Fielding Graduate University News

Policing Black and Brown Communities: Dynamics of Race, Class and Gender

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Wed, Jul 15, 2015

Policing Black and Brown Communities: A Discussion about Dynamics of Race, Class and Gender

SS15_Ed_Series_graphic-policeIn the current national conversation about police activity and brutality, especially in low income neighborhoods of people of color, we recognize that there are intersecting issues of racial classification, economic class, as well as gender and gender expression at work on our streets. Through a panel of local experts and activists on various aspects of this situation, along with Fielding Graduate University faculty, a discussion titled Policing Black and Brown Communities: Dynamics of Race, Class and Gender will focus on the debate over the right-wrong, police-citizen, for police-against police debates to a deeper analysis. Understanding the historical relationships between identified groups (eg. racially, economically, gender-based) and law enforcement in this country can help us more clearly identify paths of action to promote social justice for all peoples, rather than demonizing them based on categorical status.

As part of its National Summer Session in Rosemont, IL, Fielding Graduate University invites the extended Chicago community to this educational discussion tonight, Wednesday, July 15, 2015 from 7–9 pm at the Westin O’Hare in Rosemont, IL. This event is free and open to the public.

GUEST PANELISTS

Monique W. Morris, EdD

monique-1Morris is an author and social justice scholar with more than 20 years of professional and volunteer experience in the areas of education, civil rights, juvenile and social justice.  Dr. Morris is the author of Black Stats: African Americans by the Numbers in the Twenty-First Century (The New Press, 2014), Too Beautiful for Words (MWM Books, 2012); and Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools (The New Press, 2016), a forthcoming book on the criminalization of Black girls in schools. She has written dozens of articles, book chapters, and other publications on social justice issues and lectured widely on research, policies, and practices associated with improving juvenile justice, educational, and socioeconomic conditions for Black girls, women, and their families.

Morris is co-founder of The National Black Women’s Justice Institute; a lecturer for Saint Mary’s College of California and an adjunct professor for the University of San Francisco. She is a 2012 Soros Justice Fellow, the former vice president for Economic Programs, Advocacy and Research at the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and the former director of Research for the Thelton E. Henderson Center for Social Justice at the UC Berkeley Law School. Morris has also worked in partnership with and served as a consultant for state and county agencies, national academic and research institutions, and communities throughout the nation to develop comprehensive approaches and training curricula to eliminate racial/ethnic and gender disparities in the justice system. Her work in this area has informed the development and implementation of improved culturally competent and gender-responsive continua of services for youth.

Morris’ research intersects race, gender, education and justice to explore the ways in which Black communities, and other communities of color, are uniquely affected by social policies. Among other publications, Morris is the author of "Representing the Educational Experiences of Black Girls in a Juvenile Court School" (Journal of Applied Research on Children, 2014); "Sacred Inquiry and Delinquent Black Girls: Developing a Foundation for a Liberative Pedagogical Praxis" (In Understanding Work Experiences from Multiple Perspectives, edited by G.D. Sardana and Tojo Thatchenkery, 2014); Educating the Caged Bird: Black Girls and the Juvenile Court School (Poverty & Race, PRRAC, 2013) and Race, Gender and the School to Prison Pipeline: Expanding Our Discussion to Include Black Girls (African American Policy Forum, 2012). Her 2008 study, A Higher Hurdle: Barriers to Employment for Formerly Incarcerated Women (UC Berkeley School of Law), which is one of the first testing studies to examine the impact of a criminal record or period of incarceration on the employment outcomes of women, was referenced in a special report commissioned by Congressman Danny K. Davis (D-IL).

Morris is a member of the OJJDP National Girls Institute Expert Panel and the California Board of State and Community Corrections’ Committee on Reducing Racial and Ethnic Disparity. She is also an advisory board member for Global Girl Media, Oakland and regular contributor to Ebony.com.

Chairty Tolliver

Tolliver is the Founder and Project Director of Black on Both Sides. A seasoned and nationally recognized youth development specialist, Tolliver grew up in the Englewood neighborhood of Chicago. She is a foster mother, writer, and spoken word artist, and former director of one of the largest and oldest organizing groups in Chicago, Southwest Youth Collaborative. In over thirteen years in the field of Youth Development, she has worked on campaigns on a broad range of issues, including fair housing, labor rights, school reform, prison reform, and LGBT youth rights. In 2012 she was selected as one of seven activists nationwide to receive the Alston Bannerman Fellowship, and is a 2013 George Soros Senior Justice Fellow. Charity identifies as a Black woman and mother, and uses feminine pronouns. She is not youth-identified, although the UN Declaration on the Rights of Youth might disagree.

Chacyln Hunt

Hunt is an attorney and police misconduct organizer in Chicago and works with youth of color and their experiences with police. Her project integrates civil rights education with research and legal strategy driven by the kids' everyday experiences with law enforcement. The students she works with participate in role plays and produce interviews with their classmates. We (a group of professionals) spend months with the kids learning from them, and helping them gain a critical distance from their experiences in order to advocate for police accountability.             

For more information about this and other Fielding Educational Series sessions, please visit fielding.edu/events.

Tags: gender empowerment, EdD, Education Doctorate, diversity, organizational change, conversation, leadership, adult learning, national session, fielding graduate university, human rights, criminal justice

Was Jesus a Political Zealot or Grassroots Activist? Specialists Differ in this Exciting Fielding Event

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Mon, Jan 06, 2014

Two prominent specialists on the historical Jesus, Reza Aslan and Jean-Pierre Isbouts, will address the question: Was Jesus a political zealot or a grassroots social activist?

Fielding Graduate University is proud to present the first of five free and open to the public Fielding Educational Series presentations featuring two prominent specialists on the historical Jesus, Reza Aslan and Jean-Pierre Isbouts, who will square off on this exciting panel discussion over the question: was Jesus a political zealot, or a grassroots social activist?Ad

This discussion will be facilitated by Fielding faculty member, Rich Appelbaum, PhD, on Tuesday, January 7 from 7:00- 9:00 pm at the Fess Parker’s Doubletree Resort, 633 East Cabrillo Boulevard, Santa Barbara, CA 93103.   

The Fielding Educational Series features select presentations that are timely and relevant to current social issues from the scholarly fields of human and organizational development, psychology, and educational leadership and change. 

Reza Aslan

Reza Aslan resized 600Reza Aslan, an internationally acclaimed writer and scholar of religions, is author of the #1 New York Times Bestseller Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth. He is the founder of AslanMedia.com, an online journal for news and entertainment about the Middle East and the world, and co-founder and Chief Creative Officer of BoomGen Studios, the premier entertainment brand for creative content from and about the Greater Middle East.

Aslan's degrees include a Bachelor of Arts in Religious Studies from Santa Clara University (Major focus: New Testament; Minor: Greek) , a Master of Theological Studies from Harvard University (Major focus: History of Religions), a PhD in the Sociology of Religions from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and a Master of Fine Arts from the University of Iowa, where he was named the Truman Capote Fellow in Fiction. An Adjunct Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, he is also a member of the Los Angeles Institute for the Humanities and the Pacific Council on International Policy. He serves on the board of directors of the Ploughshares Fund, which gives grants for peace and security issues; Narrative Four, which connects people through the exchange of stories; PEN USA, which champions the rights of writers under siege around the world; and the Levantine Cultural Center, which builds bridges between Americans and the Arab/Muslim world through the arts.

Aslan's first book is the International Bestseller, No god but God: The Origins, Evolution, and Future of Islam, which has been translated into thirteen languages, and named one of the 100 most important books of the last decade. He is also the author of How to Win a Cosmic War (published in paperback as Beyond Fundamentalism: Confronting Religious Extremism in a Globalized Age), as well as editor of two volumes: Tablet and Pen: Literary Landscapes from the Modern Middle East, and Muslims and Jews in America: Commonalties, Contentions, and Complexities.

Born in Iran, he lives in Los Angeles with his wife (author and entrepreneur Jessica Jackley) where he is Associate Professor of Creative Writing and Cooperating Faculty in the Department of Religion at the University of California, Riverside. His previous academic positions include the Wallerstein Distinguished Professor of Religion, Community and Conflict at Drew University in New Jersey (2012-2013), and Visiting Assistant Professor of Religion at the University of Iowa (2000-2003).

Jean-Pierre Isbouts

Jean PierreJean-Pierre Isbouts is a bestselling author and award-winning screenwriter and film director. A humanities scholar, his research has been devoted to biblical archaeology, Renaissance Florence and 19th century Europe. He also serves as graduate professor in the doctoral programs of Fielding Graduate University in Santa Barbara, CA.

Jean-Pierre was born in Eindhoven, Holland and studied Attic Greek and Latin before continuing in archaeology, art history and musicology at Leyden University. He completed his doctoral research on the 19th century architectural firm of Carrère & Hastings at Columbia University in New York. He then joined the American Council for the Arts (ACA) in New York City, active in a number of Federally funded arts programs. ​

In the 1990's, he founded the ArtSpace studio in Los Angeles, a unit of American Interactive Media, and produced a number of programs on Renaissance and 19th century art as part of the Great Art Series; many of these were subsequently translated in seven languages. He later served as Managing Director of Philips Interactive Media Europe, a joint venture with Polygram, from its head offices in London, UK.

As a musicologist, Dr. Isbouts has produced recordings of Bach, Corelli, Handel, Tchaikovsky, Satie, Franck and Debussy with the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, the Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra, and other soloists and ensembles.​

An award-winning filmmaker, Jean-Pierre has directed stars including Leonard Nimoy, Charlton Heston and Dick van Dyke, working with Hollywood studios such as Disney, Castle Rock Entertainment, Hallmark and Agamemnon Studios. His TV programs have been broadcast on ABC, A&E, CNBC, History Channel, Hallmark Channel and PBS stations, as well as scores of television networks in Europe and Asia.

His first book, Charlton Heston's Hollywood, was published in 1998. Based on many hours of interviews with Charlton Heston, the book chronicles the astonishing transformation of post-war American cinema through the eyes of the only actor whose career spanned from Cecil B. DeMille to James Cameron.

In 2007, National Geographic Books published his first major work, The Biblical World, which became a worldwide bestseller, and the first of several books for National Geographic Society. The success of Biblical World was followed by the 2012 publication of In the Footsteps of Jesus, which sold over a 100,000 copies in the first 8 weeks of release--an unprecedented record for a large hard-cover book at a $40 price point.

In 2013, Jean-Pierre wrote his in-depth study of Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa ("The Mona Lisa Myth"), written with Dr. Christopher Brown, and began a new work on the history of Christianity. In November of 2013, National Geographic Books will publish Jean-Pierre's Who's Who in the Bible, a major reference work comprising over 2,000 men and women in the Hebrew Scriptures and New Testament.

Jean-Pierre is represented by Global Lion Intellectual Property Management, a literary agency based in New York, Los Angeles and Florida .

​Jean-Pierre is graduate professor in several doctoral programs at Fielding Graduate University in Santa Barbara (www.fielding.edu). In his spare time (or what's left of it), he likes to discover new places in Asia and the Middle East with his wife Cathie, a production executive at Pantheon Studios.

Registration and more information: www.fielding.edu/Events 

Fielding Graduate University is an accredited nonprofit leader in blended graduate education, combining face‐to‐face and online learning. Our curriculum offers quality degrees and courses for professionals living and working around in the world. Fielding’s faculty members represent a breadth of scholarship and practice in the fields of educational leadership, human and organizational development, and clinical and media psychology. Maintaining Fielding’s reputation for quality programs for over forty years, faculty are mentors and guides to self‐directed students who use their skills to become powerful, and socially‐responsible leaders in their communities, workplaces, and society.

Tags: religion, conversation, fielding graduate university, human development

Fielding alumna Dr. Kathy Cowan Sahadath presented at the Academy of Management

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Tue, Aug 14, 2012

Image KCS resized 600On Saturday August 4, 2012 in Boston, Massachusetts at the Academy of Management Conference, Fielding Graduate University alumna Dr. Kathy Cowan Sahadath, school of HOD, presented a professional development workshop along with Dr. Dawn-Marie Turner and Dr. Lysbeth van Silfhout. The workshop was titled "Less Communication and More Conversation: Using Conversation to Facilitate Organizational Change." The workshop focused on conversation as the most natural and powerful ways of communicating during change with the goal of teaching how to use conversation as the primary means of communication for enabling intentional change.

The workshop focused on three areas:
1.         The role communication plays in affecting the outcome of an organizational change initiative. 
2.         The natural rhythm of conversation that occurs during change.
3.         The use of the guided conversation technique as a practical and effective tool for facilitating change in an organization change.

Click here for copy of a new e-zine Dr. Kathy Cowan Sahadath, Dr. Dawn-Marie Turner and Dr. Lysbeth van Silfhout produced through the International Council on Organizational Change-The Change Leader

Dr. Kathy Cowan Sahadath can be contacted at sahadath@rogers.com

Tags: organizational change, Organizational development, intentional change, conversation