lectures nationally on subjects related to aging.  As a medical social worker, she specialized for almost twenty years in out-patient mental health at the Pike Market Medical Clinic in Seattle, and has also practiced in a home health care agency, hospital geriatric unit, and nursing home. Ms. Lustbader’s first book was co-authored with Nancy Hooyman, Taking Care of Aging Family Members. This is a practical guide to caregiving which is still considered the best book of its kind by experts in the field of aging. At the opening reception on Sunday, February 10th, Ms. Lustbader will speak about her latest book, Life Gets Better: The Unexpected Pleasures of Growing Older.

 

Ram Dass resized 600The conference will also host a webinar with world-renowned American contemporary spiritual teacher and author Ram Dass. He is known for his personal and professional associations with Timothy Leary at Harvard University in the early 1960's, for his travels to India and his relationship with the Hindu guru Neem Karoli Baba, and for founding the charitable organizations Seva Foundation and Hanuman Foundation. His practice of karma yoga or spiritual service has opened up millions to their deep, yet individuated spiritual practice and path. Dass continues to uphold the boddhisatva ideal for others through his compassionate sharing of true knowledge and vision. His unique skill in getting people to cut through and feel divine love without dogma is still a positive influence on people all over the world.

 

BirrenPic resized 600Dr. James E. Birren is one of the "reigning pioneers" in the organized field of gerontology since the 1940s. He is a past president of The Gerontological Society of America, and author of over 250 publications. Dr. Birren will receive Fielding's Creative Longevity and Wisdom Award in recognition of his six decades of seminal contributions including the influential work on guided autobiography.

 

 

 

 

Brian de Vries resized 600Featured speaker Dr. Brian de Vries, Professor of Gerontology at San Francisco State University, and will share his extensive work on aging experiences, including bereavement among gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender adults.  He is a Fellow of the Gerontological Society of American, a member of the Leadership Council for the American Society on Aging, and co-chair of the Lesbian and Gay Aging Issues Network constituency group. Most recently, Dr. de Vries has become a policy advisor for AARP, California. 

 

 

 

Attendees include professionals in the fields of health care, insurance, life planning, care giving and lifelong learning, as well as those interested in ageism, gaining, spirituality, creativity, wellness, entrepreneurship and more.

Early registration for the three day conference is $275 until January 14th, 2013, and $300 after. Single day tickets are $125. Registration includes meals and opening reception Sunday evening.  To attend only the Sunday dinner reception featuring keynote speaker Wendy Lustbader is $80.

To register, please visit: http://positiveaging2013.eventbrite.com/#

For more information and updates about the conference, please visit the website: http://www.positiveaging.fielding.edu/

Join the Facebook page for speaker updates and event announcements: Positive Aging Conference FACEBOOK 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tags: creativity, social justice, educational leadership, diversity, religion, intentional change, conference, sociology, self-esteem, international, adult learning, higher education, fielding graduate university, human development, learning

Veteran's Advocate Brockton Hunter to speak in Santa Barbara

Posted by Ari Morguelan on Wed, Oct 31, 2012

War Pic resized 600

Fielding Graduate University is proud to host Brockton D. Hunter, a nationally recognized expert on Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) impacts on combat veterans, as he presents “Echoes of War: The Combat Veteran in the Criminal Justice System” on Thursday, November 15th from 5:00pm-6:30pm at the Santa Barbara Jury Assembly Room in Santa Barbara, 1108 Santa Barbara Street. The public is invited to attend this free presentation, made possible by an Emerging Needs Grant from the Fund for Santa Barbara and the Santa Barbara County Superior Court.

Mr. Hunter is an attorney and former Army Scout who is recognized throughout the United States for his work on behalf of veterans in criminal courts. He drafted Minnesota’s landmark Veterans Sentencing legislation and has consulted for the Obama Presidential Transition Team, the Department of Defense, and the Department of Veterans Affairs.

PTSD is recognized as a common side-effect of war: 20% of the 2.6 million Americans returning home from service in Afghanistan and Iraq are expected to suffer from its effects. Mr. Hunter will discuss the history of PTSD including ties to criminal behavior and lessons to be learned by those involved in the administration of criminal justice.  He will also examine how criminal charges serve as an opportunity to identify and assist troubled veterans, enabling them to return to their communities as assets instead of liabilities.

Veterans Treatment Courts are gaining national recognition as a tool to help identify and treat PTSD in combat veterans.  A local effort, led by the Honorable George Eskin, with support from Fielding Graduate University’s Institute for Social Innovation and other community stakeholders, is working to develop and implement the best approach to supporting Santa Barbara County veterans while protecting public safety.

The Institute for Social Innovation partnered with the Santa Barbara County Superior Court, Santa Barbara Women Lawyers, Santa Barbara County Bar Association, and the Common Ground Santa Barbara Homeless Advocacy Project to sponsor this event.  1.5 hours of MCLE Substance Abuse credit are available to attendees. Please email sbwl.admin@gmail.com for information on MCLE credit.

For more details about the event, please contact:
James Kyriaco Jr, MPA, Project Manager, Institute for Social Innovation
Phone: (805) 898-2906                              
Email: jkyriaco@fielding.edu

 **Please click here for flyer**

Tags: disaster mental health, Marketing, adult learning, Distributed education, higher education, fielding graduate university

Open research and education: Fielding alumna Gigi Johnson presents globally

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Mon, Oct 29, 2012

The first Open Knowledge Festival was held in in Helsinki from September 17th to 22nd, 2012 with over 800 participants from across the globe. This festival included a week of participatory sessions, keynote lectures, workshops, hackathons and satellite events. This years theme was Open Knowledge in Action: looking at the value that can be generated by opening up knowledge, the ecosystems of organizations that can benefit from such sharing, and the impacts transparency can have in society.

The week was organized through collaborations amongst over 100 guest planners from around the world leading 13 key Topic Streams of whom Fielding Graduate University alumna and current Fielding Alumni Council member, Gigi Johnson, EdD, (ELC '11) presented on Topic Stream 7: Open Research and Education. From her time zone southern California in the middle of the night, Gigi remotely joined team members from Mexico City, Brooklyn, and in Finland at the festival.  Gigi noted, "It went really well. We used Google Hangout to do a four city discussion while showing videos and text from our Peeragogy project. Our cohort on the ground (on-site in Helsinki) worked with our workshop participants, who had contributing new ideas to the research project based on their experiences across several countries."

To view videos of how hundreds of change-makers and experts from private, public and community sectors and helped build an international open knowledge ecosystem in Helsinki:
OK Festival

Tags: technology, educational leadership, sociology, sustainability, leadership, international, adult learning, higher education, human development, learning