Fielding Graduate University News

Policing Black and Brown Communities: Dynamics of Race, Class and Gender

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Wed, Jul 15, 2015

Policing Black and Brown Communities: A Discussion about Dynamics of Race, Class and Gender

SS15_Ed_Series_graphic-policeIn the current national conversation about police activity and brutality, especially in low income neighborhoods of people of color, we recognize that there are intersecting issues of racial classification, economic class, as well as gender and gender expression at work on our streets. Through a panel of local experts and activists on various aspects of this situation, along with Fielding Graduate University faculty, a discussion titled Policing Black and Brown Communities: Dynamics of Race, Class and Gender will focus on the debate over the right-wrong, police-citizen, for police-against police debates to a deeper analysis. Understanding the historical relationships between identified groups (eg. racially, economically, gender-based) and law enforcement in this country can help us more clearly identify paths of action to promote social justice for all peoples, rather than demonizing them based on categorical status.

As part of its National Summer Session in Rosemont, IL, Fielding Graduate University invites the extended Chicago community to this educational discussion tonight, Wednesday, July 15, 2015 from 7–9 pm at the Westin O’Hare in Rosemont, IL. This event is free and open to the public.

GUEST PANELISTS

Monique W. Morris, EdD

monique-1Morris is an author and social justice scholar with more than 20 years of professional and volunteer experience in the areas of education, civil rights, juvenile and social justice.  Dr. Morris is the author of Black Stats: African Americans by the Numbers in the Twenty-First Century (The New Press, 2014), Too Beautiful for Words (MWM Books, 2012); and Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools (The New Press, 2016), a forthcoming book on the criminalization of Black girls in schools. She has written dozens of articles, book chapters, and other publications on social justice issues and lectured widely on research, policies, and practices associated with improving juvenile justice, educational, and socioeconomic conditions for Black girls, women, and their families.

Morris is co-founder of The National Black Women’s Justice Institute; a lecturer for Saint Mary’s College of California and an adjunct professor for the University of San Francisco. She is a 2012 Soros Justice Fellow, the former vice president for Economic Programs, Advocacy and Research at the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and the former director of Research for the Thelton E. Henderson Center for Social Justice at the UC Berkeley Law School. Morris has also worked in partnership with and served as a consultant for state and county agencies, national academic and research institutions, and communities throughout the nation to develop comprehensive approaches and training curricula to eliminate racial/ethnic and gender disparities in the justice system. Her work in this area has informed the development and implementation of improved culturally competent and gender-responsive continua of services for youth.

Morris’ research intersects race, gender, education and justice to explore the ways in which Black communities, and other communities of color, are uniquely affected by social policies. Among other publications, Morris is the author of "Representing the Educational Experiences of Black Girls in a Juvenile Court School" (Journal of Applied Research on Children, 2014); "Sacred Inquiry and Delinquent Black Girls: Developing a Foundation for a Liberative Pedagogical Praxis" (In Understanding Work Experiences from Multiple Perspectives, edited by G.D. Sardana and Tojo Thatchenkery, 2014); Educating the Caged Bird: Black Girls and the Juvenile Court School (Poverty & Race, PRRAC, 2013) and Race, Gender and the School to Prison Pipeline: Expanding Our Discussion to Include Black Girls (African American Policy Forum, 2012). Her 2008 study, A Higher Hurdle: Barriers to Employment for Formerly Incarcerated Women (UC Berkeley School of Law), which is one of the first testing studies to examine the impact of a criminal record or period of incarceration on the employment outcomes of women, was referenced in a special report commissioned by Congressman Danny K. Davis (D-IL).

Morris is a member of the OJJDP National Girls Institute Expert Panel and the California Board of State and Community Corrections’ Committee on Reducing Racial and Ethnic Disparity. She is also an advisory board member for Global Girl Media, Oakland and regular contributor to Ebony.com.

Chairty Tolliver

Tolliver is the Founder and Project Director of Black on Both Sides. A seasoned and nationally recognized youth development specialist, Tolliver grew up in the Englewood neighborhood of Chicago. She is a foster mother, writer, and spoken word artist, and former director of one of the largest and oldest organizing groups in Chicago, Southwest Youth Collaborative. In over thirteen years in the field of Youth Development, she has worked on campaigns on a broad range of issues, including fair housing, labor rights, school reform, prison reform, and LGBT youth rights. In 2012 she was selected as one of seven activists nationwide to receive the Alston Bannerman Fellowship, and is a 2013 George Soros Senior Justice Fellow. Charity identifies as a Black woman and mother, and uses feminine pronouns. She is not youth-identified, although the UN Declaration on the Rights of Youth might disagree.

Chacyln Hunt

Hunt is an attorney and police misconduct organizer in Chicago and works with youth of color and their experiences with police. Her project integrates civil rights education with research and legal strategy driven by the kids' everyday experiences with law enforcement. The students she works with participate in role plays and produce interviews with their classmates. We (a group of professionals) spend months with the kids learning from them, and helping them gain a critical distance from their experiences in order to advocate for police accountability.             

For more information about this and other Fielding Educational Series sessions, please visit fielding.edu/events.

Tags: gender empowerment, EdD, Education Doctorate, diversity, organizational change, conversation, leadership, adult learning, national session, fielding graduate university, human rights, criminal justice

President of The Chicago School of Professional Psychology (TCSPP) Patricia Arredondo, EdD, to Discuss Latina Feminism

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Tue, Jul 14, 2015

Patricia Arredondo, EdD, to Discuss Latina Feminism at the Fielding Educational Series in Rosemont, IL

Latinas in the U.S. are in the process of claiming their power through higher education while navigating cultural divides in personal and professional relationships and in other social contexts.

SS15_Ed_Series_graphic-heart_ArredondoOn Wednesday, July 15, 2015 from 4–6 pm at the Westin O’Hare in Rosemont, IL, the Chicago Campus President of The Chicago School of Professional Psychology (TCSPP) Patricia Arredondo, EdD will discuss how Latina feminism influences peoples relationship-oriented cultural worldview and sense of fairness and social justice. As part of its National Summer Session in Rosemont, IL, Fielding Graduate University invites the extended Chicago community to join this educational presentation sponsored by Fielding’s Worldwide Network for Gender Empowerment, titled Leading from the Heart and Cultural Roots. This event is free and open to the public.                                                                                  

Latina feminism is influenced by our relationship-oriented cultural worldview and sense of fairness and social justice. This feminist framework is rooted in historic events that place a value on education, community engagement, and compassion. Latinas in the U.S. are in the process of claiming their power through higher education while navigating cultural divides in personal and professional relationships and in other social contexts. Dr. Arredondo will present concepts and models, often invisible to Latinas themselves that contribute to our sense of identity and empowerment.

About Patricia Arredondo, EdD

Arredondo_Commencement_PhotoPatricia Arredondo, EdD, became Chicago Campus President of The Chicago School of Professional Psychology (TCSPP) in February 2013. She joined the school after successfully serving in senior administrative roles with the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and Arizona State University. Additionally, she led an organizational consulting firm addressing diversity in the workplace in Boston for 13 years. As of June 2015, she has assumed a new position with TCSPP as Senior Advisor for Institutional Initiatives.

In the academic world, Arredondo is a national leader and scholar on many fronts, extensively published in the areas of multicultural competency development, immigrant issues in counseling, counseling with Latinas/os, women’s leadership and, organizational diversity. She has authored more than 100 referred journal articles, book chapters, and training videos and is regularly invited for keynote addresses nationally and internationally. Her latest book, Culturally Responsive Counseling for Latinas/os was published in 2014 by the American Counseling Association (ACA) Press. Currently, Arredondo is also co-principal Investigator on a three-year training grant from the National Science Foundation that advances women of color in the STEM fields to administrative opportunities at Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Tribal Colleges. She considers herself a social justice advocate and an educator at heart.

Civic and professional organization leadership is visible throughout Arredondo’s career. She served as president of four national associations, among these was the American Counseling Association (ACA), the largest counseling association in the world. She is the only Latina to serve in that position. Arredondo was also president of the American Psychological Association Division 45 - Society for the Psychological Study of Ethnic Minority Issues, the Association of Multicultural Counseling and Development of the ACA and the founding president of the National Latina/o Psychological. In the civic arena, Arredondo has always been active in community activities. Among her leadership roles were president of the Board of Family and Children’s Services in Boston, on the board of the Diversity Leadership Committee for the City of Phoenix, Vice-Chair of the Social Development Commission for Milwaukee County, the largest anti-poverty organization in Wisconsin, and more recently she was appointed to the Advisory Board for DiversityMBA Magazine in Chicago. She chairs the Board of Professional Affairs for the American Psychological Association.

Arredondo has been the recipient of many awards and recognitions throughout her career. Many of these awards acknowledge her as a “pioneer” or change agent in her profession. She is the 2013 recipient of the prestigious Henry Tomes Award for Distinguished Lifetime Contributions to the Advancement of Ethnic Minority Psychology, the “Living Legend” award from the ACA, the Lifetime Achievement Award from APA Division 45, the Madrina Award by the National Latina/o Psychological Association, and an honorary degree from the University of San Diego; she also holds Fellow status with the American Counseling and American Psychological Associations. She enjoys promoting women’s leadership, mentoring graduate students, emerging professionals, entrepreneurs, and individuals who want to make a difference on behalf of others.

Arredondo holds degrees from Kent State University, Boston College, and Boston University. She is a licensed psychologist and bilingual in English and Spanish. Arredondo is extremely proud of her Mexican American heritage. Arredondo is family-centered and enjoys her extended family engagements across the country.

 For more information about all of the Fielding Educational Series please visit https://www.eventbrite.com/e/fielding-educational-series-summer-2015-registration-17487812518.

Tags: EdD, social justice, educational leadership, diversity, sociology, leadership, adult learning, fielding graduate university, human rights, learning

James A. Banks to Receive The Fielding Social Justice Award

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Thu, May 08, 2014

FGU Seal web resized 600The Social Justice Award was established in 1986 by psychology alumna Lynn Friedman Kessler to recognize demonstrated concern for and commitment to the furtherance of social justice.

At Fielding Graduate University, social justice is the commitment to understanding, analyzing, and acting to reduce inequity, oppression and social stratification, recognizing the linkages between economics, social and ecological justice.

The hope is that the action for which the award is conferred will provide exemplary models of commitment to social justice for Fielding Graduate University and its members. The award is granted through the Office of the President and ia demonstrative of one of our core values, reducing the many forms of inequality.

The Fielding Graduate University Social Justice Award is given each year, one award to a Fielding student and/or alumni, and another will be made to a Fielding faculty and/or staff member. 

This evening, Thursday, May 8, 2014, at the University Club in San Francisco, CA, President Katrina Rogers is awarding the Fielding Graduate University Social Justice Award to James A. Banks in recognition for his exemplary commitment to social justice work through his extensive work in multicultural education.

James A. BanksBanks holds the Kerry and Linda Killinger Endowed Chair in Diversity Studies and is the founding director of the Center for Multicultural Education at the University of Washington, Seattle. He was the Russell F. Stark University Professor at the University of Washington from 2001 to 2006. Banks is a past president of the American Educational Research Association and of the National Council for the Social Studies.

He is a specialist in social studies education and multicultural education and has written widely in these fields. His books include Teaching Strategies for Ethnic Studies; Cultural Diversity and Education: Foundations, Curriculum, and Teaching; Educating Citizens in a Multicultural Society; and Race, Culture, and Education: The Selected Works of James A. Banks. Banks is the editor of the Handbook of Research on Multicultural Education; The Routledge International Companion to Multicultural Education; Diversity and Citizenship Education: Global Perspectives; and the Encyclopedia of Diversity in Education, published in 2012 by Sage in both hard and electronic editions.

banks quote

Banks is also the editor of the Multicultural Education Series of books published by Teachers College Press, Columbia University. There are now 52 published books in this Series; others are in development. Banks is a member of the National Academy of Education and a Fellow of the American Educational Research Association.

During the 2005-2006 academic year, Banks was a Spencer Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford. In 2007 he was the Tisch Distinguished Visiting Professor at Teachers College, Columbia University. He was a Visiting Distinguished Professor at the University of Hong Kong in 2010, a Visiting Professor at the Minzu University of China in 2011 (in Beijing), and a Visiting Professor at Northwest Normal University in Lanzhou, China in 2012.

He holds honorary doctorates from the Bank Street College of Education (New York), the University of Alaska Fairbanks, the University of Wisconsin–Parkside, DePaul University, Lewis and Clark College, and Grinnell College and is a recipient of the UCLA Medal, the university’s highest honor. In 2005, Banks delivered the 29th Annual Faculty Lecture at the University of Washington, the highest honor given to a professor at the University. 

Research by Banks on how educational institutions can improve race and ethnic relations has greatly influenced schools, colleges, and universities throughout the United States and the world. Banks has given lectures on citizenship education and diversity in many different nations, including Australia, Canada, China, Cyprus, England, Ethiopia, France, Germany, Greece, Hong Kong, Ireland, Israel, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Norway, Russia, Scotland, Singapore, Sweden, and New Zealand. His books have been translated into Greek, Japanese, Chinese, Korean, and Turkish.

Past recipients include:

  • Paolo Friere
  • Jan Hively
  • Valerie Bentz
  • Jodie Morrow
  • Peter Park
  • Jodie Veroff
  • Argentine Craig
  • Leonard Baca
  • Cathy Royal
  • Christine Ho
  • Pat Kilby-Robb
  • Isidro Ruby
  • Susan Cortez
  • Judy Colemans
  • Susan Ferrant
  • Susan Taira

For more information about social justice work at Fielding: http://www.fielding.edu/whyFielding/social-justice

 

 

Tags: social justice, educational leadership, diversity, multicultural, fielding graduate university

Fielding Graduate University at The Justice Conference in LA

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Fri, Mar 07, 2014

Fielding Has a Visible Presence at The Justice Conference

Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Reported by Monique L. Snowden, PhD, vice president for academic services at Fielding Graduate University

Fielding recently returned to the Orpheum Theatre in Los Angeles, CA where we sponsored the International Positive Aging Conference in 2010, 2011, and 2013. This time, however, we were at the fourth annual Justice Conference promoting Fielding student, faculty and alumni’s justice work and recruiting prospective students for our academic programs.

The conference included a lineup of plenary speakers, musical and spoken word artists, and discussion panelists. Nearly 2,000 conference attendees, sponsors and exhibitors packed the theater for each scheduled speaker, artist and panelist. In between talks and performances, the main lobby, mezzanine lobby, stairways and exhibitor areas were buzzing with rich dialogue about the “work” represented and inspired by those on agenda and attending the Justice Conference.Justice Conference

Many conference attendees, plenary speakers, panelists, artists and exhibitors came into and do justice work for reasons not shared by all and are grounded by doctrines not held by all. Differences in personal motivations or beliefs notwithstanding, those whom the Fielding delegation engaged in conversation shared our university’s vision to create a more humane, just and sustainable world. By way of our institutional values and demonstrable justice work we attracted interest in both our academic offerings and partnership opportunities with organizations in attendance like Memphis Teacher Residency (MTR). MTR proclaims that “Urban Education is the Greatest Social Justice and Civil Rights Issue in America Today.”

Bryan A. Stevenson, founder and executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative, an Alabama-based group delivered a powerful message. Mr. Stevenson and his EJI colleagues have won major legal challenges eliminating excessive and unfair sentencing, exonerating innocent prisoners on death row, confronting abuse of the incarcerated and the mentally-ill, and aiding children prosecuted as adults. 

Conference attendees were consistently reminded that justice work is intensive and extensive. As one conference speaker advised, to do our best justice work, we must manage our egos, exhaustion and emotional toxicity. We must remain humble in our work, take time to rejuvenate our spirits and re-energize our bodies, and balance our passion with necessary discipline and focus. We must keep top of mind that the difficult and never-ending fight for justice is not one that merely involves lifting up and comforting those who need resources and services.

Justice work requires us to stand with the poor, fight beside the condemned, and dwell amongst the vulnerable. We must see and hold ourselves accountable as one people who are global citizens of interrelated communities, states, countries, and continents. Slain humanitarian and civil rights activist Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. left us with a timeless justice credo, “We are bound by an inescapable garment of mutuality, whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly.

For more information about The Justice Conference, click here: http://thejusticeconference.com/

Tags: social justice, diversity, fielding graduate university, human rights

Addressing Dilemmas of Multiculturalism with TEK

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Tue, Jul 16, 2013
Four Arrows

Fielding Graduate University is pleased to feature a free and open to the public educational seminar titled Addressing Dilemmas of Multiculturalism with Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) with Four Arrows (Don Trent Jacobs) as a part of the Fielding Educational Series Thursday, July 18thfrom 7:30pm – 9:00 pm  at the at the Hilton Alexandria Mark Center, 500 Seminary Road, Alexandria, VA 22331.

The Fielding Educational Series features select presentations that are timely and relevant to current social issues from the scholarly fields of human and organizational development, psychology, and educational leadership and change.

This thought-provoking presentation and interactive dialogue will consider seven dualities that often occur with how multiculturalism exists in Western societies from an Indigenous perspective. Four Arrows shows how Indigenous wisdom that has focused on good relationships with all animate and inanimate beings offers a holistic and balancing approach to authentic multicultural goals, especially as they relate to:
  • Cultural ignorance vs. cultural wisdom
  • Distrust vs. trust
  • Cultural hegemony vs. public good
  • Self-identity prejudice vs. diversity strength
  • Recognition demands vs. equity demands
  • Religion vs. spirituality
  • Rhetoric vs. reality
Four Arrows, aka Don Trent Jacobs, former dean of education at Oglala Lakota College and tenured associate professor at Northern Arizona University, is faculty in the School of Educational Leadership and Change at Fielding Graduate University. Selected by AERO as one of 27 visionaries in education for the text, Turning Points, and recipient of the 2012 Mid-Day Star Award for his work with Canadian Aboriginals and the 2004 Moral Courage Award for his activism by the Martin Springer Institute for Holocaust Studies, he has published numerous books, chapters and articles on critical/ anarchist education and wellness as viewed through the lens of Indigenous Wisdom. His work has been praised by such notable thinkers as Vine Deloria Jr., Noam Chomsky, Parker Palmer, Sunita Gandhi, Rachael Kessler, Chet Bowers and Henry Giroux. His most recent book, Teaching Truly: A Curriculum to Indigenize Mainstream Education, was released by Peter Lang in April 2013.

 For more information and to RSVP: http://fieldingeducationalseriessummer2013.eventbrite.com/

#FieldingSS13

Tags: educational leadership, diversity, fielding graduate university

Teaching Truly: A Curriculum to Indigenize Mainstream Education

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Mon, May 13, 2013
Teaching Truly resized 600

Fielding Graduate University School of Educational Leadership and Change (ELC) faculty member, Four Arrows (Don Trent Jacobs) publishes book entitled, Teaching Truly: A Curriculum to Indigenize Mainstream Education.

This is the twenty-first book written by Four Arrows, and Peter Lang Publishers claims Teaching Truly to be a first of its kind for educational publishing. After reviewing Teaching Truly, Noam Chomsky stated:

This enlightening book reminds us that the grim prognosis for life on this planet is the consequence of a few centuries of forgetting what traditional societies knew, and the surviving ones still recognize. We must nurture and preserve our common possession, the traditional commons, for future generations, and this must be one of our highest values, or we are all doomed. To regain this sensibility from those who have preserved it we must pay careful attention to their understanding and practices, especially their educational practices as brought to us in these thoughtful chapters.

Teaching Truly offers K-16 course-specific guidelines for helping teachers and students counter-balance mainstream education’s hegemonic influences with indigenous learning precepts. Guest authors contribute to six of the book’s thirteen chapters, one of which is doctoral ELC student and mentee of Four Arrows, Kathryn England-Aytes.

This is not the first Fielding student to have co-authored with Four Arrows. A number of students in Fielding’s neuropsychology program contributed to his book, Critical Neurophilosophy and Indigenous Wisdom and students from all three colleges contributed to his acclaimed text on alternative dissertations, The Authentic Dissertation. When asked about why he asked a student to contribute, Four Arrows replied:

I’m fortunate to be able at this stage of my career to get publishers interested in projects. One of my goals, besides getting people to rethink status-quo perspectives, is to give recognition to the one school that stands for challenging the stats-quo where needed, Fielding Graduate University. Since our students are a big reason for Fielding’s reputation, I love to not only use their expertise but also to give them first opportunities to get published whenever possible. Kathryn’s dissertation work offered a perfect opportunity for an introductory chapter for this book and I’m proud she has joined the more seasoned guest authors on the cover of the book.

As an anarchist educator, Four Arrows solicited a large number of noted critical educators to read and comment on his text. Although he admits that offering suggestions for non-Indian teachers to teach non-Indian students is sensitive and complex undertaking, it is full of opportunities to turn the dire situations facing our world around. It seems that many agree with this approach.

The sampling of reviews below reveals that Four Arrows has touched a nerve in both offering frank criticism of policy, standards and outcomes in mainstream education while offering a counter-balancing solution that can be used in complementary ways to existing curriculum for those teachers who dare:

Penetrating, fearless and practical, this book offers educators (and anyone else with an interest in our future) a way to create a better world—before it is too late!—Thom Hartmann

In my own work as an environmental activist, I’ve learned more from the indigenous environmental network than just about anyone else. If the Indigenous perspective can help even an old guy like me, then educators should be paying attention to what Four Arrows offers in this book. God knows we need some new ways of looking at things.—Bill McKibben

Teaching Truly is a singularly provocative book with the unsettling analysis that education is not about learning and economics is not about the well-being of society. As today’s institutions crumble in their dysfunction, Four Arrows draws upon tens of thousands of years of empirical data within Indigenous societies, crucial intelligence on what works and how to unleash the kind of learning that will help us become human beings present and in balance with Mother Earth.—Rebecca Adamson

At a time when mainstream education is viewed as impoverished and lacking in meaning, this engaging book invites educators to start a self-reflective dialogue on educational innovation stimulated and inspired by the indigenous wisdom. With humility, sensitivity and force, Teaching Truly gives rise to the possibility of transforming education from inside out.—Scherto Gill

In this provocative new book, Four Arrows takes a principled stand on behalf of a significant educational perspective that has long been buried by corporate and political interests, that of the continent’s primary people. We would surely live more balanced, respectful and grounded lives if 21st-century educators were to read this book and learn from its lessons. If we hope to pass along to our grandchildren a healthy 22nd century, we need a richer education than the ‘edupreneurs’ have provided us thus far.—Peter Smagorinsky

This new book by Four Arrows bridges a gap, allowing for a renewed flow of wisdom from American Indian cultures. This perspective has always been crucial to us at AERO and we hope many will be able to use it before our mainstream culture goes over a cliff.”—Jerry Mintz

This book needs to be taken seriously. It offers a perspective that has been missing in cultural storage and thinking promoted in public schools and universities and online learning systems. There are many reasons for learning from indigenous knowledge systems. It would be a mistake to read Teaching Truly as an appeal to going back in time, as the lessons to be learned from indigenous cultures are timeless.—C.A. Bowers

In Teaching Truly, Four Arrows draws a frighteningly accurate map of the known world, and the spiritual and material collapse that’s upon us: death and destruction at the heart of the liberal techno/imperial/capitalist juggernaut. Drawing on ancient and Indigenous ways of being and knowing Four Arrows offers a contemporary guide to what is to be done, and illuminates a path toward a future where schools might play a powerful role in truth-seeking, repair, and renewal for all children, youth, families, and teachers. After an encounter with Four Arrows, I reflected with renewed energy on the urgent questions that drive free people in pursuit of enlightenment and liberation: What are we? Why are we here? Where are we headed? How shall we live? What kind of world can we hope to inhabit? This handbook for teachers is a vibrant and essential text for anyone who wants to understand the broad dimensions of the mess we’re in and pursue a wise and practical pathway forward.—William Ayers

Four Arrows has cut to the core in Teaching Truly. Doing more than overcoming the omissions, misinterpretations, and outright fictionalization of our culture, traditions and spirituality that have been taught in American schools, he has put together generalizable teachings for specific subjects in ways that can point education toward achieving a more balanced world.—Tim Giago, Nanwica Kciji (Stands Up for Them)

To order a copy of Teaching Truly: A Curriculum to Indigenize Mainstream Education go to Amazon.com. All profits from this book will go to worthy American Indian educational associations and foundations.

Listen to Four Arrows radio interview on the Kevin Barret show: http://truthjihadradio.blogspot.mx/

Contact: Four Arrows, aka Don Trent Jacobs, PhD, EdD, http://www.teachingvirtues.net

 

Tags: educational leadership, diversity, multicultural, fielding graduate university, learning

Preparations are set for the Sixth Annual International Conference on Positive Aging in Los Angeles, CA in February 2013

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Thu, Nov 29, 2012

PACCommunity members and renowned experts gather to shape confident future for aging population.

Featuring keynote speaker Wendy Lustbader, MSW, live webinar with Ram Dass, award recognition for Dr. James E. Birren,and presentation from Dr. Brian de Vries amongst many others.


According to the U.S. Census Bureau and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, baby boomers will turn 65 at a rate of 10,000 per day for the next decade making them the fastest growing segment of the population. Future implications indicate: “tomorrow’s elderly will have quite different social, demographic, health, and economic characteristics than today’s elderly… as average length of life continues to increase, issues regarding the quality of active life expectancy are likely to assume greater importance.” In anticipation of this growing segment of our population, the Sixth Annual International Conference on Positive Aging, hosted by Fielding Graduate University’s Institute for Social Innovation, brings together notable speakers and workshop leaders to explore new and innovative approaches to positive aging. This year’s topic is “Life-Reimagined: New Approaches to Positive Aging” and the conference will take place February 10-12, 2013 at the Center for Healthy Communities at The California Endowment in Los Angeles.

The Sixth Annual International Conference on Positive Aging includes a variety of workshops that explore themes of creative expression, community, wellness, and life transitions.  Dr. Katrina Rogers, Provost of Fielding Graduate University and Senior Vice-President states:  “Positive aging promotes creativity, wellness, and growth. It means taking personal control of your life instead of being a victim or passive observer. In this model, aging presents a new opportunity for being socially active, for engaging with the community, for being productive, and for seeking a new meaning and purpose in life. This is why the conference is larger each year: people are interested about how to age well.” The conference provides opportunities to engage in physical and creative activities, including yoga, meditation, music, and connecting with others with similar interests.  Conference registration is open to the public.

Wendy Lustbader resized 600The keynote speaker for this year’s conference is Wendy Lustbader, MSW, who currently serves as Affiliate Associate Professor at the University of Washington School of Social Work. Ms. Lustbader has considerable experience working with older people, their families and caregivers, and lectures nationally on subjects related to aging.  As a medical social worker, she specialized for almost twenty years in out-patient mental health at the Pike Market Medical Clinic in Seattle, and has also practiced in a home health care agency, hospital geriatric unit, and nursing home. Ms. Lustbader’s first book was co-authored with Nancy Hooyman, Taking Care of Aging Family Members. This is a practical guide to caregiving which is still considered the best book of its kind by experts in the field of aging. At the opening reception on Sunday, February 10th, Ms. Lustbader will speak about her latest book, Life Gets Better: The Unexpected Pleasures of Growing Older.

 

Ram Dass resized 600The conference will also host a webinar with world-renowned American contemporary spiritual teacher and author Ram Dass. He is known for his personal and professional associations with Timothy Leary at Harvard University in the early 1960's, for his travels to India and his relationship with the Hindu guru Neem Karoli Baba, and for founding the charitable organizations Seva Foundation and Hanuman Foundation. His practice of karma yoga or spiritual service has opened up millions to their deep, yet individuated spiritual practice and path. Dass continues to uphold the boddhisatva ideal for others through his compassionate sharing of true knowledge and vision. His unique skill in getting people to cut through and feel divine love without dogma is still a positive influence on people all over the world.

 

BirrenPic resized 600Dr. James E. Birren is one of the "reigning pioneers" in the organized field of gerontology since the 1940s. He is a past president of The Gerontological Society of America, and author of over 250 publications. Dr. Birren will receive Fielding's Creative Longevity and Wisdom Award in recognition of his six decades of seminal contributions including the influential work on guided autobiography.

 

 

 

 

Brian de Vries resized 600Featured speaker Dr. Brian de Vries, Professor of Gerontology at San Francisco State University, and will share his extensive work on aging experiences, including bereavement among gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender adults.  He is a Fellow of the Gerontological Society of American, a member of the Leadership Council for the American Society on Aging, and co-chair of the Lesbian and Gay Aging Issues Network constituency group. Most recently, Dr. de Vries has become a policy advisor for AARP, California. 

 

 

 

Attendees include professionals in the fields of health care, insurance, life planning, care giving and lifelong learning, as well as those interested in ageism, gaining, spirituality, creativity, wellness, entrepreneurship and more.

Early registration for the three day conference is $275 until January 14th, 2013, and $300 after. Single day tickets are $125. Registration includes meals and opening reception Sunday evening.  To attend only the Sunday dinner reception featuring keynote speaker Wendy Lustbader is $80.

To register, please visit: http://positiveaging2013.eventbrite.com/#

For more information and updates about the conference, please visit the website: http://www.positiveaging.fielding.edu/

Join the Facebook page for speaker updates and event announcements: Positive Aging Conference FACEBOOK 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tags: creativity, social justice, educational leadership, diversity, religion, intentional change, conference, sociology, self-esteem, international, adult learning, higher education, fielding graduate university, human development, learning

Warren Lambert recently named President of the KALGBTIC

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Wed, Nov 07, 2012

Warren LambertFielding alumnus Warren Lambert (PSY '11) was recently named president of the KALGBTIC (Kentucky Association for Lesbian Gay Bisexual & Transgender Issues In Counseling) Division of the Kentucky Counseling Association. 

KALGBTIC is a division of the Kentucky Counseling Association and works in partnership with the national division of the Association of Lesbian, Bisexual & Transgender Issue in Counseling (ALGBTIC). The mission of ALGBTIC includes the recognition of both individual and social contexts representing the confluence of race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation, ability, age, spiritual or religious belief system, indigenous heritage in order: to promote greater awareness and understanding of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (GLBT) issues among members of the counseling profession and related helping occupations, to improve standards and delivery of counseling services provided to GLBT clients and communities, to identify conditions which create barriers to the human growth and development of GLBT clients and communities and use counseling skills, programs, and efforts to preserve, protect, and promote such development, to develop, implement, and foster interest in counseling-related charitable, scientific, and educational programs designed to further the human growth and development of GLBT clients and communities, to secure equality of treatment, advancement, qualifications, and status of GLBT members of the counseling profession and related helping occupations, and to publish a journal and other scientific, educational, and professional materials with the purpose of raising the standards of practice for all who work with GLBT clients and communities in the counseling profession and related helping occupations.

 

 

Tags: diversity, psychology

The Promise of Educational Opportunity

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Wed, Oct 17, 2012

Fielding Graduate University presents

"The Promise of Educational Opportunity" featuring Laurie OlsenLaurie Olsen, PhD, author of Reparable Harm: Fulfilling the Unkept Promise of Educational Opportunity

Saturday, October 20, 2012 in Riverside, California

Dr. Laurie Olsen will address the topic of equal education in our schools. Immigration reform expert Sofia Campos will discuss the implications of deferred action for California students and educators. 

About the Author

Laurie Olsen, PhD, has worked with hundreds of teams of district and school leadership and county offices of education across California to design and implement powerful English Learner programs and services and to support effective school change strategies. Her career spans four decades as a researcher, writer, and provider of leadership development and technical assistance on educational equity for immigrant students, language minority students, and English Learners. She currently directs the SEAL Initiative, a preschool-third grade demonstration project for Spanish- speaking English Learners in Silicon Valley. She served as chief consultant to The PROMISE Initiative (a six-county, six-district collaborative focused on transformative education for English Learners in southern California), and was for many years the Executive Director of California Tomorrow. Dr. Olsen has published dozens of books, videos, and articles on English Learner education, including the award winning Made in America: Immigrants in U.S. Schools. She holds a Ph.D. in Social and Cultural Studies in Education from U.C. Berkeley and serves on the Executive Board of Californians Together.

Dr. Teresa Marquez-Lopez, Dr. Teresa Marquez-Lopez, associate dean and program director for master’s and continuing education in the School of Educational Leadership & Change, will recognize Fielding alumni for their work in San Bernardino schools.

Fielding alumni, students, faculty, and staff will be available to share information about the university’s program offerings.

DATE: Saturday, October 20, 2012

TIME: 9:00 am to 12:00 pm

LOCATION: Mission Inn Hotel and Spa, 3649 Mission Avenue, Riverside, California 92501

REGISTER: http://fguolsen.eventbrite.com  

You are invited to join us! Space is limited. Please register today.

SPONSORS:

California Association for Bilingual Education (CABE) 

Inland Empire Scholarship Fund

Norton Space and Aeronautics Academy

Riverside Chapter of CABE

Schools First Federal Credit Union

Southern California Edison

Tags: educational leadership, diversity, higher education, graduate education

School of HOD faculty member, Dr. Placida Gallegos, plays crucial role in implementing project to boost Latino/Latina student success in New Mexico

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Tue, Oct 09, 2012

Picture of  Placida Velasquez GallegosFielding Graduate University faculty Placida Gallegos, PhD, in the Human & Organizational Development (HOD) program, was an integal part of the core-planning team and a coach in the latino/latina student success project for the state of New Mexico, which was among similar projects across the country for which the Lumina Foundation provided significant funding.

The Lumina Foundation required all participating sites to undergo a rigorous reflection and planning period during the first year. The process was designed to ensuring the strategy generated by each city was sustainable and would result in the collective impact of closing the achievement gap for latino/latina students in higher education.  

The Lumnia Foundation announced the following in a press release October 3rd, 2012:

Lumina is pleased to acknowledge the great work and leadership of local champions all across the country. Over the past six months, Lumina has provided technical assistance and support to these 13 communities as they have refined and developed Latino student success projects. The cohort is now ready for implementation, and the projects proposed seek to increase the educational attainment for more than 200,000 students touched by this effort over the next four years. This investment in Latino student success is designed to strengthen local collaborative ventures that promise to improve the postsecondary attainment of Latino students.

Through this grant investment, Lumina is providing a total of $11.5 million over a four year period to 13 different partnerships. The partnerships will leverage community leaders across key policy, education, business and nonprofit sectors to build, implement and sustain college preparation, access and success strategies for Latino students.

“Lumina’s Latino Student Success effort is grounded in two concepts: a commitment to Latino student success for reasons of equity, economic stability and national competitiveness, and the power of local partnerships as framed by the Collective Impact Model,” said Lumina Foundation President and CEO Jamie Merisotis. “This effort is an integral part of our commitment to Goal 2025.”

At more than 50 million, by 2025, half of the nation’s workers will be of Latino descent. At that time, 63 percent of all jobs in the United States will require some form of postsecondary education or training, according to labor economist Anthony Carnevale of the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce.

“Lumina’s Latino Student Success effort enables us to focus on a task that is at once a serious challenge and a priceless opportunity: increasing college attainment for more Latino students,” said Sarita Brown, president of Excelencia in Education. “This effort will not only enhance the lives of Latino students but will help to ensure a bright future for all Americans.”

The success of this effort is a key driver on the road to reach all national college attainment goals. (http://www.luminafoundation.org/newsroom/news_releases/2012-10-03.html)

 

Tags: educational leadership, diversity, multicultural