Fielding Graduate University News

Alumna Monique Morris Scores Gloria Steinem Shout-Out for New Book

Posted by Starshine Roshell on Fri, Mar 25, 2016

Pushout_Cover.jpg

When Gloria Steinem tells you to read something, you should probably read it.

If you ever doubted that Supremacy Crimes—those devoted to maintaining hierarchy—are rooted in both sex and race, read Pushout,” the feminist icon is quoted as saying on the back cover of Fielding alumna Monique Morris’ new book.”Monique Morris tells us exactly how schools are crushing the spirit and talent that this country needs.”

PUSHOUT exposes the ways that young Black schoolgirls are marginalized, criminalized and ultimately—unnecessarily—pushed out of schools and into unhealthy, unstable and often unsafe futures.

It’s a topic that’s been close to Morris’ heart for decades. She explored the subject in her 2001 novel Too Beautiful for Words, and again in her Fielding dissertation, “Conceptualizing a Quality, Culturally Competent and Gender Responsive Education for Northern California Black Girls in Confinement.”

Morris graduated in 2013 with an EdD and says that her doctoral research at Fielding “absolutely informed and contributed to elements” of PUSHOUT, which publishes March 29. We caught up with her for a quick Q&A just before she headed out on a book tour.

Q. What brought you to Fielding originally?
A. I was very much attracted to the community of scholars who were committed to social justice in education. I was also impressed by the caliber and diverse interests of the faculty--in fact I was referred to the program by a former faculty member that I admire and respect greatly. The flexibility of the program was also important to me, given my many professional commitments.

Q. What were some of the things you learned at Fielding that were useful to you during the creating of PUSHOUT
A. My policy work with Dr. Lenneal Henderson and systems thinking work with Dr. Kathy Tiner were particularly helpful to my thinking about educational policy, as were the focused research projects that I completed with Dr. Kitty Kelly Epstein. Skills that I learned in these courses and knowledge areas are certainly reflected in PUSHOUT and in my ongoing work to advance educational equity for marginalized girls. 

I also have to say that these three are among the finest scholars I've encountered in my academic/ professional career and I feel extraordinarily honored to have had the opportunity to work with them.

Q. What do you hope will come out of this book? What will it accomplish in the world, if you had your way?

A. I’m hopeful that this book will launch a series of conversations and strategy sessions to combat the manifestation of racialized gender oppression in schools (and communities) and to uplift the promise of Black girls as young scholars, critical thinkers, and school leaders.

MoniqueMorris.jpg

Monique Morris

Q. What’s next for you?
A. Immediately, I plan to visit cities in the U.S. and center PUSHOUT in the critical discussions that I hope will foster policy and practice improvements, as well as shift the consciousness facilitating the criminalization of our children.

Following the tour, I will continue to grow the National Black Women's Justice Institute, an organization that I co-founded a few years ago. Our projects are designed to: 1) interrupt school to confinement pathways, 2) improve the employment outcomes for formerly incarcerated women, and 3) provide technical assistance to organizations working to end violence against women in African-American communities nationwide. I'm focused on remedies—so I expect to be in this work for a while.

Q. Any other writing projects in the works?
A. I may extend the epistemology and challenge myself to a graphic novel. Wouldn't that be cool?

We think it would, indeed. Good luck, Dr. Morris!

Tags: EdD

Fielding Graduate University’s Worldwide Network For Gender Empowerment Granted Consultative Status To The United Nations

Posted by Hilary Molina on Sat, Oct 17, 2015

The Worldwide Network for Gender Empowerment (WNGE), a center within Fielding Graduate University, announced today that it was granted special consultative status to the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC).

Acting Chief for the Office of ECOSOC Support and Coordination Alberto Padova wrote, “I am pleased to inform you that the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) at its coordination and management meeting adopted the recommendation of the Committee on Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) to grant special consultative status to your organization. On behalf of all staff of the Non-Governmental Organizations Branch/OESC/DESA, please accept our heartfelt congratulations.”

WNGE, a global organization focused on scholar-activism impacting women’s and gender issues, has been a recognized and registered nongovernmental (NGO) with the United Nations Department of Public Information (DPI) since 2009. This special consultative status elevates WNGE into an elite circle of NGOs working directly with the functional commissions.

ECOSOC status for an organization enables it to actively engage with the United Nations Secretariat, programs, funds and agencies. These activities include:

  • Placement of items of special interest in the provisional agenda of the Council
  • Attendance at meetings and access to the United Nations offices in New York, Geneva and Vienna
  • Submission and circulation of written statements
  • Oral presentations at ECOSOC
  • Consultations with ECOSOC and its subsidiary bodies

“We are extremely pleased to have been granted special consultative status to the UN,” stated Director for WNGE Anna DiStefano, EdD. “This provides us the opportunity to more fully engage in our global advocacy and policy work focused on gender empowerment and equity.”

Fielding Graduate University President Katrina Rogers added, “We are very proud of the accomplishments of WNGE and the recognition the organization has received on the global stage. WNGE is a great example of Fielding’s focus on scholar-activism, social justice and leadership.”

Worldwide Network for Gender Empowerment (WNGE) is an engaged and diverse ecosystem comprised of global members committed to research, collaboration, and action in support of women’s and gender issues. WNGE is focused on impacting change with cross-cutting measures in sectors including education, health care, environment, violence prevention, equality, and globalization.

 

 

Tags: globalization, EdD, women's issues, leadership, fielding graduate university, human rights, katrina rogers

Steven A. Schapiro, EdD, Named Interim Dean

Posted by Hilary Molina on Fri, Aug 07, 2015

Steve_Schapiro5479Fielding Graduate University is pleased to announce the appointment of Steven A. Schapiro, EdD, as the interim dean of academic affairs. This position will play an important role in developing and implementing a new Fielding vision as well as insuring the integrity of its academic programs as the university undergoes significant re-structuring. “I am excited to take on this new position in order to help Fielding maintain and strengthen our leadership role in providing a progressive and truly student-centered approach to graduate education,” Schapiro stated. “In the challenging and competitive educational landscape in which we find ourselves, we have much to teach the higher education community about how to implement individualized, experiential, and competency-based learning. Our approach is not tied to “seat time” or an overly standardized curriculum, but to inquiry and authentic learning in response to individual and societal needs. At the same time, I believe that we can learn from other progressive and learner-centered institutions about doing critical and emancipatory teaching, creating collaborative learning communities in cyber-space, and responding to the needs of the tech savvy and increasingly diverse students of today.”

The new dean will eventually assume the role of accreditation liaison officer (ALO) and guide the faculty in the program review process among many other essential responsibilities. “As our new ALO,” Schapiro reflected, “I will be drawing on my experience in this role at one of our sister institutions, Goddard College. I see my role of ALO as serving as a bridge and translator between us and our accrediting agency, WASC; helping WASC to understand and appreciate the unique dimensions of our learning model and forms of authentic and performance based assessment, and helping us to understand and respond to WASC’s call for clarity about what outcomes we expect from our students’ learning experiences, how we assess that learning, and how we use that knowledge to improve our practices.”

Dr. Schapiro has enjoyed a distinguished career in higher education. He received his EdD in psychological education from the University of Massachusetts, an MAT in social studies from the Graduate School of Education at Harvard University, and a BA Magna Cum Laude in American studies from Yale University. His preparation for administration was strengthened by attendance at Harvard’s Institute for Educational Management. He has authored books, book chapters, and journal articles, and given over 50 scholarly presentations. Dr. Schapiro has served as a faculty member in Fielding’s School of Human & Organizational Development since 2000, and as the Malcolm Knowles Chair in Adult Learning since 2013. He has most recently served as senior co-chair of the Academic Senate Leadership Committee. His previous administrative work included dean for academic affairs at Goddard College where he also served as director of teacher education and special assistant to the president for Institutional Research and Planning. Dr. Schapiro will serve in the role of interim dean for the next two years before a national search is conducted.

Tags: EdD, fielding faculty, leadership, higher education, fielding graduate university, graduate education, education

Policing Black and Brown Communities: Dynamics of Race, Class and Gender

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Wed, Jul 15, 2015

Policing Black and Brown Communities: A Discussion about Dynamics of Race, Class and Gender

SS15_Ed_Series_graphic-policeIn the current national conversation about police activity and brutality, especially in low income neighborhoods of people of color, we recognize that there are intersecting issues of racial classification, economic class, as well as gender and gender expression at work on our streets. Through a panel of local experts and activists on various aspects of this situation, along with Fielding Graduate University faculty, a discussion titled Policing Black and Brown Communities: Dynamics of Race, Class and Gender will focus on the debate over the right-wrong, police-citizen, for police-against police debates to a deeper analysis. Understanding the historical relationships between identified groups (eg. racially, economically, gender-based) and law enforcement in this country can help us more clearly identify paths of action to promote social justice for all peoples, rather than demonizing them based on categorical status.

As part of its National Summer Session in Rosemont, IL, Fielding Graduate University invites the extended Chicago community to this educational discussion tonight, Wednesday, July 15, 2015 from 7–9 pm at the Westin O’Hare in Rosemont, IL. This event is free and open to the public.

GUEST PANELISTS

Monique W. Morris, EdD

monique-1Morris is an author and social justice scholar with more than 20 years of professional and volunteer experience in the areas of education, civil rights, juvenile and social justice.  Dr. Morris is the author of Black Stats: African Americans by the Numbers in the Twenty-First Century (The New Press, 2014), Too Beautiful for Words (MWM Books, 2012); and Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools (The New Press, 2016), a forthcoming book on the criminalization of Black girls in schools. She has written dozens of articles, book chapters, and other publications on social justice issues and lectured widely on research, policies, and practices associated with improving juvenile justice, educational, and socioeconomic conditions for Black girls, women, and their families.

Morris is co-founder of The National Black Women’s Justice Institute; a lecturer for Saint Mary’s College of California and an adjunct professor for the University of San Francisco. She is a 2012 Soros Justice Fellow, the former vice president for Economic Programs, Advocacy and Research at the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and the former director of Research for the Thelton E. Henderson Center for Social Justice at the UC Berkeley Law School. Morris has also worked in partnership with and served as a consultant for state and county agencies, national academic and research institutions, and communities throughout the nation to develop comprehensive approaches and training curricula to eliminate racial/ethnic and gender disparities in the justice system. Her work in this area has informed the development and implementation of improved culturally competent and gender-responsive continua of services for youth.

Morris’ research intersects race, gender, education and justice to explore the ways in which Black communities, and other communities of color, are uniquely affected by social policies. Among other publications, Morris is the author of "Representing the Educational Experiences of Black Girls in a Juvenile Court School" (Journal of Applied Research on Children, 2014); "Sacred Inquiry and Delinquent Black Girls: Developing a Foundation for a Liberative Pedagogical Praxis" (In Understanding Work Experiences from Multiple Perspectives, edited by G.D. Sardana and Tojo Thatchenkery, 2014); Educating the Caged Bird: Black Girls and the Juvenile Court School (Poverty & Race, PRRAC, 2013) and Race, Gender and the School to Prison Pipeline: Expanding Our Discussion to Include Black Girls (African American Policy Forum, 2012). Her 2008 study, A Higher Hurdle: Barriers to Employment for Formerly Incarcerated Women (UC Berkeley School of Law), which is one of the first testing studies to examine the impact of a criminal record or period of incarceration on the employment outcomes of women, was referenced in a special report commissioned by Congressman Danny K. Davis (D-IL).

Morris is a member of the OJJDP National Girls Institute Expert Panel and the California Board of State and Community Corrections’ Committee on Reducing Racial and Ethnic Disparity. She is also an advisory board member for Global Girl Media, Oakland and regular contributor to Ebony.com.

Chairty Tolliver

Tolliver is the Founder and Project Director of Black on Both Sides. A seasoned and nationally recognized youth development specialist, Tolliver grew up in the Englewood neighborhood of Chicago. She is a foster mother, writer, and spoken word artist, and former director of one of the largest and oldest organizing groups in Chicago, Southwest Youth Collaborative. In over thirteen years in the field of Youth Development, she has worked on campaigns on a broad range of issues, including fair housing, labor rights, school reform, prison reform, and LGBT youth rights. In 2012 she was selected as one of seven activists nationwide to receive the Alston Bannerman Fellowship, and is a 2013 George Soros Senior Justice Fellow. Charity identifies as a Black woman and mother, and uses feminine pronouns. She is not youth-identified, although the UN Declaration on the Rights of Youth might disagree.

Chacyln Hunt

Hunt is an attorney and police misconduct organizer in Chicago and works with youth of color and their experiences with police. Her project integrates civil rights education with research and legal strategy driven by the kids' everyday experiences with law enforcement. The students she works with participate in role plays and produce interviews with their classmates. We (a group of professionals) spend months with the kids learning from them, and helping them gain a critical distance from their experiences in order to advocate for police accountability.             

For more information about this and other Fielding Educational Series sessions, please visit fielding.edu/events.

Tags: gender empowerment, EdD, Education Doctorate, diversity, organizational change, conversation, leadership, adult learning, national session, fielding graduate university, human rights, criminal justice

President of The Chicago School of Professional Psychology (TCSPP) Patricia Arredondo, EdD, to Discuss Latina Feminism

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Tue, Jul 14, 2015

Patricia Arredondo, EdD, to Discuss Latina Feminism at the Fielding Educational Series in Rosemont, IL

Latinas in the U.S. are in the process of claiming their power through higher education while navigating cultural divides in personal and professional relationships and in other social contexts.

SS15_Ed_Series_graphic-heart_ArredondoOn Wednesday, July 15, 2015 from 4–6 pm at the Westin O’Hare in Rosemont, IL, the Chicago Campus President of The Chicago School of Professional Psychology (TCSPP) Patricia Arredondo, EdD will discuss how Latina feminism influences peoples relationship-oriented cultural worldview and sense of fairness and social justice. As part of its National Summer Session in Rosemont, IL, Fielding Graduate University invites the extended Chicago community to join this educational presentation sponsored by Fielding’s Worldwide Network for Gender Empowerment, titled Leading from the Heart and Cultural Roots. This event is free and open to the public.                                                                                  

Latina feminism is influenced by our relationship-oriented cultural worldview and sense of fairness and social justice. This feminist framework is rooted in historic events that place a value on education, community engagement, and compassion. Latinas in the U.S. are in the process of claiming their power through higher education while navigating cultural divides in personal and professional relationships and in other social contexts. Dr. Arredondo will present concepts and models, often invisible to Latinas themselves that contribute to our sense of identity and empowerment.

About Patricia Arredondo, EdD

Arredondo_Commencement_PhotoPatricia Arredondo, EdD, became Chicago Campus President of The Chicago School of Professional Psychology (TCSPP) in February 2013. She joined the school after successfully serving in senior administrative roles with the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and Arizona State University. Additionally, she led an organizational consulting firm addressing diversity in the workplace in Boston for 13 years. As of June 2015, she has assumed a new position with TCSPP as Senior Advisor for Institutional Initiatives.

In the academic world, Arredondo is a national leader and scholar on many fronts, extensively published in the areas of multicultural competency development, immigrant issues in counseling, counseling with Latinas/os, women’s leadership and, organizational diversity. She has authored more than 100 referred journal articles, book chapters, and training videos and is regularly invited for keynote addresses nationally and internationally. Her latest book, Culturally Responsive Counseling for Latinas/os was published in 2014 by the American Counseling Association (ACA) Press. Currently, Arredondo is also co-principal Investigator on a three-year training grant from the National Science Foundation that advances women of color in the STEM fields to administrative opportunities at Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Tribal Colleges. She considers herself a social justice advocate and an educator at heart.

Civic and professional organization leadership is visible throughout Arredondo’s career. She served as president of four national associations, among these was the American Counseling Association (ACA), the largest counseling association in the world. She is the only Latina to serve in that position. Arredondo was also president of the American Psychological Association Division 45 - Society for the Psychological Study of Ethnic Minority Issues, the Association of Multicultural Counseling and Development of the ACA and the founding president of the National Latina/o Psychological. In the civic arena, Arredondo has always been active in community activities. Among her leadership roles were president of the Board of Family and Children’s Services in Boston, on the board of the Diversity Leadership Committee for the City of Phoenix, Vice-Chair of the Social Development Commission for Milwaukee County, the largest anti-poverty organization in Wisconsin, and more recently she was appointed to the Advisory Board for DiversityMBA Magazine in Chicago. She chairs the Board of Professional Affairs for the American Psychological Association.

Arredondo has been the recipient of many awards and recognitions throughout her career. Many of these awards acknowledge her as a “pioneer” or change agent in her profession. She is the 2013 recipient of the prestigious Henry Tomes Award for Distinguished Lifetime Contributions to the Advancement of Ethnic Minority Psychology, the “Living Legend” award from the ACA, the Lifetime Achievement Award from APA Division 45, the Madrina Award by the National Latina/o Psychological Association, and an honorary degree from the University of San Diego; she also holds Fellow status with the American Counseling and American Psychological Associations. She enjoys promoting women’s leadership, mentoring graduate students, emerging professionals, entrepreneurs, and individuals who want to make a difference on behalf of others.

Arredondo holds degrees from Kent State University, Boston College, and Boston University. She is a licensed psychologist and bilingual in English and Spanish. Arredondo is extremely proud of her Mexican American heritage. Arredondo is family-centered and enjoys her extended family engagements across the country.

 For more information about all of the Fielding Educational Series please visit https://www.eventbrite.com/e/fielding-educational-series-summer-2015-registration-17487812518.

Tags: EdD, social justice, educational leadership, diversity, sociology, leadership, adult learning, fielding graduate university, human rights, learning

HOD Faculty Member Barclay Hudson Granted Faculty Emeritus

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Mon, Jun 02, 2014

Barclay Hudson, EdD

Master's Faculty Member - School of Human & Organizational Development

Hudson Granted Faculty Emeritus by the Fielding Board of Trustees in April 2014.

Barclay HusdonBarclay Hudson is a consulting economist, educator, and environmental policy analyst with wide-ranging experience in organizational development and academic research. He received his EdD in educational planning and organizational development from Harvard University, where he also did undergraduate work in economics, including forecasting studies under Nobel Prize-winner Wassily Leontief. His doctoral studies led to several years of overseas work in technical assistance programs promoting educational and economic development in Chile, Costa Rica, Bangladesh, and Tunisia, under the sponsorship of the Ford Foundation, Harvard University, the United Nations, and other agencies.

Hudson has been a founding faculty member of three innovative graduate programs: Fielding's online Masters Program in Organizational Management; the Interdisciplinary Program in Urban Studies at the Catholic University of Chile; and the UCLA Graduate Program in Urban Planning.

During most of the 1980s, he worked full-time as project manager, economist, and industrial process analyst with a Los Angeles-based engineering firm specializing in economic and technical assessment of emerging technology, including business development based on commercialization of technologies developed in aerospace. He has also taught professional business workshops and seminars with numerous clients including Price Waterhouse and Gulf Oil.

Hudson has a long-standing professional involvement in environmental programs. In the early 1990s he served as Acting Director for the nonprofit organization, EcoSource International, designated by the U.S. EPA, Region 9 as its West Coast Institute for Cooperative Environmental Management, to promote public-private partnerships for the adaptation of emerging technology on pollution prevention. Since 1992, he is (part-time) Special Projects Coordinator for environmental programs (research, teaching, public outreach) at the California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, at the university's Center for Regenerative Studies and LandLab. His current work focuses on urban forests, their public benefits, and private sector returns on investment.

Hudson's recent publications on distance learning include book chapters on concepts of "candlepower," "the jungle syndrome,"and complexity theory applied to online learning; an article for the Sage Encyclopedia of Distributed Learning; and a research paper on "The 80/20 Principle Applied to Redesign of Faculty Roles Online." Work continuing on development of short "academic toolkits" for collaborative work online (several dozen so far, most in support of masters thesis research projects); and investigation of the "dialectics of critical appreciation," looking for ways to achieve better balance (or creative tension) between appreciative inquiry and critical thinking.

Tags: Faculty Emeritus, EdD, fielding faculty, fielding graduate university

Fielding Graduate University Named Member of the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Tue, Apr 22, 2014

carnegie resized 600Fielding Graduate University President Katrina Rogers is pleased to announce that Fielding’s School of Educational Leadership for Change has been selected for inclusion in the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate (CPED).

The CPED is a consortium of colleges and schools of education who are working together on a critical examination of the doctorate in education (EdD). Fielding one of 87 institutions working in collaboration to redesign the EdD and will comprise the third cohort to join the Consortium.

In a press release from CPED Executive Director Jill A. Perry, the following was announced:

The Executive Director of the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate is pleased to announce the addition of 33 new member institutions and four additional California State System campuses. Of this new cohort, CPED will have its first international membership with two institutions from Canada and one from New Zealand. “The expansion of the Consortium to a third cohort speaks to the credibility of this faculty-led effort and to our dedication to learn from diverse settings around the US and beyond its borders as a means to develop the strongest professional preparation in education,” stated Jill A. Perry, the Executive Director.

The vision of the Consortium is to transform the EdD (referred to as a Professional Practice Doctorate within the Consortium) into the degree of choice for preparing the next generation of practitioner experts and school (K-12) college leaders in Education, especially those who will generate new knowledge and scholarship about educational practice (or related policies) and will have responsibility for stewarding the Education profession.  

This vision aligns with Fielding’s academic quality and innovation strategic objective about aligning existing degree programs with current market trends and demands of the profession and needs of society.

This initiative was led by Mario Borunda, EdD, Fielding's interim provost, along with Fielding faculty members Nicola Smith, MDA, JD, Kathy Tiner, PhD, and Anna DiStefano, EdDPresident Rogers stated, “They are to be commended for achieving this goal, which puts Fielding squarely into a national conversation on the future of education doctorates.”

About the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate (CPED)

The Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate (CPED) is a Consortium of colleges and schools of education, which have committed resources to work together to undertake a critical examination of the doctorate in education (EdD) through dialog, experimentation, critical feedback and evaluation.

The vision of the Consortium is to transform the EdD (referred to as a Professional Practice Doctorate within the Consortium) into the degree of choice for preparing the next generation of practitioner experts and school (K-12) college leaders in Education, especially those who will generate new knowledge and scholarship about educational practice (or related policies) and will have responsibility for stewarding the Education profession.

To accomplish this vision, the mission of the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate (CPED) is to improve the way in which professional educators are prepared by redesigning all aspects of EdD programs including: curriculum, assessments, admissions, etc. The CPED initiative currently has its headquarters at the School of Education at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, PA.

CONTACT:

Jill A. Perry, PhD, Executive Director   

Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate

(c) 301.204.2644 (o) 412.396.4341

jillaperry@cpedinitiative.org    http://CPEDinitiative.org

Tags: EdD, Education Doctorate, educational leadership, fielding graduate university, graduate education, Carnegie Project