Fielding Graduate University News

Fielding's Media Psychology Program Leaves an Impression on Digital Hollywood

Posted by Hilary Molina on Wed, Nov 04, 2015
 by Tunisha Singleton, MA - Current PhD Student | Fielding Graduate University | Co-Chair - APA Div 46 Student Committee |  Member - APA Div 46, 47 |


Fielding Graduate University made their presence felt at Digital Hollywood in Marina Del Rey, California. Digital Hollywood is a reputable conference in the convergence of entertainment and technology, bringing together the field’s top executives and developers. As a sponsor of the four-day summit, Fielding Graduate University’s Media Psychology program supportively added to the event by bringing fresh perspectives and specialists in cutting-edge fields.

digital_hollywood_hogg_and_rutledge.jpgDigital Hollywood is among the world’s best venues combining technology research and design. The setting became a perfect fit for media psychology’s scholar-practitioner model that aims to understand the psychological impact of media use and creation. Over 25 members of Fielding's media psychology community were present, including prospective and current students, alumni, and faculty.

Director of the Media Psychology PhD Program Jerri Lynn Hogg, PhD, was in attendance and noted that the overall experience was beneficial for both parties. “Patterns in media and new technology emerged in many of the panel discussions,” said Dr. Hogg. “While industry experts work to figure out how to use content and make new platforms, researchers from our program can provide this type of information by explaining the psychology behind it. So it was very energizing to connect industry developers with researchers.”

Digital Hollywood is broken up into multiple tracks emphasizing a particular area within entertainment and technology. A few tracks, for example, include: “Immersive Entertainment: From Movie Theatres to Interactive Surfaces," “The Women’s Summit & Festival: Content, Discussion, & Recognition,” and “Virtual and Augmented Reality: From Sense of Presence to Full Embodiment.” Panels are designed to focus on a specific topic under each theme with speakers who have exceled in that particular field. And representatives from Media Psychology were not only in attendance, but were also called to lead as pioneering examples.

Director of the Media Psychology Masters and Certificate Program, Garry Hare, PhD, moderated a panel titled “AR – VR and the Human Brain: The Impact of Neuromarketing on the Real-Time Design of Immersive Entertainment and Advertising Productions.” Exploring the cognitive science behind the visualization of complex data offered opportunities to showcase the innovative work of Media Psychology graduates.

“Students and faculty experience first hand innovations in immersive media, augmented reality and the future of both mass market and targeted productions,” said Dr. Hare. “Presentations by faculty on media neuroscience and the creation of AR applications were extremely well received, opening the door for future featured panels, presentations, Dr._Christophe_Morin.jpgreal-time research and collaborative product development.”

Leading the way on marketing neuroscience is Fielidng media psychology faculty member Christophe Morin, PhD, whose presentation was filled with stimulating and cutting-edge information that rang new to Digital Hollywood. As CEO of neuromarking agency SalesBrain, Dr. Morin believes that the psychology of neuromarketing is indispensable to the Digital Hollywood community. “The field of neuromarketing offers research methods that measure and predict the effect of media on our nervous system” said Dr. Morin. “I was pleased to see that content producers and marketers are very interested in the field of media neuroscience because our research can explain and predict the effect of advertising, games, and even movies on the brain.”

Interest in neuromarketing and other critical areas were expressed through the consistent flow of attention received at Fielding’s interactive information booth. Maintained over the course of the entire conference, faculty and alumni were able to showcase Fielding’s Media Psychology’s new certificate program with two new specialized concentrations - Media Neuroscience or Brand Psychology and Audience Engagement. Under each specialized focus, the three-course certificate allows industry professionals to gain an understanding of the "why" and "how" behind their work by applying psychological theory.

Fielding media psychology faculty member and Director of the Media Psychology Research Center Pamela Rutledge, PhD, spent several hours interacting with Digital Hollywood’s advertising and creative professionals about the new emphasis of Brand Psychology. “This certificate is designed to help you connect with the consumer and take advantage of the socially-connected, 24/7 world we live in,” said Dr. Rutledge. “Entertainment and technology is not just about the’s about human behavior. Media environments change. New technologies emerge. But human needs and goals do not. So here you’ll learn to apply psychology to develop and deliver a brand identity and core story that captures your audience’s wants.”

For the Fielding to sponsor Digital Hollywood, several positive outcomes can arise including careers for alumni, research projects for faculty and internships for current students. Third year media psychology doctorl student Matthew Price remarked on how significant it is for Fielding to be present at these events and how valuable it was to be in attendance, “Digital Hollywood was a terrific opportunity for me to network with industry luminaries and examine my place academically and professionally in a real world setting. I think this is one of the truest benefits of an education from Fielding; exposure to the industry and an opportunity to apply our education in a constructive environment."

The Fielding community received an overall enthusiastic reception from Digital Hollywood participants with high anticipation for returning to the next seasonal event. Taking advantage of the high profile opportunity provided by Digital Hollywood’s setting, faculty and alum showcased their unique approach to methodology, production research, and content creation. Doctoral, masters, and certificate programs alike - the Media Psychology program represented Fielding Graduate University well as a formidable leader in higher education, research, and applied innovation.




Tags: Media psychology, technology, psychology, fielding faculty, social media, digital learning, Distributed education, fielding graduate university, distance education, APA Div 46, PhD

In Memory of Fielding Leader Frank Friedlander: A Mentor and Leader with Heart

Posted by Hilary Molina on Mon, Nov 02, 2015

Frank Friedlander

"Frank was a forthright, inquisitive, caring consultant, mentor and was one of my favorite humans...

We worked together for fifteen years jointly running consulting skills workshops every Winter and Summer Session, and invariably he would challenge and console our participants to do the best consulting that the situation allowed. Old fashioned problem solving and challenging his clients and their counselors/coaches was his marker, and he did it with warmth and sensitivity. I miss Frank - he was one of a kind and to me, the penultimate scholar/practitioner."

-Don Bushnell, PhD, Faculty Emeritus and Founding Dean and of the School of Human and Organizational Development, Fielding Graduate University

Frank Friedlander passed away on October 1, 2015 after a brief and relatively painless illness. He felt that he had had a long and rich life, and was quite accepting that it was about to end. He was 88 years old.

Frank was born in South Orange, New Jersey on September 22, 1927. He was always interested in people and why they did what they did. He graduated from Cornell University with a bachelor's degree in psychology in 1950 and went on to earn an MBA from the University of Texas in 1956. Frank then moved to Cleveland, Ohio, and went to Western Reserve University and earned his PhD in social and organizational psychology in 1962.

In 1954 he married Janet Mongan and they raised three children: Todd, Clare and Paul. The marriage ended in 1977. In 1996, he married Margaret Waters, who was his partner for the remainder of his life.

After leaving Western Reserve University with his PhD, Frank began his organization development career. In 1962 the family moved to China Lake, California where he worked at the Naval Ordnance Test Center. While there, he did research on how effective teams worked together.

In the fall of 1966, Frank and his family moved back to Cleveland, Ohio where he joined the faculty of the newly begun Organizational Behavior PhD program at Case Institute of Technology. It was the first program of its kind in the world. For the next 15 years, he taught, consulted, wrote and worked with students on their PhD dissertations. The organizational behavior program was unique at the time in that the students and faculty were considered colleagues - there was not hierarchy of faculty having all of the answers and students being in a constant learning mode - they were all equal colleagues in a rich learning environment. Frank fit in very well in this role because of his values around respect, encouragement, and striving for colleagueship with his fellow faculty and the students with whom he came in contact. He "walked the talk" and was a profound role model for many in the University and his clients.

In 1981, Frank left what is now Case Western Reserve University (the two universities joined in 1968) to join the faculty at the Fielding Graduate University in Santa Barbara, California, where he continued his work as an outstanding faculty member working with students from around the world. During his tenure at Fielding, Frank conducted frequent seminars on organizational development, and consulted in collaboration with Fielding doctoral students who served as "shadow consultants" with nonprofit organizations throughout the U.S. In 2005, Frank and Don Bushnell, PhD, the founding dean of the School of Organization Development, founded the Center for Study of Nonprofit Organizations which became the Institute for Social Innovation at Fielding. Throughout his twenty-five years as senior faculty, he guided the doctoral research initiatives and mentored thirty-five candidates for advanced study at Fielding.

During his teaching career, Frank also was an active member of the Organizational Development Network and was a frequent presenter at their annual conventions. He was also a member of the National Training Laboratories where he led groups of individuals to help them identify their strengths and areas of development as leaders and human beings.

In his later years, Frank was an active member of the Humanist Community and a founding member of the Ethical Culture Society of Silicon Valley in 2006, where he offered valuable organizational support. He led workshops and seminars, led board retreats, and mentored other founders. He was passionate about bringing "heart" into Humanism, which he felt tends towards the "heady." He often talked and wrote in the last few years about how technology made us less connected instead of more connected, and how the loss of human contact in communication left the feelings out of our relationships, which he considered a big loss. Frank always valued and encouraged real and significant interactions with those around him.

Frank made many intellectual and academic contributions over the course of a long and illustrious career. For many years he was a national leader in the study of organizations and in the field of Organization Development. Within HOD he helped develop the systems knowledge area and ran a long-standing and admired consulting skills workshop with founding dean Don Bushnell. His style was one of practical problem solving with a strong dose of challenge for his clients. He value planned agendas for meetings and workshops but successfully co-facilitated with those who had a more improvisational style. Frank was a master at simultaneously tending to content and group process. He was also a notably competitive tennis player.
Frank’s Fielding colleagues speak of his many helpful contributions to their personal and professional development. While his wisdom was highly valued, he sometimes questioned the quality of his own work as well as sought help from others. For example, while he offered guidance for fellow faculty members on how to run a doctoral committee or faculty meeting, he also would ask for advice on how to give feedback on problematic student writing. He was a mentor who always sought improvement. Because of his many talents others sought his endorsement. To quote one colleague, “Do you remember the way he would say, ‘YES!!' when he agreed with you? I do."
Frank was shy and introverted despite an often forthright and inquisitive style when in work role. A person of many facets, colleagues describe him as humble, gentle, kind, inclusive, and nourishing.  He managed to overcome his shyness in several ways including performing at national sessions as one of the HOD Spandex Dancers (you would have to witness it to understand). Frank Friedlander is most fondly remembered and dearly missed.
-Charles McClintock, PhD, School of Human and Organizational Development Professor and Dean Emeritus, Fielding Graduate University
Frank was one of those rare individuals, whether in conversation, over a meal, or in a formal seminar, left others mulling over a challenging idea and filled with the acknowledgement of having been heard. Over the years, I saw him push others--his students, colleagues, friends-- and me, to think more deeply, to pose more critical questions, and to reflect on our assumptions. Passionate about organization development and leadership, he advocated tirelessly for creating organizations that honor the development of the people who work within them. We miss him, but he is always with us at Fielding as he was committed to the way we think about learning and the way we work with our students.
-Katrina S. Rogers, PhD, President, Fielding Graduate University


If you would like to share any memories of Frank, please post them on Facebook>Frank Friedlander>public group, or e-mail


Tags: Organizational development, fielding graduate university, human development, PhD, Frank Friedlander, institute for social innovation, katrina rogers

Fielding Graduate University’s Worldwide Network For Gender Empowerment Granted Consultative Status To The United Nations

Posted by Hilary Molina on Sat, Oct 17, 2015

The Worldwide Network for Gender Empowerment (WNGE), a center within Fielding Graduate University, announced today that it was granted special consultative status to the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC).

Acting Chief for the Office of ECOSOC Support and Coordination Alberto Padova wrote, “I am pleased to inform you that the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) at its coordination and management meeting adopted the recommendation of the Committee on Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) to grant special consultative status to your organization. On behalf of all staff of the Non-Governmental Organizations Branch/OESC/DESA, please accept our heartfelt congratulations.”

WNGE, a global organization focused on scholar-activism impacting women’s and gender issues, has been a recognized and registered nongovernmental (NGO) with the United Nations Department of Public Information (DPI) since 2009. This special consultative status elevates WNGE into an elite circle of NGOs working directly with the functional commissions.

ECOSOC status for an organization enables it to actively engage with the United Nations Secretariat, programs, funds and agencies. These activities include:

  • Placement of items of special interest in the provisional agenda of the Council
  • Attendance at meetings and access to the United Nations offices in New York, Geneva and Vienna
  • Submission and circulation of written statements
  • Oral presentations at ECOSOC
  • Consultations with ECOSOC and its subsidiary bodies

“We are extremely pleased to have been granted special consultative status to the UN,” stated Director for WNGE Anna DiStefano, EdD. “This provides us the opportunity to more fully engage in our global advocacy and policy work focused on gender empowerment and equity.”

Fielding Graduate University President Katrina Rogers added, “We are very proud of the accomplishments of WNGE and the recognition the organization has received on the global stage. WNGE is a great example of Fielding’s focus on scholar-activism, social justice and leadership.”

Worldwide Network for Gender Empowerment (WNGE) is an engaged and diverse ecosystem comprised of global members committed to research, collaboration, and action in support of women’s and gender issues. WNGE is focused on impacting change with cross-cutting measures in sectors including education, health care, environment, violence prevention, equality, and globalization.



Tags: globalization, EdD, women's issues, leadership, fielding graduate university, human rights, katrina rogers

Fielding's New Media Psychology Program Director Jerri Lynn Hogg, PhD On Media Psychology and Technology for Good

Posted by Hilary Molina on Wed, Oct 14, 2015

As president of the American Psychological Association’s Division 46-Society for Media Psychology and Technology, Jerri Lynn Hogg, PhD, now takes on the role as program director of media psychology at Fielding Graduate University.

Jerri Lynn HoggDr. Hogg stepped right into her new role with ease. Coming from years of grounded experience in both academic and professional settings, her teaching experience at a variety of post-secondary organizations, along with her numerous years of involvement in the media psychology program at Fielding, Dr. Hogg is poised and ready to drive media psychology further into the educational forefront of the 21st century. Dr. Hogg's vision of the future of media psychology as a disciple was clearly outlined during her interview for the position of director:

The future of media psychology is impacted by the psychological foundations which form the building blocks of this discipline. These building blocks are what separate us from big media studies departments and other educational areas that hover in the same research space as media psychology. Media psychology is a broad umbrella-based psychology that is grounded in psychology, and also engages theories and research from a variety of other fields that study media and technology.

At Fielding, I believe that we are at a place where we have the opportunity to do something special, to influence peoples’ lives in important and meaningful ways. From understanding how mobile applications can best be used to encourage fitness, or stimulate happiness and mental well-being to create powerful advocacy campaigns and disaster relief efforts, such as the one most recently implemented by the Red Cross app that facilitated donations for the relief efforts in Nepal; we can learn about, demonstrate and research, how emergent technologies are enhancing our lives in powerful ways. By studying the psychological components engaged when we connect with media and technology we can inform better design and application.

For example, we can apply theory to emergent technologies to create and further define dynamic learning environments, use augmented and virtual reality to find new ways to understand and view the world, create delivery models that are media rich in presence, yet can cross geographical and time boundaries, and we can construct media that facilitates socially responsible advocacy for the betterment of humanity. With the ability to connect in more meaningful ways, collaborate cross-boundaries and cultures, share knowledge by making information more readily available and understandable, media psychology is a force for motivation, well-being, and good.

In her newest role as program director, Dr. Hogg continues to affirm the direction she sees the program going and why Fielding is the place for this vision. "It is my goal to continue to foster an energetic research center in media psychology which includes a collaborative learning space and a think-tank environment that provides businesses, organizations, nonprofits, and foundations a place to seek advice, consult, and research the intersection of human behavior and media and technology," stated Dr. Hogg. "My vision for the media psychology program within Fielding is to continue to establish the culture and identity of the program with administration, admissions and marketing, and the university in general, so we can best advertise, promote and attract students who are interested in media psychology...We are best aligned for positive outcomes, and impact, that includes strong student learning and ground breaking research, when there is a good fit. It is the story, the vision, and the cohesive message that allows not only the potential to understand who we are, but creates the vision of what we commit to as a program, a program that embraces the breadth of the field of media psychology in a foundational manner and offers specializations as our core niche. Current proposed certificates in neuroscience, brand psychology, and immersive media are a good start in this direction."

One of Dr. Hogg's areas of interest as a media psychologist is to look at virtual and augmented environments to see how people can bring a sense of presence to these environments - to make it feel as real as when we share physical presence. She frequently speaks on psychological components and influences of media and technology on human behavior and she continues to uncover new areas for research and understanding.

Dr. Hogg began her career studying engineering and then made the unusual jump to journalism and communications. While it might not have made sense at the time to make this transition, it fueled her interest in the science and the technology behind how people are driven to connect and communicate. To this day, she continues to examine a variety of interests, which are primarily based around how media influences people's lives, relationships, and humans make meaning out of life in a highly digitized world. Her passion continues to remain in the ways people connect and make meaning in digital environments. As Dr. Hogg continues her studies as a researcher and as a graduate of the media psychology program at Fielding, she would like to give back to her university and the field she proudly represents.

Tags: Media psychology, APA, psychology, fielding faculty, social media, leadership, clinical psychology, fielding graduate university, graduate education, scholar practitioner

Fielding Alumna and Former Trustee Larraine Matusak, PhD, Receives ILA’s Lifetime Achievement Award

Posted by Hilary Molina on Tue, Oct 13, 2015

larraine matusak.jpgOne of Fielding Graduate University’s first students to graduate in 1975 and former Fielding board member, Larraine Matusak, PhD, is one of this year’s ILA's Lifetime Achievement Award honorees.

In 1974, Dr. Matusak’s dissertation, Evaluation of the Alternative Degree Programs of the General College of the University of Minnesota, was written under the direction of doctoral mentor, Charles W. Brydon, along with oral committee chair, Fielding founder Frederic M. Hudson.

Dr. Matusak has had a profound impact on people's lives around the world serving as a speaker, author, university president, and international leadership expert. She founded the College of Alternative Programs at the University of Evansville and, as one of the original board members of the Council for Adult Experiential Learning, promoted innovative concepts and trained thousands. Perhaps her biggest achievements were in the work she did at the W.K. Kellogg Foundation where she led international grant-making efforts and helped fund a generation of leadership programs worldwide. As Matusak is fond of saying, "Create the future! Leadership is everyone's responsibility." Her book, Finding Your Voice: Learning to Lead… Anywhere You Want to Make a Difference does just that, focusing on growing leadership in every individual. Her belief in individual acts of leadership led to the establishment of the Matusak Courageous Leadership Award, given by the Kellogg Fellows Leadership Alliance. The award recognizes individuals who have courageously and authentically spoke up when silence meant colluding with the problem. Roger Sublett, a former colleague at Kellogg and ILA board member, sums up her contributions well, "Wherever Dr. Matusak has served as a leader in higher education or philanthropy she has transformed organizations and people."

ILA_logoThe International Leadership Association (ILA) is the global network for all those who practice, study, and teach leadership. As part of the 10th Anniversary celebration in 2008, ILA began work on a new project that carries into both the future of the ILA and the future of leadership studies: The Leadership Legacy Project. The ILA inducts individuals from the field of leadership studies into the Legacy Project by presenting them with ILA's Lifetime Achievement Award at their annual global conference held in Barcelona, Spain in October 2016. Honorees are selected based on their significant and diverse contributions to the field of leadership.

Fielding Graduate University President Katrina Rogers, PhD, reflected, “Dr. Matusak exemplifies the vision of Fielding’s founder, Dr. Frederic Hudson, who argued that all of us could and would be called to leadership at some point in our lives. In this work, we as human beings need to be ready to engage in the world with forethought, wisdom, and scholarly knowledge. It is a pleasure to see her lifetime work honored in this way.”

Content reprinted and photo used with permission from ILA.

For more information about the ILA, please visit:

Tags: leadership, higher education, fielding graduate university, ILA, Frederic Hudson, katrina rogers

Fielding Signs Partnership Agreement With the University of the Virgin Islands

Posted by Hilary Molina on Wed, Aug 19, 2015

Fielding Graduate University is partnering with the University of the Virgin Islands (UVI) who also reached agreements with the University of St. Maarten, Philipsburg, St. Maarten; the Council of Community Colleges of Jamaica, Kingston, Jamaica; Nantong University, China; Yangzhou University, China; and the University of Nebraska at Omaha.

UVI MOU Fielding


Photo courtesy of University of the Virgin Islands

Back row left to right: Dr. Orlando Taylor, Fielding VP of Strategic Initiatives; Dr. Linda Thomas, UVI Dean, School of Education; Dr. James S. Maddirala, UVI Associate Provost for Graduate, Global and Academic Affairs; Dr. Stephen Reames, UVI Dean, School of Business; Dr. Dorothy Agger-Gupta, Program Director, Fielding School of Human & Organizational Development ; Dr. Habtes Yegin, UVI Professor of Education. Front row left to right: Dr. Camille McKayle, UVI Provost; Dr. David Hall, UVI President ; Dr. Katrina Rogers, Fielding President; Dr. Linda Honold, Chair, Fielding Board of Trustees.

Each of the agreements, known as memoranda of understanding (MOU), are unique and share a spirit of cooperation and understanding. UVI’s MOU with Fielding is intended to establish mutually beneficial collaborations in academic programs, research, the pursuit of grants, continuing education, and certificate programs. “The common goal of the MOUs is to enhance the UVI experience, either by having students from other parts of the world in the classroom here at UVI or by having UVI students sit in the classrooms around the world,” said UVI Provost Dr. Camille McKayle, “A 21st Century education needs to be a global education. UVI graduates will find themselves in work environments with people from around the world, actually and virtually. UVI aims to prepare them for that environment by giving them opportunities to see that world so that it is a less daunting place.”

The general objective of the agreement with Fielding is to engage in long-term collaboration in fields that are compatible with the orientation and expertise of each institution. The MOU provides for possible collaborations involving a PhD collaborative program in leadership with agreed upon credits transferable from one institution to the other. This collaboration will target, though not exclusively, Fielding’s Schools of Human and Organizational Development and School of Education Leadership for Change. Students will be able to study several concentrations including, academic leadership, political leadership, ecological justice leadership and health leadership.

According to the MOU other possible collaborations include:

  • Joint courtesy/adjunct faculty appointments to support PhD degree programs at each institution
  • Faculty exchanges
  • Continuing education opportunities on selected topics
  • Faculty development in competency based education and/or prior learning assessments
  • Faculty development and technical support in instructional design
  • Joint research activity in areas of mutual interest and expertise
  • Joint applications for external grants in areas of mutual interest and expertise
  • Possible establishment of a formal center or institute on leadership and diversity to house Fielding/UVI activity possibly in conjunction with Fielding’s Institute for Social Innovation or Fielding’s new Marie Fielder Center on Democracy, Leadership and Education.
  • Joint marketing and student recruitment domestically and internationally
  • Periodic Fielding residencies in the Virgin Islands; UVI residencies in Santa Barbara, CA

The MOU is for three years with an automatic renewal unless terminated.

Fielding Graduate University President Katrina Rogers, PhD stated, “We are honored to be working with the University of Virgin Islands to support our mutual goals to develop leadership across the globe for the complex, often difficult conditions, our graduates will face over the course of their careers.  We look forward to many years of a partnership to create effective educational offerings for students that assist them in attaining their professional goals and provide skills and knowledge for their lifetime.”

Tags: globalization, educational leadership, Organizational development, fielding faculty, Competency Based Education, Distributed education, fielding graduate university, graduate education, human development, institue for social innovation, scholar practitioner

Steven A. Schapiro, EdD, Named Interim Dean

Posted by Hilary Molina on Fri, Aug 07, 2015

Steve_Schapiro5479Fielding Graduate University is pleased to announce the appointment of Steven A. Schapiro, EdD, as the interim dean of academic affairs. This position will play an important role in developing and implementing a new Fielding vision as well as insuring the integrity of its academic programs as the university undergoes significant re-structuring. “I am excited to take on this new position in order to help Fielding maintain and strengthen our leadership role in providing a progressive and truly student-centered approach to graduate education,” Schapiro stated. “In the challenging and competitive educational landscape in which we find ourselves, we have much to teach the higher education community about how to implement individualized, experiential, and competency-based learning. Our approach is not tied to “seat time” or an overly standardized curriculum, but to inquiry and authentic learning in response to individual and societal needs. At the same time, I believe that we can learn from other progressive and learner-centered institutions about doing critical and emancipatory teaching, creating collaborative learning communities in cyber-space, and responding to the needs of the tech savvy and increasingly diverse students of today.”

The new dean will eventually assume the role of accreditation liaison officer (ALO) and guide the faculty in the program review process among many other essential responsibilities. “As our new ALO,” Schapiro reflected, “I will be drawing on my experience in this role at one of our sister institutions, Goddard College. I see my role of ALO as serving as a bridge and translator between us and our accrediting agency, WASC; helping WASC to understand and appreciate the unique dimensions of our learning model and forms of authentic and performance based assessment, and helping us to understand and respond to WASC’s call for clarity about what outcomes we expect from our students’ learning experiences, how we assess that learning, and how we use that knowledge to improve our practices.”

Dr. Schapiro has enjoyed a distinguished career in higher education. He received his EdD in psychological education from the University of Massachusetts, an MAT in social studies from the Graduate School of Education at Harvard University, and a BA Magna Cum Laude in American studies from Yale University. His preparation for administration was strengthened by attendance at Harvard’s Institute for Educational Management. He has authored books, book chapters, and journal articles, and given over 50 scholarly presentations. Dr. Schapiro has served as a faculty member in Fielding’s School of Human & Organizational Development since 2000, and as the Malcolm Knowles Chair in Adult Learning since 2013. He has most recently served as senior co-chair of the Academic Senate Leadership Committee. His previous administrative work included dean for academic affairs at Goddard College where he also served as director of teacher education and special assistant to the president for Institutional Research and Planning. Dr. Schapiro will serve in the role of interim dean for the next two years before a national search is conducted.

Tags: EdD, fielding faculty, leadership, higher education, fielding graduate university, graduate education, education

Fielding Awards Honorary Degree to Michael B. Goldstein, JD

Posted by Hilary Molina on Mon, Aug 03, 2015

Convocation 2015 8541 mike and katrina resized 600On July 19, 2015, Fielding Graduate University President Katrina Rogers, PhD, conferred the honorary doctorate of humane letters on Michael B. Goldstein, JD, co-chair of the Higher Education practice of Cooley LLP. In awarding this distinction, Dr. Goldstein joined other honorees including globally-known educator Paolo Friere, civil rights activist Marie Fielder, renowned psychologist Bob Goulding, LGBTQ advocate Lynn Lukow and inspired educator Eddie Seashore.

During the hooding and conferral of the degree, President Rogers reflected on Dr. Goldstein’s accomplishments, “He is a pioneer in the development of the legal environment in higher education, a counselor at the highest levels of legislation, a leader in championing creative approaches to higher education and an advocate of the highest ideals of learning as a means towards a more just and sustainable future for humanity.”

Following the conferral, Dr.Goldstein delivered the commencement address to the Fielding Summer Session 2015 graduates titled “The Importance of Timing and Convergence: Learning to Love Competency Based Learning.” In his remarks, Dr. Goldstein pointed to the barriers to learning based not on time-in-seat but demonstrated competencies, proposing the creation of what he termed a “super-accreditor specifically for the purpose of reviewing and evaluating non-time-based approaches to teaching, learning and documenting competencies.”

Dr. Goldstein served a total of 23 years as a Fielding trustee, including as itsMike GoldsteinConvocation 2015 8575 resized 600 chair, before retiring from the board in 2015. In 2012, the board created the Michael B. Goldstein Endowed Board Scholarship for Dissertation Research Advancing Social Justice, in recognition of his longtime service as a trustee and distinguished leader. This scholarship supports research by Fielding doctoral candidates on topics that further the achievement of a specific aspect of social justice. President Rogers appointed Dr. Goldstein as co-chair of Fielding’s newly organized President’s Advisory Council.

Dr. Goldstein is the founder and headed the education practice at Dow Lohnes, which merged with Cooley in 2014. Dr. Goldstein is a pioneer in the development and rational regulation of online, competency based, and other nontraditional modes of learning, including the creation of innovative approaches to combining the resources of the nonprofit, public, and for-profit sectors to improve access to quality higher education. He is the 2014 recipient of WCET’s Richard Jonsen Award for leadership in e-learning and is widely recognized for his distinguished service to many higher educational organizations.

Before entering private law practice, Dr. Goldstein was Associate Vice Chancellor for Urban and Governmental Affairs and Associate Professor of Urban Sciences at the University of Illinois-Chicago. Prior to that, he was an Assistant City Administrator and the Director Of University Relations for New York City. Dr. Goldstein holds a BA from Cornell University, a JD from New York University and was a Loeb Fellow at the Graduate School of Design, Harvard University.

Tags: social justice, educational leadership, conference, Competency Based Education, leadership, Distributed education, national session, higher education, fielding graduate university, graduate education, scholar activist, scholar practitioner

Policing Black and Brown Communities: Dynamics of Race, Class and Gender

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Wed, Jul 15, 2015

Policing Black and Brown Communities: A Discussion about Dynamics of Race, Class and Gender

SS15_Ed_Series_graphic-policeIn the current national conversation about police activity and brutality, especially in low income neighborhoods of people of color, we recognize that there are intersecting issues of racial classification, economic class, as well as gender and gender expression at work on our streets. Through a panel of local experts and activists on various aspects of this situation, along with Fielding Graduate University faculty, a discussion titled Policing Black and Brown Communities: Dynamics of Race, Class and Gender will focus on the debate over the right-wrong, police-citizen, for police-against police debates to a deeper analysis. Understanding the historical relationships between identified groups (eg. racially, economically, gender-based) and law enforcement in this country can help us more clearly identify paths of action to promote social justice for all peoples, rather than demonizing them based on categorical status.

As part of its National Summer Session in Rosemont, IL, Fielding Graduate University invites the extended Chicago community to this educational discussion tonight, Wednesday, July 15, 2015 from 7–9 pm at the Westin O’Hare in Rosemont, IL. This event is free and open to the public.


Monique W. Morris, EdD

monique-1Morris is an author and social justice scholar with more than 20 years of professional and volunteer experience in the areas of education, civil rights, juvenile and social justice.  Dr. Morris is the author of Black Stats: African Americans by the Numbers in the Twenty-First Century (The New Press, 2014), Too Beautiful for Words (MWM Books, 2012); and Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools (The New Press, 2016), a forthcoming book on the criminalization of Black girls in schools. She has written dozens of articles, book chapters, and other publications on social justice issues and lectured widely on research, policies, and practices associated with improving juvenile justice, educational, and socioeconomic conditions for Black girls, women, and their families.

Morris is co-founder of The National Black Women’s Justice Institute; a lecturer for Saint Mary’s College of California and an adjunct professor for the University of San Francisco. She is a 2012 Soros Justice Fellow, the former vice president for Economic Programs, Advocacy and Research at the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and the former director of Research for the Thelton E. Henderson Center for Social Justice at the UC Berkeley Law School. Morris has also worked in partnership with and served as a consultant for state and county agencies, national academic and research institutions, and communities throughout the nation to develop comprehensive approaches and training curricula to eliminate racial/ethnic and gender disparities in the justice system. Her work in this area has informed the development and implementation of improved culturally competent and gender-responsive continua of services for youth.

Morris’ research intersects race, gender, education and justice to explore the ways in which Black communities, and other communities of color, are uniquely affected by social policies. Among other publications, Morris is the author of "Representing the Educational Experiences of Black Girls in a Juvenile Court School" (Journal of Applied Research on Children, 2014); "Sacred Inquiry and Delinquent Black Girls: Developing a Foundation for a Liberative Pedagogical Praxis" (In Understanding Work Experiences from Multiple Perspectives, edited by G.D. Sardana and Tojo Thatchenkery, 2014); Educating the Caged Bird: Black Girls and the Juvenile Court School (Poverty & Race, PRRAC, 2013) and Race, Gender and the School to Prison Pipeline: Expanding Our Discussion to Include Black Girls (African American Policy Forum, 2012). Her 2008 study, A Higher Hurdle: Barriers to Employment for Formerly Incarcerated Women (UC Berkeley School of Law), which is one of the first testing studies to examine the impact of a criminal record or period of incarceration on the employment outcomes of women, was referenced in a special report commissioned by Congressman Danny K. Davis (D-IL).

Morris is a member of the OJJDP National Girls Institute Expert Panel and the California Board of State and Community Corrections’ Committee on Reducing Racial and Ethnic Disparity. She is also an advisory board member for Global Girl Media, Oakland and regular contributor to

Chairty Tolliver

Tolliver is the Founder and Project Director of Black on Both Sides. A seasoned and nationally recognized youth development specialist, Tolliver grew up in the Englewood neighborhood of Chicago. She is a foster mother, writer, and spoken word artist, and former director of one of the largest and oldest organizing groups in Chicago, Southwest Youth Collaborative. In over thirteen years in the field of Youth Development, she has worked on campaigns on a broad range of issues, including fair housing, labor rights, school reform, prison reform, and LGBT youth rights. In 2012 she was selected as one of seven activists nationwide to receive the Alston Bannerman Fellowship, and is a 2013 George Soros Senior Justice Fellow. Charity identifies as a Black woman and mother, and uses feminine pronouns. She is not youth-identified, although the UN Declaration on the Rights of Youth might disagree.

Chacyln Hunt

Hunt is an attorney and police misconduct organizer in Chicago and works with youth of color and their experiences with police. Her project integrates civil rights education with research and legal strategy driven by the kids' everyday experiences with law enforcement. The students she works with participate in role plays and produce interviews with their classmates. We (a group of professionals) spend months with the kids learning from them, and helping them gain a critical distance from their experiences in order to advocate for police accountability.             

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Tags: gender empowerment, EdD, Education Doctorate, diversity, organizational change, conversation, leadership, adult learning, national session, fielding graduate university, human rights, criminal justice

President of The Chicago School of Professional Psychology (TCSPP) Patricia Arredondo, EdD, to Discuss Latina Feminism

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Tue, Jul 14, 2015

President of The Chicago School of Professional Psychology (TCSPP) Patricia Arredondo, EdD, to Discuss Latina Feminism at the Fielding Educational Series in Rosemont, IL

Latinas in the U.S. are in the process of claiming their power through higher education while navigating cultural divides in personal and professional relationships and in other social contexts.

SS15_Ed_Series_graphic-heart_ArredondoOn Wednesday, July 15, 2015 from 4–6 pm at the Westin O’Hare in Rosemont, IL , the President of The Chicago School of Professional Psychology (TCSPP) Patricia Arredondo, EdD will discuss how Latina feminism influences peoples relationship-oriented cultural worldview and sense of fairness and social justice. As part of its National Summer Session in Rosemont, IL, Fielding Graduate University invites the extended Chicago community to join this educational presentation sponsored by Fielding’s Worldwide Network for Gender Empowerment, titled Leading from the Heart and Cultural Roots. This event is free and open to the public.                                                                                  

Latina feminism is influenced by our relationship-oriented cultural worldview and sense of fairness and social justice. This feminist framework is rooted in historic events that place a value on education, community engagement, and compassion. Latinas in the U.S. are in the process of claiming their power through higher education while navigating cultural divides in personal and professional relationships and in other social contexts. Dr. Arredondo will present concepts and models, often invisible to Latinas themselves that contribute to our sense of identity and empowerment.

About Patricia Arredondo, EdD

Arredondo_Commencement_PhotoPatricia Arredondo, EdD, became president of Chicago campus of The Chicago School of Professional Psychology (TCSPP) in February 2013. She joined the school after successfully serving in senior administrative roles with the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and Arizona State University. Additionally, she led an organizational consulting firm addressing diversity in the workplace in Boston for 13 years. As of June 2015, she has assumed a new position with TCSPP as Senior Advisor for Institutional Initiatives.

In the academic world, Arredondo is a national leader and scholar on many fronts, extensively published in the areas of multicultural competency development, immigrant issues in counseling, counseling with Latinas/os, women’s leadership and, organizational diversity. She has authored more than 100 referred journal articles, book chapters, and training videos and is regularly invited for keynote addresses nationally and internationally. Her latest book, Culturally Responsive Counseling for Latinas/os was published in 2014 by the American Counseling Association (ACA) Press. Currently, Arredondo is also co-principal Investigator on a three-year training grant from the National Science Foundation that advances women of color in the STEM fields to administrative opportunities at Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Tribal Colleges. She considers herself a social justice advocate and an educator at heart.

Civic and professional organization leadership is visible throughout Arredondo’s career. She served as president of four national associations, among these was the American Counseling Association (ACA), the largest counseling association in the world. She is the only Latina to serve in that position. Arredondo was also president of the American Psychological Association Division 45 - Society for the Psychological Study of Ethnic Minority Issues, the Association of Multicultural Counseling and Development of the ACA and the founding president of the National Latina/o Psychological. In the civic arena, Arredondo has always been active in community activities. Among her leadership roles were president of the Board of Family and Children’s Services in Boston, on the board of the Diversity Leadership Committee for the City of Phoenix, Vice-Chair of the Social Development Commission for Milwaukee County, the largest anti-poverty organization in Wisconsin, and more recently she was appointed to the Advisory Board for DiversityMBA Magazine in Chicago. She chairs the Board of Professional Affairs for the American Psychological Association.

Arredondo has been the recipient of many awards and recognitions throughout her career. Many of these awards acknowledge her as a “pioneer” or change agent in her profession. She is the 2013 recipient of the prestigious Henry Tomes Award for Distinguished Lifetime Contributions to the Advancement of Ethnic Minority Psychology, the “Living Legend” award from the ACA, the Lifetime Achievement Award from APA Division 45, the Madrina Award by the National Latina/o Psychological Association, and an honorary degree from the University of San Diego; she also holds Fellow status with the American Counseling and American Psychological Associations. She enjoys promoting women’s leadership, mentoring graduate students, emerging professionals, entrepreneurs, and individuals who want to make a difference on behalf of others.

Arredondo holds degrees from Kent State University, Boston College, and Boston University. She is a licensed psychologist and bilingual in English and Spanish. Arredondo is extremely proud of her Mexican American heritage. Arredondo is family-centered and enjoys her extended family engagements across the country.

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Tags: EdD, social justice, educational leadership, diversity, sociology, leadership, adult learning, fielding graduate university, human rights, learning