Fielding Graduate University News

Fielding Signs Partnership Agreement With the University of the Virgin Islands

Posted by Hilary Molina on Wed, Aug 19, 2015

Fielding Graduate University is partnering with the University of the Virgin Islands (UVI) who also reached agreements with the University of St. Maarten, Philipsburg, St. Maarten; the Council of Community Colleges of Jamaica, Kingston, Jamaica; Nantong University, China; Yangzhou University, China; and the University of Nebraska at Omaha.

UVI MOU Fielding

 

Photo courtesy of University of the Virgin Islands

Back row left to right: Dr. Orlando Taylor, Fielding VP of Strategic Initiatives; Dr. Linda Thomas, UVI Dean, School of Education; Dr. James S. Maddirala, UVI Associate Provost for Graduate, Global and Academic Affairs; Dr. Stephen Reames, UVI Dean, School of Business; Dr. Dorothy Agger-Gupta, Program Director, Fielding School of Human & Organizational Development ; Dr. Habtes Yegin, UVI Professor of Education. Front row left to right: Dr. Camille McKayle, UVI Provost; Dr. David Hall, UVI President ; Dr. Katrina Rogers, Fielding President; Dr. Linda Honold, Chair, Fielding Board of Trustees.

Each of the agreements, known as memoranda of understanding (MOU), are unique and share a spirit of cooperation and understanding. UVI’s MOU with Fielding is intended to establish mutually beneficial collaborations in academic programs, research, the pursuit of grants, continuing education, and certificate programs. “The common goal of the MOUs is to enhance the UVI experience, either by having students from other parts of the world in the classroom here at UVI or by having UVI students sit in the classrooms around the world,” said UVI Provost Dr. Camille McKayle, “A 21st Century education needs to be a global education. UVI graduates will find themselves in work environments with people from around the world, actually and virtually. UVI aims to prepare them for that environment by giving them opportunities to see that world so that it is a less daunting place.”

The general objective of the agreement with Fielding is to engage in long-term collaboration in fields that are compatible with the orientation and expertise of each institution. The MOU provides for possible collaborations involving a PhD collaborative program in leadership with agreed upon credits transferable from one institution to the other. This collaboration will target, though not exclusively, Fielding’s Schools of Human and Organizational Development and School of Education Leadership for Change. Students will be able to study several concentrations including, academic leadership, political leadership, ecological justice leadership and health leadership.

According to the MOU other possible collaborations include:

  • Joint courtesy/adjunct faculty appointments to support PhD degree programs at each institution
  • Faculty exchanges
  • Continuing education opportunities on selected topics
  • Faculty development in competency based education and/or prior learning assessments
  • Faculty development and technical support in instructional design
  • Joint research activity in areas of mutual interest and expertise
  • Joint applications for external grants in areas of mutual interest and expertise
  • Possible establishment of a formal center or institute on leadership and diversity to house Fielding/UVI activity possibly in conjunction with Fielding’s Institute for Social Innovation or Fielding’s new Marie Fielder Center on Democracy, Leadership and Education.
  • Joint marketing and student recruitment domestically and internationally
  • Periodic Fielding residencies in the Virgin Islands; UVI residencies in Santa Barbara, CA

The MOU is for three years with an automatic renewal unless terminated.

Fielding Graduate University President Katrina Rogers, PhD stated, “We are honored to be working with the University of Virgin Islands to support our mutual goals to develop leadership across the globe for the complex, often difficult conditions, our graduates will face over the course of their careers.  We look forward to many years of a partnership to create effective educational offerings for students that assist them in attaining their professional goals and provide skills and knowledge for their lifetime.”

Tags: globalization, educational leadership, Organizational development, fielding faculty, Competency Based Education, Distributed education, fielding graduate university, graduate education, human development, institue for social innovation, scholar practitioner

Steven A. Schapiro, EdD, Named Interim Dean

Posted by Hilary Molina on Fri, Aug 07, 2015

Steve_Schapiro5479Fielding Graduate University is pleased to announce the appointment of Steven A. Schapiro, EdD, as the interim dean of academic affairs. This position will play an important role in developing and implementing a new Fielding vision as well as insuring the integrity of its academic programs as the university undergoes significant re-structuring. “I am excited to take on this new position in order to help Fielding maintain and strengthen our leadership role in providing a progressive and truly student-centered approach to graduate education,” Schapiro stated. “In the challenging and competitive educational landscape in which we find ourselves, we have much to teach the higher education community about how to implement individualized, experiential, and competency-based learning. Our approach is not tied to “seat time” or an overly standardized curriculum, but to inquiry and authentic learning in response to individual and societal needs. At the same time, I believe that we can learn from other progressive and learner-centered institutions about doing critical and emancipatory teaching, creating collaborative learning communities in cyber-space, and responding to the needs of the tech savvy and increasingly diverse students of today.”

The new dean will eventually assume the role of accreditation liaison officer (ALO) and guide the faculty in the program review process among many other essential responsibilities. “As our new ALO,” Schapiro reflected, “I will be drawing on my experience in this role at one of our sister institutions, Goddard College. I see my role of ALO as serving as a bridge and translator between us and our accrediting agency, WASC; helping WASC to understand and appreciate the unique dimensions of our learning model and forms of authentic and performance based assessment, and helping us to understand and respond to WASC’s call for clarity about what outcomes we expect from our students’ learning experiences, how we assess that learning, and how we use that knowledge to improve our practices.”

Dr. Schapiro has enjoyed a distinguished career in higher education. He received his EdD in psychological education from the University of Massachusetts, an MAT in social studies from the Graduate School of Education at Harvard University, and a BA Magna Cum Laude in American studies from Yale University. His preparation for administration was strengthened by attendance at Harvard’s Institute for Educational Management. He has authored books, book chapters, and journal articles, and given over 50 scholarly presentations. Dr. Schapiro has served as a faculty member in Fielding’s School of Human & Organizational Development since 2000, and as the Malcolm Knowles Chair in Adult Learning since 2013. He has most recently served as senior co-chair of the Academic Senate Leadership Committee. His previous administrative work included dean for academic affairs at Goddard College where he also served as director of teacher education and special assistant to the president for Institutional Research and Planning. Dr. Schapiro will serve in the role of interim dean for the next two years before a national search is conducted.

Tags: EdD, fielding faculty, leadership, higher education, fielding graduate university, graduate education, education

Fielding Awards Honorary Degree to Michael B. Goldstein, JD

Posted by Hilary Molina on Mon, Aug 03, 2015

Convocation 2015 8541 mike and katrina resized 600On July 19, 2015, Fielding Graduate University President Katrina Rogers, PhD, conferred the honorary doctorate of humane letters on Michael B. Goldstein, JD, co-chair of the Higher Education practice of Cooley LLP. In awarding this distinction, Dr. Goldstein joined other honorees including globally-known educator Paolo Friere, civil rights activist Marie Fielder, renowned psychologist Bob Goulding, LGBTQ advocate Lynn Lukow and inspired educator Eddie Seashore.

During the hooding and conferral of the degree, President Rogers reflected on Dr. Goldstein’s accomplishments, “He is a pioneer in the development of the legal environment in higher education, a counselor at the highest levels of legislation, a leader in championing creative approaches to higher education and an advocate of the highest ideals of learning as a means towards a more just and sustainable future for humanity.”

Following the conferral, Dr.Goldstein delivered the commencement address to the Fielding Summer Session 2015 graduates titled “The Importance of Timing and Convergence: Learning to Love Competency Based Learning.” In his remarks, Dr. Goldstein pointed to the barriers to learning based not on time-in-seat but demonstrated competencies, proposing the creation of what he termed a “super-accreditor specifically for the purpose of reviewing and evaluating non-time-based approaches to teaching, learning and documenting competencies.”

Dr. Goldstein served a total of 23 years as a Fielding trustee, including as itsMike GoldsteinConvocation 2015 8575 resized 600 chair, before retiring from the board in 2015. In 2012, the board created the Michael B. Goldstein Endowed Board Scholarship for Dissertation Research Advancing Social Justice, in recognition of his longtime service as a trustee and distinguished leader. This scholarship supports research by Fielding doctoral candidates on topics that further the achievement of a specific aspect of social justice. President Rogers appointed Dr. Goldstein as co-chair of Fielding’s newly organized President’s Advisory Council.

Dr. Goldstein is the founder and headed the education practice at Dow Lohnes, which merged with Cooley in 2014. Dr. Goldstein is a pioneer in the development and rational regulation of online, competency based, and other nontraditional modes of learning, including the creation of innovative approaches to combining the resources of the nonprofit, public, and for-profit sectors to improve access to quality higher education. He is the 2014 recipient of WCET’s Richard Jonsen Award for leadership in e-learning and is widely recognized for his distinguished service to many higher educational organizations.

Before entering private law practice, Dr. Goldstein was Associate Vice Chancellor for Urban and Governmental Affairs and Associate Professor of Urban Sciences at the University of Illinois-Chicago. Prior to that, he was an Assistant City Administrator and the Director Of University Relations for New York City. Dr. Goldstein holds a BA from Cornell University, a JD from New York University and was a Loeb Fellow at the Graduate School of Design, Harvard University.

Tags: social justice, educational leadership, conference, Competency Based Education, leadership, Distributed education, national session, higher education, fielding graduate university, graduate education, scholar activist, scholar practitioner

Policing Black and Brown Communities: Dynamics of Race, Class and Gender

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Wed, Jul 15, 2015

Policing Black and Brown Communities: A Discussion about Dynamics of Race, Class and Gender

SS15_Ed_Series_graphic-policeIn the current national conversation about police activity and brutality, especially in low income neighborhoods of people of color, we recognize that there are intersecting issues of racial classification, economic class, as well as gender and gender expression at work on our streets. Through a panel of local experts and activists on various aspects of this situation, along with Fielding Graduate University faculty, a discussion titled Policing Black and Brown Communities: Dynamics of Race, Class and Gender will focus on the debate over the right-wrong, police-citizen, for police-against police debates to a deeper analysis. Understanding the historical relationships between identified groups (eg. racially, economically, gender-based) and law enforcement in this country can help us more clearly identify paths of action to promote social justice for all peoples, rather than demonizing them based on categorical status.

As part of its National Summer Session in Rosemont, IL, Fielding Graduate University invites the extended Chicago community to this educational discussion tonight, Wednesday, July 15, 2015 from 7–9 pm at the Westin O’Hare in Rosemont, IL. This event is free and open to the public.

GUEST PANELISTS

Monique W. Morris, EdD

monique-1Morris is an author and social justice scholar with more than 20 years of professional and volunteer experience in the areas of education, civil rights, juvenile and social justice.  Dr. Morris is the author of Black Stats: African Americans by the Numbers in the Twenty-First Century (The New Press, 2014), Too Beautiful for Words (MWM Books, 2012); and Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools (The New Press, 2016), a forthcoming book on the criminalization of Black girls in schools. She has written dozens of articles, book chapters, and other publications on social justice issues and lectured widely on research, policies, and practices associated with improving juvenile justice, educational, and socioeconomic conditions for Black girls, women, and their families.

Morris is co-founder of The National Black Women’s Justice Institute; a lecturer for Saint Mary’s College of California and an adjunct professor for the University of San Francisco. She is a 2012 Soros Justice Fellow, the former vice president for Economic Programs, Advocacy and Research at the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and the former director of Research for the Thelton E. Henderson Center for Social Justice at the UC Berkeley Law School. Morris has also worked in partnership with and served as a consultant for state and county agencies, national academic and research institutions, and communities throughout the nation to develop comprehensive approaches and training curricula to eliminate racial/ethnic and gender disparities in the justice system. Her work in this area has informed the development and implementation of improved culturally competent and gender-responsive continua of services for youth.

Morris’ research intersects race, gender, education and justice to explore the ways in which Black communities, and other communities of color, are uniquely affected by social policies. Among other publications, Morris is the author of "Representing the Educational Experiences of Black Girls in a Juvenile Court School" (Journal of Applied Research on Children, 2014); "Sacred Inquiry and Delinquent Black Girls: Developing a Foundation for a Liberative Pedagogical Praxis" (In Understanding Work Experiences from Multiple Perspectives, edited by G.D. Sardana and Tojo Thatchenkery, 2014); Educating the Caged Bird: Black Girls and the Juvenile Court School (Poverty & Race, PRRAC, 2013) and Race, Gender and the School to Prison Pipeline: Expanding Our Discussion to Include Black Girls (African American Policy Forum, 2012). Her 2008 study, A Higher Hurdle: Barriers to Employment for Formerly Incarcerated Women (UC Berkeley School of Law), which is one of the first testing studies to examine the impact of a criminal record or period of incarceration on the employment outcomes of women, was referenced in a special report commissioned by Congressman Danny K. Davis (D-IL).

Morris is a member of the OJJDP National Girls Institute Expert Panel and the California Board of State and Community Corrections’ Committee on Reducing Racial and Ethnic Disparity. She is also an advisory board member for Global Girl Media, Oakland and regular contributor to Ebony.com.

Chairty Tolliver

Tolliver is the Founder and Project Director of Black on Both Sides. A seasoned and nationally recognized youth development specialist, Tolliver grew up in the Englewood neighborhood of Chicago. She is a foster mother, writer, and spoken word artist, and former director of one of the largest and oldest organizing groups in Chicago, Southwest Youth Collaborative. In over thirteen years in the field of Youth Development, she has worked on campaigns on a broad range of issues, including fair housing, labor rights, school reform, prison reform, and LGBT youth rights. In 2012 she was selected as one of seven activists nationwide to receive the Alston Bannerman Fellowship, and is a 2013 George Soros Senior Justice Fellow. Charity identifies as a Black woman and mother, and uses feminine pronouns. She is not youth-identified, although the UN Declaration on the Rights of Youth might disagree.

Chacyln Hunt

Hunt is an attorney and police misconduct organizer in Chicago and works with youth of color and their experiences with police. Her project integrates civil rights education with research and legal strategy driven by the kids' everyday experiences with law enforcement. The students she works with participate in role plays and produce interviews with their classmates. We (a group of professionals) spend months with the kids learning from them, and helping them gain a critical distance from their experiences in order to advocate for police accountability.             

For more information about this and other Fielding Educational Series sessions, please visit fielding.edu/events.

Tags: gender empowerment, EdD, Education Doctorate, diversity, organizational change, conversation, leadership, adult learning, national session, fielding graduate university, human rights, criminal justice

President of The Chicago School of Professional Psychology (TCSPP) Patricia Arredondo, EdD, to Discuss Latina Feminism

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Tue, Jul 14, 2015

President of The Chicago School of Professional Psychology (TCSPP) Patricia Arredondo, EdD, to Discuss Latina Feminism at the Fielding Educational Series in Rosemont, IL

Latinas in the U.S. are in the process of claiming their power through higher education while navigating cultural divides in personal and professional relationships and in other social contexts.

SS15_Ed_Series_graphic-heart_ArredondoOn Wednesday, July 15, 2015 from 4–6 pm at the Westin O’Hare in Rosemont, IL , the President of The Chicago School of Professional Psychology (TCSPP) Patricia Arredondo, EdD will discuss how Latina feminism influences peoples relationship-oriented cultural worldview and sense of fairness and social justice. As part of its National Summer Session in Rosemont, IL, Fielding Graduate University invites the extended Chicago community to join this educational presentation sponsored by Fielding’s Worldwide Network for Gender Empowerment, titled Leading from the Heart and Cultural Roots. This event is free and open to the public.                                                                                  

Latina feminism is influenced by our relationship-oriented cultural worldview and sense of fairness and social justice. This feminist framework is rooted in historic events that place a value on education, community engagement, and compassion. Latinas in the U.S. are in the process of claiming their power through higher education while navigating cultural divides in personal and professional relationships and in other social contexts. Dr. Arredondo will present concepts and models, often invisible to Latinas themselves that contribute to our sense of identity and empowerment.

About Patricia Arredondo, EdD

Arredondo_Commencement_PhotoPatricia Arredondo, EdD, became president of Chicago campus of The Chicago School of Professional Psychology (TCSPP) in February 2013. She joined the school after successfully serving in senior administrative roles with the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and Arizona State University. Additionally, she led an organizational consulting firm addressing diversity in the workplace in Boston for 13 years. As of June 2015, she has assumed a new position with TCSPP as Senior Advisor for Institutional Initiatives.

In the academic world, Arredondo is a national leader and scholar on many fronts, extensively published in the areas of multicultural competency development, immigrant issues in counseling, counseling with Latinas/os, women’s leadership and, organizational diversity. She has authored more than 100 referred journal articles, book chapters, and training videos and is regularly invited for keynote addresses nationally and internationally. Her latest book, Culturally Responsive Counseling for Latinas/os was published in 2014 by the American Counseling Association (ACA) Press. Currently, Arredondo is also co-principal Investigator on a three-year training grant from the National Science Foundation that advances women of color in the STEM fields to administrative opportunities at Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Tribal Colleges. She considers herself a social justice advocate and an educator at heart.

Civic and professional organization leadership is visible throughout Arredondo’s career. She served as president of four national associations, among these was the American Counseling Association (ACA), the largest counseling association in the world. She is the only Latina to serve in that position. Arredondo was also president of the American Psychological Association Division 45 - Society for the Psychological Study of Ethnic Minority Issues, the Association of Multicultural Counseling and Development of the ACA and the founding president of the National Latina/o Psychological. In the civic arena, Arredondo has always been active in community activities. Among her leadership roles were president of the Board of Family and Children’s Services in Boston, on the board of the Diversity Leadership Committee for the City of Phoenix, Vice-Chair of the Social Development Commission for Milwaukee County, the largest anti-poverty organization in Wisconsin, and more recently she was appointed to the Advisory Board for DiversityMBA Magazine in Chicago. She chairs the Board of Professional Affairs for the American Psychological Association.

Arredondo has been the recipient of many awards and recognitions throughout her career. Many of these awards acknowledge her as a “pioneer” or change agent in her profession. She is the 2013 recipient of the prestigious Henry Tomes Award for Distinguished Lifetime Contributions to the Advancement of Ethnic Minority Psychology, the “Living Legend” award from the ACA, the Lifetime Achievement Award from APA Division 45, the Madrina Award by the National Latina/o Psychological Association, and an honorary degree from the University of San Diego; she also holds Fellow status with the American Counseling and American Psychological Associations. She enjoys promoting women’s leadership, mentoring graduate students, emerging professionals, entrepreneurs, and individuals who want to make a difference on behalf of others.

Arredondo holds degrees from Kent State University, Boston College, and Boston University. She is a licensed psychologist and bilingual in English and Spanish. Arredondo is extremely proud of her Mexican American heritage. Arredondo is family-centered and enjoys her extended family engagements across the country.

 For more information about all of the Fielding Educational Series please visit https://www.eventbrite.com/e/fielding-educational-series-summer-2015-registration-17487812518.

Tags: EdD, social justice, educational leadership, diversity, sociology, leadership, adult learning, fielding graduate university, human rights, learning

Fielding Selected as a 2015 Best Value School Award Recipient

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Thu, May 21, 2015

Fielding Graduate University has been selected out of nearly 8,000 postsecondary schools as the recipient of a Best Value School award.

Best Value Award 2015The award is issued by University Research & Review (URR) (https://www.urandr.org/about-us), a company dedicated to improving the process of how a student selects a postsecondary school.

“Given Fielding’s focus on providing affordable and personalized graduate education through our technologically-advanced face to face learning model, we are truly honored to receive the Best Value School award for a second consecutive year,” noted Fielding President Katrina Rogers, PhD.

President Rogers accepted the award on behalf of the university from URR founder Joseph Schmoke. "It is our distinguished pleasure to present the award to Fielding Graduate University," Schmoke states. "We hope current students and alumni take pride in this honor and anyone searching for a quality, reasonably priced college education strongly considers Fielding."

The committee that reviewed more than l00 nominees out of the thousands of eligible schools is made up of former university presidents, CEOs, provosts and professors. Schools cannot pay to receive the award; it has to be earned through the nomination and committee evaluation process. Fielding was chosen by the committee because it passed rigorous standards including a combination of cost, accreditation, variety and quality of school programs, and student satisfaction with the institution.

President Rogers added, “Here at Fielding, we hold ourselves to the highest educational standards to foster individual development, community collaboration and societal engagement. We are proud to be recognized for the true value we bring to our students’ educational careers.”

“Our committee prides itself on combining our extensive experience, knowledge of postsecondary education and insight into what provides students with good value when selecting a Best Value award recipient,” said Schmoke.

Fielding will retain the Best Value School designation for one year. Award recipients must re-qualify every year.

 URR medallion 2015BV medallion 2015

Tags: educational leadership, leadership, adult learning, higher education, fielding graduate university, graduate education

Fourth Fielding Monograph Published: Leadership Studies in Healthcare

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Thu, May 14, 2015

New research on leadership in healthcare is the focus of the latest edition of the ongoing monograph research series. 

Fielding monograph number 4 resized 600Titled “Leadership Studies in Healthcare,” this monograph is edited by Fielding Professor Marie Farrell, EdD, former visiting Professor at Harvard School of Public Health, who also served as program manager for nursing, midwifery, and social work for the World Health Organization (WHO).

This publication includes seven recent researches from outstanding Fielding’s School of Human Organizational Development (HOD) graduates. Paula Rowland, PhD, addresses hospital safety, a perennial concern, in her analysis of patient safety discourses in a Canadian hospital. Cheryl Nance, PhD, examines the impact of a year-long intervention program among hospital leadership, using Action Learning. Ellen Raboin, PhD, investigates phenomena of collaborative practice within a hospital’s healthcare team. Beth Houskamp examines certain transformational leadership practices of Clinical Nurse Leaders, based on her research in five inpatient units. 

Additionally, Maureen Gormley, PhD, chief operating officer of the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, addresses the ways in which attitudes towards individuals with intellectual disability (ID) were changed through an innovative program, Project Search. Cheryl Mitchell, PhD, studies the dynamics of blame in the highly charged environment of the healthcare workplace—a subject about which a clear lacuna exists in the literature. Stephen Redmon, PhD, concludes this monograph with an incisive inquiry into the experiences and effects on service-disabled veterans and their family members.

This Fielding monograph is now available worldwide on all of Amazon’s distribution channels here. An electronic version of the book, to be distributed by Apple iBooks, is in preparation. 

================================================

Introduction to Leadership Studies in Healthcare:

Effective leadership is a vital component of any organization, and nowhere more so than in the healthcare sector. Increasingly, researchers and practitioners have begun to treat healthcare
organizations as uniquely complex systems, made up of diverse human constituencies and resources that rely on innovative leadership to not only function properly but also produce the best possible clinical care for patients and their families. This monograph explores some of the challenges of healthcare leadership in a time of ongoing reorganization and consolidation in the healthcare industry and the transformative changes in the wake of government-mandated health insurance.

Dr. Paula Rowland addresses hospital safety, a perennial concern, in her analysis of patient safety discourses in a Canadian hospital. She argues that, whereas traditionally patient safety has been seen at the intersection between complicated systems and fallible human agents, it might be reframed as a multi-dimensional issue drawing from sociological and organizational studies.

Dr. Cheryl Nance presents an approach to changing an organized delivery system’s culture. She examines the impact of a year-long intervention program among hospital leadership, using Action Learning, to manage the cultural transformation involved with opening of a new facility while remaining financially viable. Her research identifies significant differences among leaders across all departments in current and preferred culture types, and relates them to the factors deemed essential to the success of the system’s change.

Dr. Ellen Raboin’s research focuses on the phenomena of collaborative practice within a hospital’s healthcare team. She examines the factors considered as legitimate and important enablers of a successful working relationship within an interprofessional team, and shows the ways in which the team’s collaborative practices change over time in light of the presence of the patient and his or her family. Dr. Raboin uses methods from a communications perspective as well as from relational social constructionism.

Beth Houskamp turns our attention to the transformational leadership practices of Clinical Nurse Leaders, based on her research in five inpatient units. Her research indicates that, as a group, licensed personnel and those with advanced educational preparation perceived the transformational leadership practices of Clinical Nurse Leaders to be higher than did a group of unlicensed personnel and those with less education.

Dr. Maureen Gormley, the Chief Operating Officer of the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, addresses the ways in which attitudes towards individuals with intellectual disability (ID) were changed through an innovative program, Project Search, and how workplace stigma was experienced from the perspective of co-workers. Her findings suggest that participants who initially held negative perceptions related to the youths’ anticipated capabilities and behaviors overcame those perceptions by identifying the positive contributions that youth with ID made to the workplace.

Dr. Cheryl Mitchell studied the dynamics of blame in a highly charged environment of the healthcare workplace—a subject about which a clear lacuna exists in the literature. Her study of 17 senior healthcare leaders exposes the often corrosive effects of the “blame game” when “things go bad,” and how a positive, reinforcing, feedback loop can help counteract the damage of trying to allocate blame.

Dr. Stephen Redmon concludes this monograph with an incisive inquiry into the experiences and effects on service-disabled veterans and their family members of a unique Entrepreneurship Boot Camp for Veterans Family Program (EBV-F). This program was designed to support veterans experiencing discontinuous life transitions while strengthening their entrepreneurial skills. The data suggested that participants experienced the program as being truly transformative, by strengthening their self-perceptions and their situations, and by engaging them in new roles and relationships.

We would like to thank each of the authors for their important contributions to this monograph, while also expressing great appreciation to the members of our editorial board, who thoughtfully joined us in the peer review of this edition, including Drs. David Willis, Miguel Guilarte, Barbara Mink, and Stephen Murphy- Shigematsu. Great appreciation also goes to our wonderfully diligent editorial coordinator, Gwen DuBois-Wing, and our copy editor, Margaret Bonanno.
Our hope is that this edition of the Fielding monograph series will support a growing recognition of the preeminent role of leadership in healthcare systems, not only in American and international academia, but also as an extension of our pursuit of human wellbeing and the key role that the public and private sectors play therein.

MARIE FARRELL, HEALTHCARE LEADERSHIP EDITOR
JEAN-PIERRE ISBOUTS, MONOGRAPH SERIES EDITOR

 

 

 

 

Tags: psychology, Transformational learning, fielding faculty, higher education, fielding graduate university, healthcare, graduate education, military psychology, veterans

Psi Chi Chapter of Fielding Graduate University Raises $1,800 for Big Brothers Big Sisters

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Mon, Mar 30, 2015

With only two weeks to fundraise, members, faculty and psychology students in the Psi Chi Chapter of Fielding Graduate University raised more than $1,800 for Big Brothers Big Sisters of Santa Barbara County.

By Melinda Johansson for the Family Service Agency |

Psi Chi check presentation Jan 2015 resized 600

This achievement, which includes a $500 match from Fielding Graduate University, sponsors a Big and Little match for one year.

“We are very thankful to Brothers Big Sisters of Santa Barbara County for all they do to support the emotional development of children,” said Jeanie Metivier, president of Fielding Graduate University Psi Chi Chapter. “We are thrilled to champion their work and appreciate Fielding Graduate University’s commitment and support of student organizations that make projects like this possible.”

Fielding Graduate University Psi Chi Chapter is a local chapter of Psi Chi, the International Honor Society in Psychology. The honor society is open to Fielding psychology students who have a 3.5 GPA or higher.

The mission of Psi Chi has several goals, one of which is to "promote ethical and socially responsible members and leaders." One way for members to learn social responsibility and leadership is through chapter service projects.

Big Brothers Big Sisters was selected as a service project for a few reasons, primarily because members had clinical or personal experiences with its programmatic results and wanted to support the emotional health and well-being of Santa Barbara County citizens.

Big Brothers Big Sisters is recognized as the single most effective prevention-based mentoring program in the United States. At-risk children ages 6 to 15 are carefully matched with caring adult mentors, who help them reach their full potential trough one-to-one relationships built on trust, friendship, consistency, support and guidance. In a recent national report titled The Mentoring Effect, it has been determined that young people who are mentored show improvements academically, socially and economically. These types of improvements are a direct result of the investment in our most valuable resource, our community’s children, which will lead to stronger and safer communities.

Locally, Big Brothers Big Sisters is a program of Family Service Agency.

— Melinda Johansson is the marketing manager for Family Service Agency.

Photo from left, Sean Whaley, Big Brother and Family Service Agency board member; Jeremy Jinkerson, vice president of the Psi Chi Chapter; Tiffany Duffing, secretary of the Psi Chi Chapter; David Edelman, vice president of advancement and development for Fielding Graduate University; April Harris-Britt, Ph.D., faculty sponsor for the Psi Chi Chapter, with daughter Aliyah Colin Lim, treasurer for the Psi Chi Chapter; and Jeanie Metivier, president of the Psi Chi Chapter. (Family Service Agency photo)


Tags: psychology, higher education, fielding graduate university, scholar activist

Fielding Announces Appointment of Gerald Porter, PhD, as Provost and Senior Vice President

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Wed, Mar 04, 2015

Fielding Graduate University President Katrina Rogers, PhD, recently announced the appointment of Gerald Porter, PhD, to the position of provost and senior vice president.

Gerald Porter“On behalf of the students and faculty, I am pleased to welcome Gerald Porter to the Fielding community. With his experience in both psychology and education, he brings a critical cross-disciplinary outlook to the role of provost. We look forward to his leadership and guidance in the coming years to advance our mission to graduate adults prepared to create positive lasting change in the world,” said Rogers.

Porter comes to Fielding with an extensive background spanning both education and psychology, with an emphasis in curriculum and program development.

“My personal teaching and academic philosophy is completely consistent with Fielding’s distributive model of graduate education,” Porter stated, “For many years, I have had a personal and professional interest in alternative models of higher education, especially graduate and doctoral study.”

Graduate Education Curriculum and Program Development Expert

Prior to joining Fielding, Porter served as vice president of Academic Affairs and professor at Forest Institute in Springfield, MO. At Forest, he oversaw the APA reaccreditation of the doctoral program in Clinical Psychology, managed the implementation and accreditation of a new standalone master of arts in Marriage and Family Therapy, instituted embedded assessments as part of a new comprehensive examination model for the PsyD program in clinical psychology, implemented a new externship program in partnership with a major health service provider in southern Missouri, and introduced a quick admit recruitment program that increased master’s program admissions by over 30 percent.

From 2010-2011, Porter was responsible, in part, for the development of Apple Core, a childhood obesity prevention program, in partnership with Premera Blue Cross while serving as dean in the School of Natural Health Arts and Sciences at Bastyr University. He also created and chaired the university-wide Diversity Committee, chaired the Indigenous Studies Workgroup, and managed the planning and launch of an undergraduate program in integrated human biology.

As dean of the School of Education at the State University of New York at Cortland, Porter directed several major projects including the opening of a new school of Education complex, served as co-chair for the Cortland Professional Development School in partnership with the Cortland City School District. He established and served as chair of a new regional professional development school in Cortland with seven participating school districts, oversaw mini‐grant programs for faculty, P‐12 teachers, and school districts funded with Critic Teacher funds secured from the state, served as chair for the Physician’s Pedagogy Group to develop pedagogical skills training for medical school faculty, and served on the Advisory Board of the groundbreaking Cortland Urban Recruitment of Educators (CURE) program. 

While at SUNY Oswego, Porter’s responsibilities included collaborating with the graduate dean to finalize development of a credit-bearing graduate interdisciplinary certificate in gerontology, developing an accelerated master’s in counseling program, developing and teaching over ten new elective courses generating significant revenues, establishing a collaboration between the Department of Counseling and Psychological Services (CPS) and the International Center for the Study of Psychiatry and Psychology. He was instrumental in establishing an expressive arts sequence in the CPS Department, reorganized comprehensive examinations in master’s and Certificate of Advanced Studies programs, and developed master’s thesis alternatives in degree programs.

Social Justice Advocate

While employed as a program manager and trainer for the New York State Education Department, Porter helped to develop the Adolescent Vocational Exploration (AVE) and Structured Educational Support Programs (SESP). These statewide programs, implemented in partnership with regional service providers, prepared at-risk youth for high school completion, job readiness, and postsecondary education. Porter also contributed to the development of workshops and graduate coursework in gender and race equity for the New York State Sex Equity Technical Assistance and Resource Center. As director of client programming at the Columbia County ARC, Porter lead the development of all curriculum, including basic education, self-care, and recreation for developmentally disabled adults at the startup of a day treatment center.

Fielding in the Future

In a recent interview, Porter was asked about the future of Fielding. He stated, “As President Rogers advocates, we want to strengthen our existing programs, and diversify our offerings with targeted new programs that will respond to the emerging needs of our society in the 21st century, and enable adult learners who have been our traditional population, to grow, realize their self-chosen goals, and adapt more successfully to the changing environment. Fielding is well positioned to assume a leadership role in the more competitive and diverse academy that is emerging. We have a proven model based on a unique vision and understanding of adult focused higher education that has been tested over many years of practical experience. Fielding offers a viable model for adults who are embedded in the demands of life to pursue rigorous transformative graduate study while continuing to honor those life commitments. In this economically challenging time, this is what people desperately need: a pathway to personal and professional growth. Fielding has found a way, arguably the best way, to provide graduate and doctoral education to adults in the tumultuous new environment facing higher education. I am persuaded that our commitment to social justice informed by the necessary self-examination demanded by our transformational learning process will assure Fielding’s continuing success and relevance.”

Porter holds a PhD in educational psychology and statistics, Certificate of Advanced Studies (CAS) in the School of Psychology and an MS degree in educational psychology and statistics from the University at Albany, State University of New York. He is permanently certified in the School of Psychology in New York State and is a Certified Clinical Psychopathologist from the National Association of Forensic Counselors.

 

Tags: higher education, fielding graduate university, graduate education

Fielding Founder Frederic Hudson Passes Away

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Mon, Mar 02, 2015

Fielding Founder Frederic Hudson Leaves a Lasting and Meaningful Impression in Higher Education

President Katrina Rogers, PhD, reflected on the passing of Frederic Hudson:

Hudson 1On February 9th, I received a call from Pam McLean that her spouse of many years, Dr. Frederic Hudson, had passed away with his family by his side. As so many of you know, Frederic was one of the Fielding’s founders and has always been characterized as a true visionary. Many of our faculty were hired directly by Frederic. As it happens, we have been writing a history of Fielding with the assistance of Keith Melville, HOD faculty member, who was hired by Frederic. Keith interviewed Pam in December with her son, and learned much more about Frederic’s life and work. We look forward to honoring his work through Fielding's history. Below is his full obituary as published in the Santa Barbara Independent.

(Santa Barbara Independent 2/25/15): Monday, February 9th, 2015, Frederic Hudson died at the age of 80 at home and surrounded by family in Santa Barbara after a long journey with Alzheimer’s disease. He leaves behind his wife, Pamela McLean and their three children, Christopher, Michael and Charles; and three children Jeffrey, John and Lisa along with their spouses and five grandchildren from his first marriage.

Dr. Hudson was a key visionary and Founding President of The Fielding Institute (now FieldingHudson 2 Graduate University), 1974-1986, one of the first blended learning institutions accredited in the U.S. In 1986 he transitioned from Fielding to establish The Hudson Institute of Santa Barbara (now The Hudson Institute of Coaching) – a learning organization focused on the intersection of development and change in the lives of leaders today.

A Rockefeller and Danforth Fellow, he earned his Master of Divinity in social ethics from Colgate Rochester Divinity School in 1959, and in 1968, his PhD in interdisciplinary studies (psychology, philosophy, and religion) from Columbia University. His research and dissertation studied a group of social activists working in NYC between 1890 and 1920. He was Associate Dean of Stephens College, Columbia, Missouri, 1961-64; Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Colby College, Waterville, Maine, 1964-69; Academic Dean and Professor of Philosophy at Lone Mountain College (now University of San Francisco), 1968-74. Dr. Hudson wrote The Adult Years (1992, revised 1999) Jossey-Bass Publishers. In 1996 he co-authored The Joy of Old, and with his partner, Pamela McLean, PhD, wrote LifeLaunch – A passionate guide to the rest of your life. In 2001 he wrote The Handbook of Coaching, an early and seminal book on what was then the emerging field of leadership coaching.

Frederic had many talents and passions including a lifelong love of his piano, writing, dancing, the game of tennis, the creativity of photography, the fun of birding and the mysteries of nature.

For those wishing to make contributions to commemorate his life and work, contributions can be made in honor of the life of Frederic Hudson to Fielding Graduate University’s Frederic Hudson Scholarship Fund, dedicated to promising doctoral students who would not otherwise have the means to pursue their learning goals. Fielding Graduate University, 2020 De La Vina Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93105. Notes and condolences may be sent to the family at: Hudson Institute, 41C Hitchcock Way, Santa Barbara, CA 93105

- See more at: http://www.independent.com/obituaries/2015/feb/17/frederick-hudson/#sthash.S1x0a1H3.dpuf (accessed 2/25/15)

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For more information about the Fredric Hudson Scholarship Fund, email giving@fielding.edu, or visit: http://giving.fielding.edu/.

Tags: fielding graduate university