Fielding Graduate University News

Fielding Signs Partnership Agreement With the University of the Virgin Islands

Posted by Hilary Molina on Wed, Aug 19, 2015

Fielding Graduate University is partnering with the University of the Virgin Islands (UVI) who also reached agreements with the University of St. Maarten, Philipsburg, St. Maarten; the Council of Community Colleges of Jamaica, Kingston, Jamaica; Nantong University, China; Yangzhou University, China; and the University of Nebraska at Omaha.

UVI MOU Fielding

 

Photo courtesy of University of the Virgin Islands

Back row left to right: Dr. Orlando Taylor, Fielding VP of Strategic Initiatives; Dr. Linda Thomas, UVI Dean, School of Education; Dr. James S. Maddirala, UVI Associate Provost for Graduate, Global and Academic Affairs; Dr. Stephen Reames, UVI Dean, School of Business; Dr. Dorothy Agger-Gupta, Program Director, Fielding School of Human & Organizational Development ; Dr. Habtes Yegin, UVI Professor of Education. Front row left to right: Dr. Camille McKayle, UVI Provost; Dr. David Hall, UVI President ; Dr. Katrina Rogers, Fielding President; Dr. Linda Honold, Chair, Fielding Board of Trustees.

Each of the agreements, known as memoranda of understanding (MOU), are unique and share a spirit of cooperation and understanding. UVI’s MOU with Fielding is intended to establish mutually beneficial collaborations in academic programs, research, the pursuit of grants, continuing education, and certificate programs. “The common goal of the MOUs is to enhance the UVI experience, either by having students from other parts of the world in the classroom here at UVI or by having UVI students sit in the classrooms around the world,” said UVI Provost Dr. Camille McKayle, “A 21st Century education needs to be a global education. UVI graduates will find themselves in work environments with people from around the world, actually and virtually. UVI aims to prepare them for that environment by giving them opportunities to see that world so that it is a less daunting place.”

The general objective of the agreement with Fielding is to engage in long-term collaboration in fields that are compatible with the orientation and expertise of each institution. The MOU provides for possible collaborations involving a PhD collaborative program in leadership with agreed upon credits transferable from one institution to the other. This collaboration will target, though not exclusively, Fielding’s Schools of Human and Organizational Development and School of Education Leadership for Change. Students will be able to study several concentrations including, academic leadership, political leadership, ecological justice leadership and health leadership.

According to the MOU other possible collaborations include:

  • Joint courtesy/adjunct faculty appointments to support PhD degree programs at each institution
  • Faculty exchanges
  • Continuing education opportunities on selected topics
  • Faculty development in competency based education and/or prior learning assessments
  • Faculty development and technical support in instructional design
  • Joint research activity in areas of mutual interest and expertise
  • Joint applications for external grants in areas of mutual interest and expertise
  • Possible establishment of a formal center or institute on leadership and diversity to house Fielding/UVI activity possibly in conjunction with Fielding’s Institute for Social Innovation or Fielding’s new Marie Fielder Center on Democracy, Leadership and Education.
  • Joint marketing and student recruitment domestically and internationally
  • Periodic Fielding residencies in the Virgin Islands; UVI residencies in Santa Barbara, CA

The MOU is for three years with an automatic renewal unless terminated.

Fielding Graduate University President Katrina Rogers, PhD stated, “We are honored to be working with the University of Virgin Islands to support our mutual goals to develop leadership across the globe for the complex, often difficult conditions, our graduates will face over the course of their careers.  We look forward to many years of a partnership to create effective educational offerings for students that assist them in attaining their professional goals and provide skills and knowledge for their lifetime.”

Tags: globalization, educational leadership, Organizational development, fielding faculty, Competency Based Education, Distributed education, fielding graduate university, graduate education, human development, institue for social innovation, scholar practitioner

Fielding Awards Honorary Degree to Michael B. Goldstein, JD

Posted by Hilary Molina on Mon, Aug 03, 2015

Convocation 2015 8541 mike and katrina resized 600On July 19, 2015, Fielding Graduate University President Katrina Rogers, PhD, conferred the honorary doctorate of humane letters on Michael B. Goldstein, JD, co-chair of the Higher Education practice of Cooley LLP. In awarding this distinction, Dr. Goldstein joined other honorees including globally-known educator Paolo Friere, civil rights activist Marie Fielder, renowned psychologist Bob Goulding, LGBTQ advocate Lynn Lukow and inspired educator Eddie Seashore.

During the hooding and conferral of the degree, President Rogers reflected on Dr. Goldstein’s accomplishments, “He is a pioneer in the development of the legal environment in higher education, a counselor at the highest levels of legislation, a leader in championing creative approaches to higher education and an advocate of the highest ideals of learning as a means towards a more just and sustainable future for humanity.”

Following the conferral, Dr.Goldstein delivered the commencement address to the Fielding Summer Session 2015 graduates titled “The Importance of Timing and Convergence: Learning to Love Competency Based Learning.” In his remarks, Dr. Goldstein pointed to the barriers to learning based not on time-in-seat but demonstrated competencies, proposing the creation of what he termed a “super-accreditor specifically for the purpose of reviewing and evaluating non-time-based approaches to teaching, learning and documenting competencies.”

Dr. Goldstein served a total of 23 years as a Fielding trustee, including as itsMike GoldsteinConvocation 2015 8575 resized 600 chair, before retiring from the board in 2015. In 2012, the board created the Michael B. Goldstein Endowed Board Scholarship for Dissertation Research Advancing Social Justice, in recognition of his longtime service as a trustee and distinguished leader. This scholarship supports research by Fielding doctoral candidates on topics that further the achievement of a specific aspect of social justice. President Rogers appointed Dr. Goldstein as co-chair of Fielding’s newly organized President’s Advisory Council.

Dr. Goldstein is the founder and headed the education practice at Dow Lohnes, which merged with Cooley in 2014. Dr. Goldstein is a pioneer in the development and rational regulation of online, competency based, and other nontraditional modes of learning, including the creation of innovative approaches to combining the resources of the nonprofit, public, and for-profit sectors to improve access to quality higher education. He is the 2014 recipient of WCET’s Richard Jonsen Award for leadership in e-learning and is widely recognized for his distinguished service to many higher educational organizations.

Before entering private law practice, Dr. Goldstein was Associate Vice Chancellor for Urban and Governmental Affairs and Associate Professor of Urban Sciences at the University of Illinois-Chicago. Prior to that, he was an Assistant City Administrator and the Director Of University Relations for New York City. Dr. Goldstein holds a BA from Cornell University, a JD from New York University and was a Loeb Fellow at the Graduate School of Design, Harvard University.

Tags: social justice, educational leadership, conference, Competency Based Education, leadership, Distributed education, national session, higher education, fielding graduate university, graduate education, scholar activist, scholar practitioner

President of The Chicago School of Professional Psychology (TCSPP) Patricia Arredondo, EdD, to Discuss Latina Feminism

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Tue, Jul 14, 2015

Patricia Arredondo, EdD, to Discuss Latina Feminism at the Fielding Educational Series in Rosemont, IL

Latinas in the U.S. are in the process of claiming their power through higher education while navigating cultural divides in personal and professional relationships and in other social contexts.

SS15_Ed_Series_graphic-heart_ArredondoOn Wednesday, July 15, 2015 from 4–6 pm at the Westin O’Hare in Rosemont, IL, the Chicago Campus President of The Chicago School of Professional Psychology (TCSPP) Patricia Arredondo, EdD will discuss how Latina feminism influences peoples relationship-oriented cultural worldview and sense of fairness and social justice. As part of its National Summer Session in Rosemont, IL, Fielding Graduate University invites the extended Chicago community to join this educational presentation sponsored by Fielding’s Worldwide Network for Gender Empowerment, titled Leading from the Heart and Cultural Roots. This event is free and open to the public.                                                                                  

Latina feminism is influenced by our relationship-oriented cultural worldview and sense of fairness and social justice. This feminist framework is rooted in historic events that place a value on education, community engagement, and compassion. Latinas in the U.S. are in the process of claiming their power through higher education while navigating cultural divides in personal and professional relationships and in other social contexts. Dr. Arredondo will present concepts and models, often invisible to Latinas themselves that contribute to our sense of identity and empowerment.

About Patricia Arredondo, EdD

Arredondo_Commencement_PhotoPatricia Arredondo, EdD, became Chicago Campus President of The Chicago School of Professional Psychology (TCSPP) in February 2013. She joined the school after successfully serving in senior administrative roles with the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and Arizona State University. Additionally, she led an organizational consulting firm addressing diversity in the workplace in Boston for 13 years. As of June 2015, she has assumed a new position with TCSPP as Senior Advisor for Institutional Initiatives.

In the academic world, Arredondo is a national leader and scholar on many fronts, extensively published in the areas of multicultural competency development, immigrant issues in counseling, counseling with Latinas/os, women’s leadership and, organizational diversity. She has authored more than 100 referred journal articles, book chapters, and training videos and is regularly invited for keynote addresses nationally and internationally. Her latest book, Culturally Responsive Counseling for Latinas/os was published in 2014 by the American Counseling Association (ACA) Press. Currently, Arredondo is also co-principal Investigator on a three-year training grant from the National Science Foundation that advances women of color in the STEM fields to administrative opportunities at Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Tribal Colleges. She considers herself a social justice advocate and an educator at heart.

Civic and professional organization leadership is visible throughout Arredondo’s career. She served as president of four national associations, among these was the American Counseling Association (ACA), the largest counseling association in the world. She is the only Latina to serve in that position. Arredondo was also president of the American Psychological Association Division 45 - Society for the Psychological Study of Ethnic Minority Issues, the Association of Multicultural Counseling and Development of the ACA and the founding president of the National Latina/o Psychological. In the civic arena, Arredondo has always been active in community activities. Among her leadership roles were president of the Board of Family and Children’s Services in Boston, on the board of the Diversity Leadership Committee for the City of Phoenix, Vice-Chair of the Social Development Commission for Milwaukee County, the largest anti-poverty organization in Wisconsin, and more recently she was appointed to the Advisory Board for DiversityMBA Magazine in Chicago. She chairs the Board of Professional Affairs for the American Psychological Association.

Arredondo has been the recipient of many awards and recognitions throughout her career. Many of these awards acknowledge her as a “pioneer” or change agent in her profession. She is the 2013 recipient of the prestigious Henry Tomes Award for Distinguished Lifetime Contributions to the Advancement of Ethnic Minority Psychology, the “Living Legend” award from the ACA, the Lifetime Achievement Award from APA Division 45, the Madrina Award by the National Latina/o Psychological Association, and an honorary degree from the University of San Diego; she also holds Fellow status with the American Counseling and American Psychological Associations. She enjoys promoting women’s leadership, mentoring graduate students, emerging professionals, entrepreneurs, and individuals who want to make a difference on behalf of others.

Arredondo holds degrees from Kent State University, Boston College, and Boston University. She is a licensed psychologist and bilingual in English and Spanish. Arredondo is extremely proud of her Mexican American heritage. Arredondo is family-centered and enjoys her extended family engagements across the country.

 For more information about all of the Fielding Educational Series please visit https://www.eventbrite.com/e/fielding-educational-series-summer-2015-registration-17487812518.

Tags: EdD, social justice, educational leadership, diversity, sociology, leadership, adult learning, fielding graduate university, human rights, learning

Fielding Selected as a 2015 Best Value School Award Recipient

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Thu, May 21, 2015

Fielding Graduate University has been selected out of nearly 8,000 postsecondary schools as the recipient of a Best Value School award.

Best Value Award 2015The award is issued by University Research & Review (URR) (https://www.urandr.org/about-us), a company dedicated to improving the process of how a student selects a postsecondary school.

“Given Fielding’s focus on providing affordable and personalized graduate education through our technologically-advanced face to face learning model, we are truly honored to receive the Best Value School award for a second consecutive year,” noted Fielding President Katrina Rogers, PhD.

President Rogers accepted the award on behalf of the university from URR founder Joseph Schmoke. "It is our distinguished pleasure to present the award to Fielding Graduate University," Schmoke states. "We hope current students and alumni take pride in this honor and anyone searching for a quality, reasonably priced college education strongly considers Fielding."

The committee that reviewed more than l00 nominees out of the thousands of eligible schools is made up of former university presidents, CEOs, provosts and professors. Schools cannot pay to receive the award; it has to be earned through the nomination and committee evaluation process. Fielding was chosen by the committee because it passed rigorous standards including a combination of cost, accreditation, variety and quality of school programs, and student satisfaction with the institution.

President Rogers added, “Here at Fielding, we hold ourselves to the highest educational standards to foster individual development, community collaboration and societal engagement. We are proud to be recognized for the true value we bring to our students’ educational careers.”

“Our committee prides itself on combining our extensive experience, knowledge of postsecondary education and insight into what provides students with good value when selecting a Best Value award recipient,” said Schmoke.

Fielding will retain the Best Value School designation for one year. Award recipients must re-qualify every year.

 URR medallion 2015BV medallion 2015

Tags: educational leadership, leadership, adult learning, higher education, fielding graduate university, graduate education

Fielding Awarded the Carnegie Community Engagement Classification

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Thu, Jan 08, 2015

Fielding Graduate University Awarded the Carnegie Foundation Advancement of Teaching for Community Engagement Classification

The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching has selected Fielding Graduate University as one of 240 U.S. colleges and universities to receive its 2015 Community Engagement Classification.

Carnegie CEC digital seal resized 600Colleges and universities with an institutional focus on community engagement were invited to apply for the classification, first offered in 2006 as part of an extensive restructuring of The Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. Unlike the Foundation’s other classifications that rely on national data, this is an “elective” classification—institutions participated voluntarily by submitting required materials describing the nature and extent of their engagement with the community, be it local or beyond. This approach enabled the Foundation to address elements of institutional mission and distinctiveness that are not represented in the national data on colleges and universities. “The importance of this elective classification is borne out by the response of so many campuses that have demonstrated their deep engagement with local, regional, national, and global communities,” said John Saltmarsh, director of the New England Resource Center for Higher Education (NERCHE). “These are campuses that are improving teaching and learning, producing research that makes a difference in communities, and revitalizing their civic and academic missions.”

Fielding President Katrina Rogers, PhD, noted, “Our leadership sees community engagement as one of the key values of the institution. It is reflected in our strategic plan and the ways in which Fielding manifests community engagement through its mission and educational enterprise. We define community engagement as the actions that we take as an institution and through our graduates to create positive social change using the best research and practice. Our stated values support community engagement in various ways, emphasizing community building internally and externally, diversity, learner-centered education, social justice, and transformational learning.”

Fielding Graduate University was founded in 1974 as an independent non-profit graduate school, dedicated to learning for experienced, mid-career adults. Fielding’s student population consists of 1,200 with 130 faculty members all across the United States. Long before the internet, Fielding invented a pedagogical model that enabled individuals to participate in high quality graduate learning from a distance and in small groups in their communities. Fielding’s vision then and now is based on the notion that adults deserve access to graduate learning that they can apply in their communities as they study, and not only when they finish. From the beginning, Fielding expected its students to be engaged in their communities, taking from their educational experience the more relevant theories to address local issues.

Fielding’s vision for their students role in community engagement is two-fold: 1) to build a high level of knowledge and skills for their graduates to be effective in collaboration and change work; and 2) to enact through their centers and curricula the multiple ways in which Fielding can make a contribution to society. Fielding’s community engagement-focused efforts are most apparent within Fielding’s Institute for Social Innovation (ISI). The ISI’s mission and function is to turn knowledge into action for the workplace and local communities. The programs currently under the ISI include: the Women’s Network for Gender Empowerment, the Nonprofit Leadership Certificate, the World Cafe, and Evidence-Based Coaching certificates. The ISI’s Center for Public Life, is funded by a grant from the Kettering Foundation to support the Center’s services to local non-profits in the central coast region of California.

The Foundation, through the work of the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education, developed the first typology of American colleges and universities in 1970 as a research tool to describe and represent the diversity of U.S. higher education. The Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education (now housed at Indiana University Bloomington's Center for Postsecondary Research) continues to be used for a wide range of purposes by academic researchers, institutional personnel, policymakers and others.

A listing of the institutions that hold the Community Engagement Classification can be found on NERCHE’s website.

Tags: educational leadership, organizational change, evidence based coaching, higher education, fielding graduate university, graduate education, human development, institue for social innovation, Carnegie Project

Fielding Introduces New Program at the ICDL Conference in Boston

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Tue, Dec 16, 2014

Fielding Graduate University Introduces New Infant and Early Childhood Development (IECD) PhD program to 200 members of Interdisciplinary Council on Development and Learning (ICDL)

President Katrina Rogers, PhD, along with School of Educational Leadership for Change (ELC) Program Director Kathy Tiner, PhD, ELC faculty member Jenny Edwards, PhD, psychology faculty ICDL Conference 2member Debra Bendell, PhD, adjunct faculty and Program Leader, Infant and Early Childhood Development (IECD) Ira Glovinsky, PhD, and Admissions Advisor Bob Harriman attended the (ICDL) Conference in November in Boston, MA. President Rogers introduced Fielding and the new Infant and Early Childhood Development (IECD) PhD program to 200 members of ICDL. ICDL is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to redefining and promoting each child’s development to their fullest potential (www.icdl.com). Fifteen Fielding IECD students were present and the following three students presented their graduate work: Melissa Grosvenor, Carrie Alvarado, and Sara McMahan. IECD ICDL Conference 1faculty Ira Glovinsky opened the session with a keynote presentation entitled "Emotions and Mood Dysregulation in Infants and Toddlers: The Neuroscience of Moods Including the Dyadic Transactions that Lead to Positive and Negative Moods." The conference was a huge success and Fielding’s presence was greatly appreciated.

Pictured in the top left photo:Fielding IECD students Cheryl Rock and Julie Sealy Directors of the Sunshine Stimulation Centre in Barbados
Pictured in the lower right photo: Carrie Alvarado and Melissa Grosvenor

Tags: educational leadership, psychology, higher education, fielding graduate university, graduate education, infant and childhood education

Fielding Acquires Doctoral Program

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Fri, Aug 29, 2014

Fielding Graduate University Acquires the Doctoral Program in Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health and Developmental Disorders from The Interdisciplinary Council on Development and Learning

IECD Brochure Fielding Graduate University has recently acquired a nationally recognized doctoral program in infant and early childhood development from The Interdisciplinary Council on Development and Learning (ICDL). This graduate program is dedicated to redefining and promoting each child's development to his or her fullest potential. The retitled PhD program, Infant and Early Childhood Development with an emphasis in mental health and developmental disorders, remains a multi-disciplinary doctoral program specializing in conditions such as autism spectrum, sensory integration, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and mood disorders. This program is the only program in the world to award such a combined PhD degree.

Infant mental health, as defined in the World Association for Infant Mental Health Handbook (2000), addresses “the social and emotional well-being of infants and their caregivers and the various contexts within which caregiving takes place” (Fitzgerald & Barton, 2000, p.21). Because infant development is woven into an emergent, active system of relationships, each class in the program emphasizes human relationships as the fulcrum around which all coursework is built.

A unique aspect of this graduate program, which was conceptualized by Stanley Greenspan, PhD, is to link different disciplines within a relationship-based developmental framework. Students study multiple factors affecting an infant’s and family’s wellbeing within a multi-disciplinary framework including mental health, education, occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech and language development, and the neurosciences.  The faculty teaches typical and atypical infant and family development using a curriculum that includes physiological, emotional, cognitive, behavioral, social, and cross-cultural perspectives. “ICDL has been proud to offer this program since 2007 and we look forward to the ongoing development of the program at Fielding” says the ICDL CEO, Jeffrey Guenzel. “This is a vital program that will continue to advance the field.”

President Katrina Rogers, PhD, commented, “We are so pleased to partner with ICDL in acquiring this high quality, nationally recognized and unique graduate program. Their areas of expertise are profound in the world of infant and childhood development. This new degree program will add to our array of offerings as we expand our footprint to serve this special population.”

Current students enrolled in the program come from several core disciplines including psychology, social work, counseling, psychiatry, occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech and language, and education. The students are attracted to this program because of the multidisciplinary individualized approach, and a distributed model that allows students to maintain their work life, family, and community responsibilities.

Don Cohon, PhD, president of ICDL Graduate School since 2012, remarked, “The ICDL Graduate School community is thrilled to announce that our program is becoming part of Fielding Graduate University, a WASC accredited institution of higher learning. The joining of our two schools achieves a long term goal of ICDL that will allow students the opportunity to obtain a PhD from an accredited university. ICDL and Fielding share a commitment to excellence in providing an interdisciplinary educational experience that draws upon a collaborative participatory approach to learning, and values the individuality of children, families, and communities. We are excited to be working together to provide our students with the knowledge and skills to make a significant positive impact on the field of infant and early childhood development.”

The PhD Infant and Early Childhood Development with an emphasis in mental health and developmental disorders program at Fielding Graduate University will begin in September 2014 with the existing students, and will enroll new students for the summer term beginning in April 2015.  For information call 805-898-4026 or email iecdadmission@fielding.edu.

Tags: educational leadership, Distributed education, fielding graduate university, teacher education

Teach-In for Public Education K-12 and Beyond

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Thu, Jun 26, 2014

teach in

Teach – In for Public Education K-12 and Beyond:

A critical exploration and discussion about the future of public schools in the age of standardized tests, corporate reforms, and neo-liberal economics.

As part of its National Summer Session in Rosemont, IL, Fielding Graduate University invites the extended Chicago community to join the panel discussion titled Teach-In on Public Education—K-12 and Beyond, on July 16, 7-10 pm at The Westin O'Hare, 6100 N River Rd, Rosemont, IL 60018.  This evening program will provide a critical exploration and discussion about the future of public schools in the age of standardized tests, corporate reforms, and neo-liberal economics. This conversation will be led by distinguished scholar-activists Michelle Fine,PhD, and Ira Shor, along with organizers Regina Tuma, PhD (Media Psychology Faculty) and Kathy Tiner-Sewell, PhD (Program Director, Educational Leadership for Change). In the true spirit of a teach-in this event is open and inclusive. Educators, students, activists and anyone interested in participating, sharing and discussing this topic is encouraged to attend. 

Regina TumaThe Teach-In on Public Education—K-12 and Beyond will draw attention to corporate educational and testing reforms which are threatening the very idea of public education across the nation. “Corporate education and testing reforms have long ceased to be about improving the quality of learning in our public schools. There is a need to develop empowering narratives and a counter-critique to corporate testing reforms and their effects,” Tuma stated. 

Fine, Shor and Tuma are among the founding members of Montclair (NJ) Cares About Schools, an activist parent group working in coalition with civil rights groups, NAACP, and teachers to provide alternatives to the logic of corporate test reforms in Montclair. Tuma added: “Montclair is an interesting case.  It is a progressive, mixed, hip suburb near New York City and flanked by Newark to its south. It is known for creative, progressive education and the town fought a hard battle to desegregate its schools, creating a model magnet system and de-tracked classrooms. Ironically, it also happens to be home to a ‘who’s who’ in the national education reform movement. Many of our neighbors in Montclair have been influential in determining the course of national policy in education. That fact alone adds a different tone and dimension to the rhetoric in Montclair. Let’s just say that it makes for awkward glances at the supermarket.”

Tiner-Sewell sees this conversation as a natural extension of Fielding values: "Michelle and Ira bring with them their experience as critical scholars and activists. Their presence at Fielding is appropriate given Fielding’s values of social justice, equity, and diversity as these are embodied through our scholar-practitioner model.”  She further reflected, “Graduate students have been coming to Fielding for 40 years to become agents of change and establish communities of practice in their own locales. In the true spirit of a teach-in, we hope to raise critical awareness of these issues on education.”  Tiner-Sewell emphasized that these reforms have the capacity to redefine learning and redefine the role of public education in a democracy. “Regina and I agree that one outcome of the teach-in is to promote conversations that can help our society think about the role of quality public education in a democracy. We are excited by this collaboration with Ira and Michelle and our extended collaboration with the broader Chicago-area community.”

Michelle FineMICHELLE FINE is Distinguished Professor of Social Psychology, Women’s Studies and Urban Education at the Graduate Center, City University of New York (CUNY).  A highly influential educator and activist, her work addresses questions of social injustice that sit at the intersection of public policy and social research, particularly with respect to youth in schools and criminal justice.

Michelle has authored, co-authored, or edited more than 20 books, 70 chapters in key national and international volumes, and 80 journal articles. Her most recent book, with Michael Fabricant, is “The Changing Politics of Education: Privatization and the Dispossessed Lives of Those Left Behind.” A recognized pioneer in participatory action research, Michelle’s scholarship and activism address critical issues of what she calls “circuits of dispossession and resistance,” documenting how youth contend with, are affected by, and resist inequities and the rising “punishment paradigm” in prisons, schools, communities, and social movements.

Her activism includes serving often as expert witness in gender, race, and education discrimination cases, including test-based graduation requirements in urban districts. Most recently, Michelle has been intensely involved with MCAS - Montclair (NJ) Cares About Schools - an activist group of parents working with educators, labor and civil rights groups, in a struggle over corporate reform and testing in a racially integrated suburban school district.

Ira ShorIRA SHOR is a Professor of Rhetoric/Composition at the City University of NY’s Graduate Center (PhD Program in English) and in the Dept. of English at the College of Staten Island/CUNY. Shor started the new doctorate in Rhetoric/Composition at the CUNY Grad Center in 1993. There, he directs dissertations and offers seminars in literacy, Paulo Freire and critical pedagogy, whiteness studies, composition theory and practice, and the rhetorics of domination and resistance. At the College of Staten Island/CUNY, he teaches first-year writing, non-fiction, coming-of-age narratives, multicultural literature, and mass media. His 9 published books include a 3-volume set in honor of the late Paulo Freire, the noted Brazilian educator who was his friend and mentor: “Critical Literacy in Action” (college language arts) and “Education is Politics” (Vol 1, k-12, and Vol. 2, Postsecondary Across the Curriculum). Shor’s work with Freire began in the early 1980s and lasted until Freire’s unfortunate passing in 1997. He and Freire co-authored “A Pedagogy for Liberation in 1986”, the first “talking” book Freire published with a collaborator. Shor also authored the widely used “Empowering Education” (1992) and “When Students Have Power”(1996), two foundational texts in critical teaching. His “Critical Teaching and Everyday Life”(1980) was the first book-length treatment of Freire-based critical methods in the North American context. That book grew out of Shor’s teaching for Open Admission students in the City University in the 1970s, where he helped build an experimental writing program recognized as one of three successful efforts in higher education. Coming to the CUNY in 1971 after a PhD at Wisconsin, he experimented with critical literacy, taught Basic Writing for 15 years, and now teaches first-year composition and graduate courses. 

Born in 1945 in the South Bronx of New York City, Shor attended public schools. After graduating from Bronx Science High School, Shor attended the University of Michigan (BA, English, 1966), then the University of Wisconsin (MA, 1968, and PhD, 1971), both sites of student activism in the 1960s. His dissertation was on Kurt Vonnegut whose fiction stood against elitism, war, and cruelty. After finishing his PhD, Shor started teaching comp and basic writing at Staten Island Community College, then a 2-year unit of CUNY. He joined the CUNY faculty when the democratic policies of Open Admissions and free tuition were under attack. 

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Tags: educational leadership, higher education, fielding graduate university, scholar activist, teacher education

James A. Banks to Receive The Fielding Social Justice Award

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Thu, May 08, 2014

FGU Seal web resized 600The Social Justice Award was established in 1986 by psychology alumna Lynn Friedman Kessler to recognize demonstrated concern for and commitment to the furtherance of social justice.

At Fielding Graduate University, social justice is the commitment to understanding, analyzing, and acting to reduce inequity, oppression and social stratification, recognizing the linkages between economics, social and ecological justice.

The hope is that the action for which the award is conferred will provide exemplary models of commitment to social justice for Fielding Graduate University and its members. The award is granted through the Office of the President and ia demonstrative of one of our core values, reducing the many forms of inequality.

The Fielding Graduate University Social Justice Award is given each year, one award to a Fielding student and/or alumni, and another will be made to a Fielding faculty and/or staff member. 

This evening, Thursday, May 8, 2014, at the University Club in San Francisco, CA, President Katrina Rogers is awarding the Fielding Graduate University Social Justice Award to James A. Banks in recognition for his exemplary commitment to social justice work through his extensive work in multicultural education.

James A. BanksBanks holds the Kerry and Linda Killinger Endowed Chair in Diversity Studies and is the founding director of the Center for Multicultural Education at the University of Washington, Seattle. He was the Russell F. Stark University Professor at the University of Washington from 2001 to 2006. Banks is a past president of the American Educational Research Association and of the National Council for the Social Studies.

He is a specialist in social studies education and multicultural education and has written widely in these fields. His books include Teaching Strategies for Ethnic Studies; Cultural Diversity and Education: Foundations, Curriculum, and Teaching; Educating Citizens in a Multicultural Society; and Race, Culture, and Education: The Selected Works of James A. Banks. Banks is the editor of the Handbook of Research on Multicultural Education; The Routledge International Companion to Multicultural Education; Diversity and Citizenship Education: Global Perspectives; and the Encyclopedia of Diversity in Education, published in 2012 by Sage in both hard and electronic editions.

banks quote

Banks is also the editor of the Multicultural Education Series of books published by Teachers College Press, Columbia University. There are now 52 published books in this Series; others are in development. Banks is a member of the National Academy of Education and a Fellow of the American Educational Research Association.

During the 2005-2006 academic year, Banks was a Spencer Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford. In 2007 he was the Tisch Distinguished Visiting Professor at Teachers College, Columbia University. He was a Visiting Distinguished Professor at the University of Hong Kong in 2010, a Visiting Professor at the Minzu University of China in 2011 (in Beijing), and a Visiting Professor at Northwest Normal University in Lanzhou, China in 2012.

He holds honorary doctorates from the Bank Street College of Education (New York), the University of Alaska Fairbanks, the University of Wisconsin–Parkside, DePaul University, Lewis and Clark College, and Grinnell College and is a recipient of the UCLA Medal, the university’s highest honor. In 2005, Banks delivered the 29th Annual Faculty Lecture at the University of Washington, the highest honor given to a professor at the University. 

Research by Banks on how educational institutions can improve race and ethnic relations has greatly influenced schools, colleges, and universities throughout the United States and the world. Banks has given lectures on citizenship education and diversity in many different nations, including Australia, Canada, China, Cyprus, England, Ethiopia, France, Germany, Greece, Hong Kong, Ireland, Israel, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Norway, Russia, Scotland, Singapore, Sweden, and New Zealand. His books have been translated into Greek, Japanese, Chinese, Korean, and Turkish.

Past recipients include:

  • Paolo Friere
  • Jan Hively
  • Valerie Bentz
  • Jodie Morrow
  • Peter Park
  • Jodie Veroff
  • Argentine Craig
  • Leonard Baca
  • Cathy Royal
  • Christine Ho
  • Pat Kilby-Robb
  • Isidro Ruby
  • Susan Cortez
  • Judy Colemans
  • Susan Ferrant
  • Susan Taira

For more information about social justice work at Fielding: http://www.fielding.edu/whyFielding/social-justice

 

 

Tags: social justice, educational leadership, diversity, multicultural, fielding graduate university

Fielding Graduate University Named Member of the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Tue, Apr 22, 2014

carnegie resized 600Fielding Graduate University President Katrina Rogers is pleased to announce that Fielding’s School of Educational Leadership for Change has been selected for inclusion in the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate (CPED).

The CPED is a consortium of colleges and schools of education who are working together on a critical examination of the doctorate in education (EdD). Fielding one of 87 institutions working in collaboration to redesign the EdD and will comprise the third cohort to join the Consortium.

In a press release from CPED Executive Director Jill A. Perry, the following was announced:

The Executive Director of the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate is pleased to announce the addition of 33 new member institutions and four additional California State System campuses. Of this new cohort, CPED will have its first international membership with two institutions from Canada and one from New Zealand. “The expansion of the Consortium to a third cohort speaks to the credibility of this faculty-led effort and to our dedication to learn from diverse settings around the US and beyond its borders as a means to develop the strongest professional preparation in education,” stated Jill A. Perry, the Executive Director.

The vision of the Consortium is to transform the EdD (referred to as a Professional Practice Doctorate within the Consortium) into the degree of choice for preparing the next generation of practitioner experts and school (K-12) college leaders in Education, especially those who will generate new knowledge and scholarship about educational practice (or related policies) and will have responsibility for stewarding the Education profession.  

This vision aligns with Fielding’s academic quality and innovation strategic objective about aligning existing degree programs with current market trends and demands of the profession and needs of society.

This initiative was led by Mario Borunda, EdD, Fielding's interim provost, along with Fielding faculty members Nicola Smith, MDA, JD, Kathy Tiner, PhD, and Anna DiStefano, EdDPresident Rogers stated, “They are to be commended for achieving this goal, which puts Fielding squarely into a national conversation on the future of education doctorates.”

About the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate (CPED)

The Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate (CPED) is a Consortium of colleges and schools of education, which have committed resources to work together to undertake a critical examination of the doctorate in education (EdD) through dialog, experimentation, critical feedback and evaluation.

The vision of the Consortium is to transform the EdD (referred to as a Professional Practice Doctorate within the Consortium) into the degree of choice for preparing the next generation of practitioner experts and school (K-12) college leaders in Education, especially those who will generate new knowledge and scholarship about educational practice (or related policies) and will have responsibility for stewarding the Education profession.

To accomplish this vision, the mission of the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate (CPED) is to improve the way in which professional educators are prepared by redesigning all aspects of EdD programs including: curriculum, assessments, admissions, etc. The CPED initiative currently has its headquarters at the School of Education at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, PA.

CONTACT:

Jill A. Perry, PhD, Executive Director   

Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate

(c) 301.204.2644 (o) 412.396.4341

jillaperry@cpedinitiative.org    http://CPEDinitiative.org

Tags: EdD, Education Doctorate, educational leadership, fielding graduate university, graduate education, Carnegie Project