Fielding Graduate University News

Fielding Awarded the Carnegie Community Engagement Classification

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Thu, Jan 08, 2015

Fielding Graduate University Awarded the Carnegie Foundation Advancement of Teaching for Community Engagement Classification

The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching has selected Fielding Graduate University as one of 240 U.S. colleges and universities to receive its 2015 Community Engagement Classification.

Carnegie CEC digital seal resized 600Colleges and universities with an institutional focus on community engagement were invited to apply for the classification, first offered in 2006 as part of an extensive restructuring of The Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. Unlike the Foundation’s other classifications that rely on national data, this is an “elective” classification—institutions participated voluntarily by submitting required materials describing the nature and extent of their engagement with the community, be it local or beyond. This approach enabled the Foundation to address elements of institutional mission and distinctiveness that are not represented in the national data on colleges and universities. “The importance of this elective classification is borne out by the response of so many campuses that have demonstrated their deep engagement with local, regional, national, and global communities,” said John Saltmarsh, director of the New England Resource Center for Higher Education (NERCHE). “These are campuses that are improving teaching and learning, producing research that makes a difference in communities, and revitalizing their civic and academic missions.”

Fielding President Katrina Rogers, PhD, noted, “Our leadership sees community engagement as one of the key values of the institution. It is reflected in our strategic plan and the ways in which Fielding manifests community engagement through its mission and educational enterprise. We define community engagement as the actions that we take as an institution and through our graduates to create positive social change using the best research and practice. Our stated values support community engagement in various ways, emphasizing community building internally and externally, diversity, learner-centered education, social justice, and transformational learning.”

Fielding Graduate University was founded in 1974 as an independent non-profit graduate school, dedicated to learning for experienced, mid-career adults. Fielding’s student population consists of 1,200 with 130 faculty members all across the United States. Long before the internet, Fielding invented a pedagogical model that enabled individuals to participate in high quality graduate learning from a distance and in small groups in their communities. Fielding’s vision then and now is based on the notion that adults deserve access to graduate learning that they can apply in their communities as they study, and not only when they finish. From the beginning, Fielding expected its students to be engaged in their communities, taking from their educational experience the more relevant theories to address local issues.

Fielding’s vision for their students role in community engagement is two-fold: 1) to build a high level of knowledge and skills for their graduates to be effective in collaboration and change work; and 2) to enact through their centers and curricula the multiple ways in which Fielding can make a contribution to society. Fielding’s community engagement-focused efforts are most apparent within Fielding’s Institute for Social Innovation (ISI). The ISI’s mission and function is to turn knowledge into action for the workplace and local communities. The programs currently under the ISI include: the Women’s Network for Gender Empowerment, the Nonprofit Leadership Certificate, the World Cafe, and Evidence-Based Coaching certificates. The ISI’s Center for Public Life, is funded by a grant from the Kettering Foundation to support the Center’s services to local non-profits in the central coast region of California.

The Foundation, through the work of the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education, developed the first typology of American colleges and universities in 1970 as a research tool to describe and represent the diversity of U.S. higher education. The Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education (now housed at Indiana University Bloomington's Center for Postsecondary Research) continues to be used for a wide range of purposes by academic researchers, institutional personnel, policymakers and others.

A listing of the institutions that hold the Community Engagement Classification can be found on NERCHE’s website.

Tags: educational leadership, organizational change, evidence based coaching, higher education, fielding graduate university, graduate education, human development, institue for social innovation, Carnegie Project

Fielding Graduate University Named Member of the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Tue, Apr 22, 2014

carnegie resized 600Fielding Graduate University President Katrina Rogers is pleased to announce that Fielding’s School of Educational Leadership for Change has been selected for inclusion in the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate (CPED).

The CPED is a consortium of colleges and schools of education who are working together on a critical examination of the doctorate in education (EdD). Fielding one of 87 institutions working in collaboration to redesign the EdD and will comprise the third cohort to join the Consortium.

In a press release from CPED Executive Director Jill A. Perry, the following was announced:

The Executive Director of the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate is pleased to announce the addition of 33 new member institutions and four additional California State System campuses. Of this new cohort, CPED will have its first international membership with two institutions from Canada and one from New Zealand. “The expansion of the Consortium to a third cohort speaks to the credibility of this faculty-led effort and to our dedication to learn from diverse settings around the US and beyond its borders as a means to develop the strongest professional preparation in education,” stated Jill A. Perry, the Executive Director.

The vision of the Consortium is to transform the EdD (referred to as a Professional Practice Doctorate within the Consortium) into the degree of choice for preparing the next generation of practitioner experts and school (K-12) college leaders in Education, especially those who will generate new knowledge and scholarship about educational practice (or related policies) and will have responsibility for stewarding the Education profession.  

This vision aligns with Fielding’s academic quality and innovation strategic objective about aligning existing degree programs with current market trends and demands of the profession and needs of society.

This initiative was led by Mario Borunda, EdD, Fielding's interim provost, along with Fielding faculty members Nicola Smith, MDA, JD, Kathy Tiner, PhD, and Anna DiStefano, EdDPresident Rogers stated, “They are to be commended for achieving this goal, which puts Fielding squarely into a national conversation on the future of education doctorates.”

About the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate (CPED)

The Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate (CPED) is a Consortium of colleges and schools of education, which have committed resources to work together to undertake a critical examination of the doctorate in education (EdD) through dialog, experimentation, critical feedback and evaluation.

The vision of the Consortium is to transform the EdD (referred to as a Professional Practice Doctorate within the Consortium) into the degree of choice for preparing the next generation of practitioner experts and school (K-12) college leaders in Education, especially those who will generate new knowledge and scholarship about educational practice (or related policies) and will have responsibility for stewarding the Education profession.

To accomplish this vision, the mission of the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate (CPED) is to improve the way in which professional educators are prepared by redesigning all aspects of EdD programs including: curriculum, assessments, admissions, etc. The CPED initiative currently has its headquarters at the School of Education at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, PA.

CONTACT:

Jill A. Perry, PhD, Executive Director   

Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate

(c) 301.204.2644 (o) 412.396.4341

jillaperry@cpedinitiative.org    http://CPEDinitiative.org

Tags: EdD, Education Doctorate, educational leadership, fielding graduate university, graduate education, Carnegie Project