Fielding Graduate University News

Policing Black and Brown Communities: Dynamics of Race, Class and Gender

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Wed, Jul 15, 2015

Policing Black and Brown Communities: A Discussion about Dynamics of Race, Class and Gender

SS15_Ed_Series_graphic-policeIn the current national conversation about police activity and brutality, especially in low income neighborhoods of people of color, we recognize that there are intersecting issues of racial classification, economic class, as well as gender and gender expression at work on our streets. Through a panel of local experts and activists on various aspects of this situation, along with Fielding Graduate University faculty, a discussion titled Policing Black and Brown Communities: Dynamics of Race, Class and Gender will focus on the debate over the right-wrong, police-citizen, for police-against police debates to a deeper analysis. Understanding the historical relationships between identified groups (eg. racially, economically, gender-based) and law enforcement in this country can help us more clearly identify paths of action to promote social justice for all peoples, rather than demonizing them based on categorical status.

As part of its National Summer Session in Rosemont, IL, Fielding Graduate University invites the extended Chicago community to this educational discussion tonight, Wednesday, July 15, 2015 from 7–9 pm at the Westin O’Hare in Rosemont, IL. This event is free and open to the public.

GUEST PANELISTS

Monique W. Morris, EdD

monique-1Morris is an author and social justice scholar with more than 20 years of professional and volunteer experience in the areas of education, civil rights, juvenile and social justice.  Dr. Morris is the author of Black Stats: African Americans by the Numbers in the Twenty-First Century (The New Press, 2014), Too Beautiful for Words (MWM Books, 2012); and Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools (The New Press, 2016), a forthcoming book on the criminalization of Black girls in schools. She has written dozens of articles, book chapters, and other publications on social justice issues and lectured widely on research, policies, and practices associated with improving juvenile justice, educational, and socioeconomic conditions for Black girls, women, and their families.

Morris is co-founder of The National Black Women’s Justice Institute; a lecturer for Saint Mary’s College of California and an adjunct professor for the University of San Francisco. She is a 2012 Soros Justice Fellow, the former vice president for Economic Programs, Advocacy and Research at the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and the former director of Research for the Thelton E. Henderson Center for Social Justice at the UC Berkeley Law School. Morris has also worked in partnership with and served as a consultant for state and county agencies, national academic and research institutions, and communities throughout the nation to develop comprehensive approaches and training curricula to eliminate racial/ethnic and gender disparities in the justice system. Her work in this area has informed the development and implementation of improved culturally competent and gender-responsive continua of services for youth.

Morris’ research intersects race, gender, education and justice to explore the ways in which Black communities, and other communities of color, are uniquely affected by social policies. Among other publications, Morris is the author of "Representing the Educational Experiences of Black Girls in a Juvenile Court School" (Journal of Applied Research on Children, 2014); "Sacred Inquiry and Delinquent Black Girls: Developing a Foundation for a Liberative Pedagogical Praxis" (In Understanding Work Experiences from Multiple Perspectives, edited by G.D. Sardana and Tojo Thatchenkery, 2014); Educating the Caged Bird: Black Girls and the Juvenile Court School (Poverty & Race, PRRAC, 2013) and Race, Gender and the School to Prison Pipeline: Expanding Our Discussion to Include Black Girls (African American Policy Forum, 2012). Her 2008 study, A Higher Hurdle: Barriers to Employment for Formerly Incarcerated Women (UC Berkeley School of Law), which is one of the first testing studies to examine the impact of a criminal record or period of incarceration on the employment outcomes of women, was referenced in a special report commissioned by Congressman Danny K. Davis (D-IL).

Morris is a member of the OJJDP National Girls Institute Expert Panel and the California Board of State and Community Corrections’ Committee on Reducing Racial and Ethnic Disparity. She is also an advisory board member for Global Girl Media, Oakland and regular contributor to Ebony.com.

Chairty Tolliver

Tolliver is the Founder and Project Director of Black on Both Sides. A seasoned and nationally recognized youth development specialist, Tolliver grew up in the Englewood neighborhood of Chicago. She is a foster mother, writer, and spoken word artist, and former director of one of the largest and oldest organizing groups in Chicago, Southwest Youth Collaborative. In over thirteen years in the field of Youth Development, she has worked on campaigns on a broad range of issues, including fair housing, labor rights, school reform, prison reform, and LGBT youth rights. In 2012 she was selected as one of seven activists nationwide to receive the Alston Bannerman Fellowship, and is a 2013 George Soros Senior Justice Fellow. Charity identifies as a Black woman and mother, and uses feminine pronouns. She is not youth-identified, although the UN Declaration on the Rights of Youth might disagree.

Chacyln Hunt

Hunt is an attorney and police misconduct organizer in Chicago and works with youth of color and their experiences with police. Her project integrates civil rights education with research and legal strategy driven by the kids' everyday experiences with law enforcement. The students she works with participate in role plays and produce interviews with their classmates. We (a group of professionals) spend months with the kids learning from them, and helping them gain a critical distance from their experiences in order to advocate for police accountability.             

For more information about this and other Fielding Educational Series sessions, please visit fielding.edu/events.

Tags: gender empowerment, EdD, Education Doctorate, diversity, organizational change, conversation, leadership, adult learning, national session, fielding graduate university, human rights, criminal justice

Fielding Graduate University Named Member of the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Tue, Apr 22, 2014

carnegie resized 600Fielding Graduate University President Katrina Rogers is pleased to announce that Fielding’s School of Educational Leadership for Change has been selected for inclusion in the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate (CPED).

The CPED is a consortium of colleges and schools of education who are working together on a critical examination of the doctorate in education (EdD). Fielding one of 87 institutions working in collaboration to redesign the EdD and will comprise the third cohort to join the Consortium.

In a press release from CPED Executive Director Jill A. Perry, the following was announced:

The Executive Director of the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate is pleased to announce the addition of 33 new member institutions and four additional California State System campuses. Of this new cohort, CPED will have its first international membership with two institutions from Canada and one from New Zealand. “The expansion of the Consortium to a third cohort speaks to the credibility of this faculty-led effort and to our dedication to learn from diverse settings around the US and beyond its borders as a means to develop the strongest professional preparation in education,” stated Jill A. Perry, the Executive Director.

The vision of the Consortium is to transform the EdD (referred to as a Professional Practice Doctorate within the Consortium) into the degree of choice for preparing the next generation of practitioner experts and school (K-12) college leaders in Education, especially those who will generate new knowledge and scholarship about educational practice (or related policies) and will have responsibility for stewarding the Education profession.  

This vision aligns with Fielding’s academic quality and innovation strategic objective about aligning existing degree programs with current market trends and demands of the profession and needs of society.

This initiative was led by Mario Borunda, EdD, Fielding's interim provost, along with Fielding faculty members Nicola Smith, MDA, JD, Kathy Tiner, PhD, and Anna DiStefano, EdDPresident Rogers stated, “They are to be commended for achieving this goal, which puts Fielding squarely into a national conversation on the future of education doctorates.”

About the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate (CPED)

The Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate (CPED) is a Consortium of colleges and schools of education, which have committed resources to work together to undertake a critical examination of the doctorate in education (EdD) through dialog, experimentation, critical feedback and evaluation.

The vision of the Consortium is to transform the EdD (referred to as a Professional Practice Doctorate within the Consortium) into the degree of choice for preparing the next generation of practitioner experts and school (K-12) college leaders in Education, especially those who will generate new knowledge and scholarship about educational practice (or related policies) and will have responsibility for stewarding the Education profession.

To accomplish this vision, the mission of the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate (CPED) is to improve the way in which professional educators are prepared by redesigning all aspects of EdD programs including: curriculum, assessments, admissions, etc. The CPED initiative currently has its headquarters at the School of Education at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, PA.

CONTACT:

Jill A. Perry, PhD, Executive Director   

Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate

(c) 301.204.2644 (o) 412.396.4341

jillaperry@cpedinitiative.org    http://CPEDinitiative.org

Tags: EdD, Education Doctorate, educational leadership, fielding graduate university, graduate education, Carnegie Project