Fielding Graduate University News

Fielding's New Media Psychology Program Director Jerri Lynn Hogg, PhD On Media Psychology and Technology for Good

Posted by Hilary Molina on Wed, Oct 14, 2015

As president of the American Psychological Association’s Division 46-Society for Media Psychology and Technology, Jerri Lynn Hogg, PhD, now takes on the role as program director of media psychology at Fielding Graduate University.

Jerri Lynn HoggDr. Hogg stepped right into her new role with ease. Coming from years of grounded experience in both academic and professional settings, her teaching experience at a variety of post-secondary organizations, along with her numerous years of involvement in the media psychology program at Fielding, Dr. Hogg is poised and ready to drive media psychology further into the educational forefront of the 21st century. Dr. Hogg's vision of the future of media psychology as a disciple was clearly outlined during her interview for the position of director:

The future of media psychology is impacted by the psychological foundations which form the building blocks of this discipline. These building blocks are what separate us from big media studies departments and other educational areas that hover in the same research space as media psychology. Media psychology is a broad umbrella-based psychology that is grounded in psychology, and also engages theories and research from a variety of other fields that study media and technology.

At Fielding, I believe that we are at a place where we have the opportunity to do something special, to influence peoples’ lives in important and meaningful ways. From understanding how mobile applications can best be used to encourage fitness, or stimulate happiness and mental well-being to create powerful advocacy campaigns and disaster relief efforts, such as the one most recently implemented by the Red Cross app that facilitated donations for the relief efforts in Nepal; we can learn about, demonstrate and research, how emergent technologies are enhancing our lives in powerful ways. By studying the psychological components engaged when we connect with media and technology we can inform better design and application.

For example, we can apply theory to emergent technologies to create and further define dynamic learning environments, use augmented and virtual reality to find new ways to understand and view the world, create delivery models that are media rich in presence, yet can cross geographical and time boundaries, and we can construct media that facilitates socially responsible advocacy for the betterment of humanity. With the ability to connect in more meaningful ways, collaborate cross-boundaries and cultures, share knowledge by making information more readily available and understandable, media psychology is a force for motivation, well-being, and good.

In her newest role as program director, Dr. Hogg continues to affirm the direction she sees the program going and why Fielding is the place for this vision. "It is my goal to continue to foster an energetic research center in media psychology which includes a collaborative learning space and a think-tank environment that provides businesses, organizations, nonprofits, and foundations a place to seek advice, consult, and research the intersection of human behavior and media and technology," stated Dr. Hogg. "My vision for the media psychology program within Fielding is to continue to establish the culture and identity of the program with administration, admissions and marketing, and the university in general, so we can best advertise, promote and attract students who are interested in media psychology...We are best aligned for positive outcomes, and impact, that includes strong student learning and ground breaking research, when there is a good fit. It is the story, the vision, and the cohesive message that allows not only the potential to understand who we are, but creates the vision of what we commit to as a program, a program that embraces the breadth of the field of media psychology in a foundational manner and offers specializations as our core niche. Current proposed certificates in neuroscience, brand psychology, and immersive media are a good start in this direction."

One of Dr. Hogg's areas of interest as a media psychologist is to look at virtual and augmented environments to see how people can bring a sense of presence to these environments - to make it feel as real as when we share physical presence. She frequently speaks on psychological components and influences of media and technology on human behavior and she continues to uncover new areas for research and understanding.

Dr. Hogg began her career studying engineering and then made the unusual jump to journalism and communications. While it might not have made sense at the time to make this transition, it fueled her interest in the science and the technology behind how people are driven to connect and communicate. To this day, she continues to examine a variety of interests, which are primarily based around how media influences people's lives, relationships, and humans make meaning out of life in a highly digitized world. Her passion continues to remain in the ways people connect and make meaning in digital environments. As Dr. Hogg continues her studies as a researcher and as a graduate of the media psychology program at Fielding, she would like to give back to her university and the field she proudly represents.

Tags: Media psychology, APA, psychology, fielding faculty, social media, leadership, clinical psychology, fielding graduate university, graduate education, scholar practitioner

Fielding Signs Partnership Agreement With the University of the Virgin Islands

Posted by Hilary Molina on Wed, Aug 19, 2015

Fielding Graduate University is partnering with the University of the Virgin Islands (UVI) who also reached agreements with the University of St. Maarten, Philipsburg, St. Maarten; the Council of Community Colleges of Jamaica, Kingston, Jamaica; Nantong University, China; Yangzhou University, China; and the University of Nebraska at Omaha.

UVI MOU Fielding

 

Photo courtesy of University of the Virgin Islands

Back row left to right: Dr. Orlando Taylor, Fielding VP of Strategic Initiatives; Dr. Linda Thomas, UVI Dean, School of Education; Dr. James S. Maddirala, UVI Associate Provost for Graduate, Global and Academic Affairs; Dr. Stephen Reames, UVI Dean, School of Business; Dr. Dorothy Agger-Gupta, Program Director, Fielding School of Human & Organizational Development ; Dr. Habtes Yegin, UVI Professor of Education. Front row left to right: Dr. Camille McKayle, UVI Provost; Dr. David Hall, UVI President ; Dr. Katrina Rogers, Fielding President; Dr. Linda Honold, Chair, Fielding Board of Trustees.

Each of the agreements, known as memoranda of understanding (MOU), are unique and share a spirit of cooperation and understanding. UVI’s MOU with Fielding is intended to establish mutually beneficial collaborations in academic programs, research, the pursuit of grants, continuing education, and certificate programs. “The common goal of the MOUs is to enhance the UVI experience, either by having students from other parts of the world in the classroom here at UVI or by having UVI students sit in the classrooms around the world,” said UVI Provost Dr. Camille McKayle, “A 21st Century education needs to be a global education. UVI graduates will find themselves in work environments with people from around the world, actually and virtually. UVI aims to prepare them for that environment by giving them opportunities to see that world so that it is a less daunting place.”

The general objective of the agreement with Fielding is to engage in long-term collaboration in fields that are compatible with the orientation and expertise of each institution. The MOU provides for possible collaborations involving a PhD collaborative program in leadership with agreed upon credits transferable from one institution to the other. This collaboration will target, though not exclusively, Fielding’s Schools of Human and Organizational Development and School of Education Leadership for Change. Students will be able to study several concentrations including, academic leadership, political leadership, ecological justice leadership and health leadership.

According to the MOU other possible collaborations include:

  • Joint courtesy/adjunct faculty appointments to support PhD degree programs at each institution
  • Faculty exchanges
  • Continuing education opportunities on selected topics
  • Faculty development in competency based education and/or prior learning assessments
  • Faculty development and technical support in instructional design
  • Joint research activity in areas of mutual interest and expertise
  • Joint applications for external grants in areas of mutual interest and expertise
  • Possible establishment of a formal center or institute on leadership and diversity to house Fielding/UVI activity possibly in conjunction with Fielding’s Institute for Social Innovation or Fielding’s new Marie Fielder Center on Democracy, Leadership and Education.
  • Joint marketing and student recruitment domestically and internationally
  • Periodic Fielding residencies in the Virgin Islands; UVI residencies in Santa Barbara, CA

The MOU is for three years with an automatic renewal unless terminated.

Fielding Graduate University President Katrina Rogers, PhD stated, “We are honored to be working with the University of Virgin Islands to support our mutual goals to develop leadership across the globe for the complex, often difficult conditions, our graduates will face over the course of their careers.  We look forward to many years of a partnership to create effective educational offerings for students that assist them in attaining their professional goals and provide skills and knowledge for their lifetime.”

Tags: globalization, educational leadership, Organizational development, fielding faculty, Competency Based Education, Distributed education, fielding graduate university, graduate education, human development, institue for social innovation, scholar practitioner

Steven A. Schapiro, EdD, Named Interim Dean

Posted by Hilary Molina on Fri, Aug 07, 2015

Steve_Schapiro5479Fielding Graduate University is pleased to announce the appointment of Steven A. Schapiro, EdD, as the interim dean of academic affairs. This position will play an important role in developing and implementing a new Fielding vision as well as insuring the integrity of its academic programs as the university undergoes significant re-structuring. “I am excited to take on this new position in order to help Fielding maintain and strengthen our leadership role in providing a progressive and truly student-centered approach to graduate education,” Schapiro stated. “In the challenging and competitive educational landscape in which we find ourselves, we have much to teach the higher education community about how to implement individualized, experiential, and competency-based learning. Our approach is not tied to “seat time” or an overly standardized curriculum, but to inquiry and authentic learning in response to individual and societal needs. At the same time, I believe that we can learn from other progressive and learner-centered institutions about doing critical and emancipatory teaching, creating collaborative learning communities in cyber-space, and responding to the needs of the tech savvy and increasingly diverse students of today.”

The new dean will eventually assume the role of accreditation liaison officer (ALO) and guide the faculty in the program review process among many other essential responsibilities. “As our new ALO,” Schapiro reflected, “I will be drawing on my experience in this role at one of our sister institutions, Goddard College. I see my role of ALO as serving as a bridge and translator between us and our accrediting agency, WASC; helping WASC to understand and appreciate the unique dimensions of our learning model and forms of authentic and performance based assessment, and helping us to understand and respond to WASC’s call for clarity about what outcomes we expect from our students’ learning experiences, how we assess that learning, and how we use that knowledge to improve our practices.”

Dr. Schapiro has enjoyed a distinguished career in higher education. He received his EdD in psychological education from the University of Massachusetts, an MAT in social studies from the Graduate School of Education at Harvard University, and a BA Magna Cum Laude in American studies from Yale University. His preparation for administration was strengthened by attendance at Harvard’s Institute for Educational Management. He has authored books, book chapters, and journal articles, and given over 50 scholarly presentations. Dr. Schapiro has served as a faculty member in Fielding’s School of Human & Organizational Development since 2000, and as the Malcolm Knowles Chair in Adult Learning since 2013. He has most recently served as senior co-chair of the Academic Senate Leadership Committee. His previous administrative work included dean for academic affairs at Goddard College where he also served as director of teacher education and special assistant to the president for Institutional Research and Planning. Dr. Schapiro will serve in the role of interim dean for the next two years before a national search is conducted.

Tags: EdD, fielding faculty, leadership, higher education, fielding graduate university, graduate education, education

Fielding Awards Honorary Degree to Michael B. Goldstein, JD

Posted by Hilary Molina on Mon, Aug 03, 2015

Convocation 2015 8541 mike and katrina resized 600On July 19, 2015, Fielding Graduate University President Katrina Rogers, PhD, conferred the honorary doctorate of humane letters on Michael B. Goldstein, JD, co-chair of the Higher Education practice of Cooley LLP. In awarding this distinction, Dr. Goldstein joined other honorees including globally-known educator Paolo Friere, civil rights activist Marie Fielder, renowned psychologist Bob Goulding, LGBTQ advocate Lynn Lukow and inspired educator Eddie Seashore.

During the hooding and conferral of the degree, President Rogers reflected on Dr. Goldstein’s accomplishments, “He is a pioneer in the development of the legal environment in higher education, a counselor at the highest levels of legislation, a leader in championing creative approaches to higher education and an advocate of the highest ideals of learning as a means towards a more just and sustainable future for humanity.”

Following the conferral, Dr.Goldstein delivered the commencement address to the Fielding Summer Session 2015 graduates titled “The Importance of Timing and Convergence: Learning to Love Competency Based Learning.” In his remarks, Dr. Goldstein pointed to the barriers to learning based not on time-in-seat but demonstrated competencies, proposing the creation of what he termed a “super-accreditor specifically for the purpose of reviewing and evaluating non-time-based approaches to teaching, learning and documenting competencies.”

Dr. Goldstein served a total of 23 years as a Fielding trustee, including as itsMike GoldsteinConvocation 2015 8575 resized 600 chair, before retiring from the board in 2015. In 2012, the board created the Michael B. Goldstein Endowed Board Scholarship for Dissertation Research Advancing Social Justice, in recognition of his longtime service as a trustee and distinguished leader. This scholarship supports research by Fielding doctoral candidates on topics that further the achievement of a specific aspect of social justice. President Rogers appointed Dr. Goldstein as co-chair of Fielding’s newly organized President’s Advisory Council.

Dr. Goldstein is the founder and headed the education practice at Dow Lohnes, which merged with Cooley in 2014. Dr. Goldstein is a pioneer in the development and rational regulation of online, competency based, and other nontraditional modes of learning, including the creation of innovative approaches to combining the resources of the nonprofit, public, and for-profit sectors to improve access to quality higher education. He is the 2014 recipient of WCET’s Richard Jonsen Award for leadership in e-learning and is widely recognized for his distinguished service to many higher educational organizations.

Before entering private law practice, Dr. Goldstein was Associate Vice Chancellor for Urban and Governmental Affairs and Associate Professor of Urban Sciences at the University of Illinois-Chicago. Prior to that, he was an Assistant City Administrator and the Director Of University Relations for New York City. Dr. Goldstein holds a BA from Cornell University, a JD from New York University and was a Loeb Fellow at the Graduate School of Design, Harvard University.

Tags: social justice, educational leadership, conference, Competency Based Education, leadership, Distributed education, national session, higher education, fielding graduate university, graduate education, scholar activist, scholar practitioner

Fielding Selected as a 2015 Best Value School Award Recipient

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Thu, May 21, 2015

Fielding Graduate University has been selected out of nearly 8,000 postsecondary schools as the recipient of a Best Value School award.

Best Value Award 2015The award is issued by University Research & Review (URR) (https://www.urandr.org/about-us), a company dedicated to improving the process of how a student selects a postsecondary school.

“Given Fielding’s focus on providing affordable and personalized graduate education through our technologically-advanced face to face learning model, we are truly honored to receive the Best Value School award for a second consecutive year,” noted Fielding President Katrina Rogers, PhD.

President Rogers accepted the award on behalf of the university from URR founder Joseph Schmoke. "It is our distinguished pleasure to present the award to Fielding Graduate University," Schmoke states. "We hope current students and alumni take pride in this honor and anyone searching for a quality, reasonably priced college education strongly considers Fielding."

The committee that reviewed more than l00 nominees out of the thousands of eligible schools is made up of former university presidents, CEOs, provosts and professors. Schools cannot pay to receive the award; it has to be earned through the nomination and committee evaluation process. Fielding was chosen by the committee because it passed rigorous standards including a combination of cost, accreditation, variety and quality of school programs, and student satisfaction with the institution.

President Rogers added, “Here at Fielding, we hold ourselves to the highest educational standards to foster individual development, community collaboration and societal engagement. We are proud to be recognized for the true value we bring to our students’ educational careers.”

“Our committee prides itself on combining our extensive experience, knowledge of postsecondary education and insight into what provides students with good value when selecting a Best Value award recipient,” said Schmoke.

Fielding will retain the Best Value School designation for one year. Award recipients must re-qualify every year.

 URR medallion 2015BV medallion 2015

Tags: educational leadership, leadership, adult learning, higher education, fielding graduate university, graduate education

Fourth Fielding Monograph Published: Leadership Studies in Healthcare

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Thu, May 14, 2015

New research on leadership in healthcare is the focus of the latest edition of the ongoing monograph research series. 

Fielding monograph number 4 resized 600Titled “Leadership Studies in Healthcare,” this monograph is edited by Fielding Professor Marie Farrell, EdD, former visiting Professor at Harvard School of Public Health, who also served as program manager for nursing, midwifery, and social work for the World Health Organization (WHO).

This publication includes seven recent researches from outstanding Fielding’s School of Human Organizational Development (HOD) graduates. Paula Rowland, PhD, addresses hospital safety, a perennial concern, in her analysis of patient safety discourses in a Canadian hospital. Cheryl Nance, PhD, examines the impact of a year-long intervention program among hospital leadership, using Action Learning. Ellen Raboin, PhD, investigates phenomena of collaborative practice within a hospital’s healthcare team. Beth Houskamp examines certain transformational leadership practices of Clinical Nurse Leaders, based on her research in five inpatient units. 

Additionally, Maureen Gormley, PhD, chief operating officer of the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, addresses the ways in which attitudes towards individuals with intellectual disability (ID) were changed through an innovative program, Project Search. Cheryl Mitchell, PhD, studies the dynamics of blame in the highly charged environment of the healthcare workplace—a subject about which a clear lacuna exists in the literature. Stephen Redmon, PhD, concludes this monograph with an incisive inquiry into the experiences and effects on service-disabled veterans and their family members.

This Fielding monograph is now available worldwide on all of Amazon’s distribution channels here. An electronic version of the book, to be distributed by Apple iBooks, is in preparation. 

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Introduction to Leadership Studies in Healthcare:

Effective leadership is a vital component of any organization, and nowhere more so than in the healthcare sector. Increasingly, researchers and practitioners have begun to treat healthcare
organizations as uniquely complex systems, made up of diverse human constituencies and resources that rely on innovative leadership to not only function properly but also produce the best possible clinical care for patients and their families. This monograph explores some of the challenges of healthcare leadership in a time of ongoing reorganization and consolidation in the healthcare industry and the transformative changes in the wake of government-mandated health insurance.

Dr. Paula Rowland addresses hospital safety, a perennial concern, in her analysis of patient safety discourses in a Canadian hospital. She argues that, whereas traditionally patient safety has been seen at the intersection between complicated systems and fallible human agents, it might be reframed as a multi-dimensional issue drawing from sociological and organizational studies.

Dr. Cheryl Nance presents an approach to changing an organized delivery system’s culture. She examines the impact of a year-long intervention program among hospital leadership, using Action Learning, to manage the cultural transformation involved with opening of a new facility while remaining financially viable. Her research identifies significant differences among leaders across all departments in current and preferred culture types, and relates them to the factors deemed essential to the success of the system’s change.

Dr. Ellen Raboin’s research focuses on the phenomena of collaborative practice within a hospital’s healthcare team. She examines the factors considered as legitimate and important enablers of a successful working relationship within an interprofessional team, and shows the ways in which the team’s collaborative practices change over time in light of the presence of the patient and his or her family. Dr. Raboin uses methods from a communications perspective as well as from relational social constructionism.

Beth Houskamp turns our attention to the transformational leadership practices of Clinical Nurse Leaders, based on her research in five inpatient units. Her research indicates that, as a group, licensed personnel and those with advanced educational preparation perceived the transformational leadership practices of Clinical Nurse Leaders to be higher than did a group of unlicensed personnel and those with less education.

Dr. Maureen Gormley, the Chief Operating Officer of the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, addresses the ways in which attitudes towards individuals with intellectual disability (ID) were changed through an innovative program, Project Search, and how workplace stigma was experienced from the perspective of co-workers. Her findings suggest that participants who initially held negative perceptions related to the youths’ anticipated capabilities and behaviors overcame those perceptions by identifying the positive contributions that youth with ID made to the workplace.

Dr. Cheryl Mitchell studied the dynamics of blame in a highly charged environment of the healthcare workplace—a subject about which a clear lacuna exists in the literature. Her study of 17 senior healthcare leaders exposes the often corrosive effects of the “blame game” when “things go bad,” and how a positive, reinforcing, feedback loop can help counteract the damage of trying to allocate blame.

Dr. Stephen Redmon concludes this monograph with an incisive inquiry into the experiences and effects on service-disabled veterans and their family members of a unique Entrepreneurship Boot Camp for Veterans Family Program (EBV-F). This program was designed to support veterans experiencing discontinuous life transitions while strengthening their entrepreneurial skills. The data suggested that participants experienced the program as being truly transformative, by strengthening their self-perceptions and their situations, and by engaging them in new roles and relationships.

We would like to thank each of the authors for their important contributions to this monograph, while also expressing great appreciation to the members of our editorial board, who thoughtfully joined us in the peer review of this edition, including Drs. David Willis, Miguel Guilarte, Barbara Mink, and Stephen Murphy- Shigematsu. Great appreciation also goes to our wonderfully diligent editorial coordinator, Gwen DuBois-Wing, and our copy editor, Margaret Bonanno.
Our hope is that this edition of the Fielding monograph series will support a growing recognition of the preeminent role of leadership in healthcare systems, not only in American and international academia, but also as an extension of our pursuit of human wellbeing and the key role that the public and private sectors play therein.

MARIE FARRELL, HEALTHCARE LEADERSHIP EDITOR
JEAN-PIERRE ISBOUTS, MONOGRAPH SERIES EDITOR

 

 

 

 

Tags: psychology, Transformational learning, fielding faculty, higher education, fielding graduate university, healthcare, graduate education, military psychology, veterans

Fielding Announces Appointment of Gerald Porter, PhD, as Provost and Senior Vice President

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Wed, Mar 04, 2015

Fielding Graduate University President Katrina Rogers, PhD, recently announced the appointment of Gerald Porter, PhD, to the position of provost and senior vice president.

Gerald Porter“On behalf of the students and faculty, I am pleased to welcome Gerald Porter to the Fielding community. With his experience in both psychology and education, he brings a critical cross-disciplinary outlook to the role of provost. We look forward to his leadership and guidance in the coming years to advance our mission to graduate adults prepared to create positive lasting change in the world,” said Rogers.

Porter comes to Fielding with an extensive background spanning both education and psychology, with an emphasis in curriculum and program development.

“My personal teaching and academic philosophy is completely consistent with Fielding’s distributive model of graduate education,” Porter stated, “For many years, I have had a personal and professional interest in alternative models of higher education, especially graduate and doctoral study.”

Graduate Education Curriculum and Program Development Expert

Prior to joining Fielding, Porter served as vice president of Academic Affairs and professor at Forest Institute in Springfield, MO. At Forest, he oversaw the APA reaccreditation of the doctoral program in Clinical Psychology, managed the implementation and accreditation of a new standalone master of arts in Marriage and Family Therapy, instituted embedded assessments as part of a new comprehensive examination model for the PsyD program in clinical psychology, implemented a new externship program in partnership with a major health service provider in southern Missouri, and introduced a quick admit recruitment program that increased master’s program admissions by over 30 percent.

From 2010-2011, Porter was responsible, in part, for the development of Apple Core, a childhood obesity prevention program, in partnership with Premera Blue Cross while serving as dean in the School of Natural Health Arts and Sciences at Bastyr University. He also created and chaired the university-wide Diversity Committee, chaired the Indigenous Studies Workgroup, and managed the planning and launch of an undergraduate program in integrated human biology.

As dean of the School of Education at the State University of New York at Cortland, Porter directed several major projects including the opening of a new school of Education complex, served as co-chair for the Cortland Professional Development School in partnership with the Cortland City School District. He established and served as chair of a new regional professional development school in Cortland with seven participating school districts, oversaw mini‐grant programs for faculty, P‐12 teachers, and school districts funded with Critic Teacher funds secured from the state, served as chair for the Physician’s Pedagogy Group to develop pedagogical skills training for medical school faculty, and served on the Advisory Board of the groundbreaking Cortland Urban Recruitment of Educators (CURE) program. 

While at SUNY Oswego, Porter’s responsibilities included collaborating with the graduate dean to finalize development of a credit-bearing graduate interdisciplinary certificate in gerontology, developing an accelerated master’s in counseling program, developing and teaching over ten new elective courses generating significant revenues, establishing a collaboration between the Department of Counseling and Psychological Services (CPS) and the International Center for the Study of Psychiatry and Psychology. He was instrumental in establishing an expressive arts sequence in the CPS Department, reorganized comprehensive examinations in master’s and Certificate of Advanced Studies programs, and developed master’s thesis alternatives in degree programs.

Social Justice Advocate

While employed as a program manager and trainer for the New York State Education Department, Porter helped to develop the Adolescent Vocational Exploration (AVE) and Structured Educational Support Programs (SESP). These statewide programs, implemented in partnership with regional service providers, prepared at-risk youth for high school completion, job readiness, and postsecondary education. Porter also contributed to the development of workshops and graduate coursework in gender and race equity for the New York State Sex Equity Technical Assistance and Resource Center. As director of client programming at the Columbia County ARC, Porter lead the development of all curriculum, including basic education, self-care, and recreation for developmentally disabled adults at the startup of a day treatment center.

Fielding in the Future

In a recent interview, Porter was asked about the future of Fielding. He stated, “As President Rogers advocates, we want to strengthen our existing programs, and diversify our offerings with targeted new programs that will respond to the emerging needs of our society in the 21st century, and enable adult learners who have been our traditional population, to grow, realize their self-chosen goals, and adapt more successfully to the changing environment. Fielding is well positioned to assume a leadership role in the more competitive and diverse academy that is emerging. We have a proven model based on a unique vision and understanding of adult focused higher education that has been tested over many years of practical experience. Fielding offers a viable model for adults who are embedded in the demands of life to pursue rigorous transformative graduate study while continuing to honor those life commitments. In this economically challenging time, this is what people desperately need: a pathway to personal and professional growth. Fielding has found a way, arguably the best way, to provide graduate and doctoral education to adults in the tumultuous new environment facing higher education. I am persuaded that our commitment to social justice informed by the necessary self-examination demanded by our transformational learning process will assure Fielding’s continuing success and relevance.”

Porter holds a PhD in educational psychology and statistics, Certificate of Advanced Studies (CAS) in the School of Psychology and an MS degree in educational psychology and statistics from the University at Albany, State University of New York. He is permanently certified in the School of Psychology in New York State and is a Certified Clinical Psychopathologist from the National Association of Forensic Counselors.

 

Tags: higher education, fielding graduate university, graduate education

Fielding Announces Acquisition of Organization Systems Renewal Master’s Program

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Fri, Feb 27, 2015

Fielding’s Master of Arts in Organizational Development and Leadership now offers students two unique delivery models

*PRESS RELEASE*

SANTA BARBARA, CA, FEBRUARY 26, 2015: Fielding Graduate University President Katrina Rogers, PhD, is pleased to announce the acquisition of the Organization Systems Renewal (OSR) master’s degree program. The OSR program is now being offered as a part of the Master of Arts in Organizational Development and Leadership (MA-ODL) program at Fielding Graduate University. On February 24, 2015, in Seattle, Washington, OSR and Fielding met to formally launch their agreement. Following the meeting, OSR and Fielding leadership, alumni, faculty and students gathered for an evening reception hosted by Fielding at The Mountaineers Program Center to publicly announce the new collaboration. “OSR and Fielding have followed a similar path in leading the field of organizational development, leadership, and change. We are honored that OSR has joined Fielding to continue our leadership together in promoting organizational effectiveness through systems change.” President Rogers said.

Fielding is headquartered in Santa Barbara, California, and was founded in 1974. A nonprofit leader in blended graduate education for over forty years, Fielding’s accreditation is maintained through the Accrediting Commission for Senior Colleges and Universities of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC). Fielding’s global, distributed community of professionals is dedicated to lifelong learning, social justice and innovation, and advancement for individuals, organizations, communities, and society. Fielding faculty members represent a breadth of scholarship and practice within the fields of clinical and media psychology, human and organizational development, and educational leadership.

The OSR program has conducted twenty cohorts in its 35-year history, boasting alumni presence in organizations such as Microsoft, Amazon, Starbucks, Boeing, Boys and Girls Clubs, the higher education sector as well as other private and non-profit organizations.

The OSR master’s degree program will be offered as a part of Fielding’s current MA-ODL program, which will now provide students with two unique delivery models. One model is the ODL~OSR Cohort allowing working professionals to obtain their degree through an in-depth learning experience that is highly collaborative and experiential. This model combines face-to-face interaction and online learning with faculty and peers who meet in Seattle and surrounding areas. Students complete online courses in the areas of leadership, design, group dynamics, and systems thinking, scheduled throughout five terms (20 months) beginning in the fall of each year. Students who complete this cohort model receive an emphasis in Organization Systems Renewal. The first ODL~OSR Cohort term begins in the fall of 2015.

The ODL~ Self-Directed is another model that allows working professionals who wish to achieve their educational goals by engaging with a diverse global community. This flexible model combines action inquiry, group engagement, and scholarship with praxis. The ODL~ Self-Directed model is a collaborative, in-depth learning experience with faculty and peers and includes two face-to-face residential sessions combined with online learning. Through full- or part-time participation, ODL~ Self-Directed can begin any fall, spring or summer term.

MA-ODL Program Director Marcella Benson-Quaziena, PhD, stated, “The two offerings coming together is a natural fit. The students are similar in their goals and desires, intellectual curiosity, heart and spirit.  The MA-ODL program is now comprised of two delivery models that reach a wide range of adult learners giving them a choice based on their engagement style, professional and personal commitments, and desire to integrate scholarship with practice.” 

For more information about Fielding Graduate University, please visit www.fielding.edu.

Tags: Organizational development, higher education, fielding graduate university, graduate education

Fielding Awarded the Carnegie Community Engagement Classification

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Thu, Jan 08, 2015

Fielding Graduate University Awarded the Carnegie Foundation Advancement of Teaching for Community Engagement Classification

The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching has selected Fielding Graduate University as one of 240 U.S. colleges and universities to receive its 2015 Community Engagement Classification.

Carnegie CEC digital seal resized 600Colleges and universities with an institutional focus on community engagement were invited to apply for the classification, first offered in 2006 as part of an extensive restructuring of The Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. Unlike the Foundation’s other classifications that rely on national data, this is an “elective” classification—institutions participated voluntarily by submitting required materials describing the nature and extent of their engagement with the community, be it local or beyond. This approach enabled the Foundation to address elements of institutional mission and distinctiveness that are not represented in the national data on colleges and universities. “The importance of this elective classification is borne out by the response of so many campuses that have demonstrated their deep engagement with local, regional, national, and global communities,” said John Saltmarsh, director of the New England Resource Center for Higher Education (NERCHE). “These are campuses that are improving teaching and learning, producing research that makes a difference in communities, and revitalizing their civic and academic missions.”

Fielding President Katrina Rogers, PhD, noted, “Our leadership sees community engagement as one of the key values of the institution. It is reflected in our strategic plan and the ways in which Fielding manifests community engagement through its mission and educational enterprise. We define community engagement as the actions that we take as an institution and through our graduates to create positive social change using the best research and practice. Our stated values support community engagement in various ways, emphasizing community building internally and externally, diversity, learner-centered education, social justice, and transformational learning.”

Fielding Graduate University was founded in 1974 as an independent non-profit graduate school, dedicated to learning for experienced, mid-career adults. Fielding’s student population consists of 1,200 with 130 faculty members all across the United States. Long before the internet, Fielding invented a pedagogical model that enabled individuals to participate in high quality graduate learning from a distance and in small groups in their communities. Fielding’s vision then and now is based on the notion that adults deserve access to graduate learning that they can apply in their communities as they study, and not only when they finish. From the beginning, Fielding expected its students to be engaged in their communities, taking from their educational experience the more relevant theories to address local issues.

Fielding’s vision for their students role in community engagement is two-fold: 1) to build a high level of knowledge and skills for their graduates to be effective in collaboration and change work; and 2) to enact through their centers and curricula the multiple ways in which Fielding can make a contribution to society. Fielding’s community engagement-focused efforts are most apparent within Fielding’s Institute for Social Innovation (ISI). The ISI’s mission and function is to turn knowledge into action for the workplace and local communities. The programs currently under the ISI include: the Women’s Network for Gender Empowerment, the Nonprofit Leadership Certificate, the World Cafe, and Evidence-Based Coaching certificates. The ISI’s Center for Public Life, is funded by a grant from the Kettering Foundation to support the Center’s services to local non-profits in the central coast region of California.

The Foundation, through the work of the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education, developed the first typology of American colleges and universities in 1970 as a research tool to describe and represent the diversity of U.S. higher education. The Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education (now housed at Indiana University Bloomington's Center for Postsecondary Research) continues to be used for a wide range of purposes by academic researchers, institutional personnel, policymakers and others.

A listing of the institutions that hold the Community Engagement Classification can be found on NERCHE’s website.

Tags: educational leadership, organizational change, evidence based coaching, higher education, fielding graduate university, graduate education, human development, institue for social innovation, Carnegie Project

Fielding Introduces New Program at the ICDL Conference in Boston

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Tue, Dec 16, 2014

Fielding Graduate University Introduces New Infant and Early Childhood Development (IECD) PhD program to 200 members of Interdisciplinary Council on Development and Learning (ICDL)

President Katrina Rogers, PhD, along with School of Educational Leadership for Change (ELC) Program Director Kathy Tiner, PhD, ELC faculty member Jenny Edwards, PhD, psychology faculty ICDL Conference 2member Debra Bendell, PhD, adjunct faculty and Program Leader, Infant and Early Childhood Development (IECD) Ira Glovinsky, PhD, and Admissions Advisor Bob Harriman attended the (ICDL) Conference in November in Boston, MA. President Rogers introduced Fielding and the new Infant and Early Childhood Development (IECD) PhD program to 200 members of ICDL. ICDL is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to redefining and promoting each child’s development to their fullest potential (www.icdl.com). Fifteen Fielding IECD students were present and the following three students presented their graduate work: Melissa Grosvenor, Carrie Alvarado, and Sara McMahan. IECD ICDL Conference 1faculty Ira Glovinsky opened the session with a keynote presentation entitled "Emotions and Mood Dysregulation in Infants and Toddlers: The Neuroscience of Moods Including the Dyadic Transactions that Lead to Positive and Negative Moods." The conference was a huge success and Fielding’s presence was greatly appreciated.

Pictured in the top left photo:Fielding IECD students Cheryl Rock and Julie Sealy Directors of the Sunshine Stimulation Centre in Barbados
Pictured in the lower right photo: Carrie Alvarado and Melissa Grosvenor

Tags: educational leadership, psychology, higher education, fielding graduate university, graduate education, infant and childhood education