Fielding Graduate University News

In Memory of Fielding Leader Frank Friedlander: A Mentor and Leader with Heart

Posted by Hilary Molina on Mon, Nov 02, 2015

Frank Friedlander

"Frank was a forthright, inquisitive, caring consultant, mentor and was one of my favorite humans...

We worked together for fifteen years jointly running consulting skills workshops every Winter and Summer Session, and invariably he would challenge and console our participants to do the best consulting that the situation allowed. Old fashioned problem solving and challenging his clients and their counselors/coaches was his marker, and he did it with warmth and sensitivity. I miss Frank - he was one of a kind and to me, the penultimate scholar/practitioner."

-Don Bushnell, PhD, Faculty Emeritus and Founding Dean and of the School of Human and Organizational Development, Fielding Graduate University

Frank Friedlander passed away on October 1, 2015 after a brief and relatively painless illness. He felt that he had had a long and rich life, and was quite accepting that it was about to end. He was 88 years old.

Frank was born in South Orange, New Jersey on September 22, 1927. He was always interested in people and why they did what they did. He graduated from Cornell University with a bachelor's degree in psychology in 1950 and went on to earn an MBA from the University of Texas in 1956. Frank then moved to Cleveland, Ohio, and went to Western Reserve University and earned his PhD in social and organizational psychology in 1962.

In 1954 he married Janet Mongan and they raised three children: Todd, Clare and Paul. The marriage ended in 1977. In 1996, he married Margaret Waters, who was his partner for the remainder of his life.

After leaving Western Reserve University with his PhD, Frank began his organization development career. In 1962 the family moved to China Lake, California where he worked at the Naval Ordnance Test Center. While there, he did research on how effective teams worked together.

In the fall of 1966, Frank and his family moved back to Cleveland, Ohio where he joined the faculty of the newly begun Organizational Behavior PhD program at Case Institute of Technology. It was the first program of its kind in the world. For the next 15 years, he taught, consulted, wrote and worked with students on their PhD dissertations. The organizational behavior program was unique at the time in that the students and faculty were considered colleagues - there was not hierarchy of faculty having all of the answers and students being in a constant learning mode - they were all equal colleagues in a rich learning environment. Frank fit in very well in this role because of his values around respect, encouragement, and striving for colleagueship with his fellow faculty and the students with whom he came in contact. He "walked the talk" and was a profound role model for many in the University and his clients.

In 1981, Frank left what is now Case Western Reserve University (the two universities joined in 1968) to join the faculty at the Fielding Graduate University in Santa Barbara, California, where he continued his work as an outstanding faculty member working with students from around the world. During his tenure at Fielding, Frank conducted frequent seminars on organizational development, and consulted in collaboration with Fielding doctoral students who served as "shadow consultants" with nonprofit organizations throughout the U.S. In 2005, Frank and Don Bushnell, PhD, the founding dean of the School of Organization Development, founded the Center for Study of Nonprofit Organizations which became the Institute for Social Innovation at Fielding. Throughout his twenty-five years as senior faculty, he guided the doctoral research initiatives and mentored thirty-five candidates for advanced study at Fielding.

During his teaching career, Frank also was an active member of the Organizational Development Network and was a frequent presenter at their annual conventions. He was also a member of the National Training Laboratories where he led groups of individuals to help them identify their strengths and areas of development as leaders and human beings.

In his later years, Frank was an active member of the Humanist Community and a founding member of the Ethical Culture Society of Silicon Valley in 2006, where he offered valuable organizational support. He led workshops and seminars, led board retreats, and mentored other founders. He was passionate about bringing "heart" into Humanism, which he felt tends towards the "heady." He often talked and wrote in the last few years about how technology made us less connected instead of more connected, and how the loss of human contact in communication left the feelings out of our relationships, which he considered a big loss. Frank always valued and encouraged real and significant interactions with those around him.

Frank made many intellectual and academic contributions over the course of a long and illustrious career. For many years he was a national leader in the study of organizations and in the field of Organization Development. Within HOD he helped develop the systems knowledge area and ran a long-standing and admired consulting skills workshop with founding dean Don Bushnell. His style was one of practical problem solving with a strong dose of challenge for his clients. He value planned agendas for meetings and workshops but successfully co-facilitated with those who had a more improvisational style. Frank was a master at simultaneously tending to content and group process. He was also a notably competitive tennis player.
Frank’s Fielding colleagues speak of his many helpful contributions to their personal and professional development. While his wisdom was highly valued, he sometimes questioned the quality of his own work as well as sought help from others. For example, while he offered guidance for fellow faculty members on how to run a doctoral committee or faculty meeting, he also would ask for advice on how to give feedback on problematic student writing. He was a mentor who always sought improvement. Because of his many talents others sought his endorsement. To quote one colleague, “Do you remember the way he would say, ‘YES!!' when he agreed with you? I do."
Frank was shy and introverted despite an often forthright and inquisitive style when in work role. A person of many facets, colleagues describe him as humble, gentle, kind, inclusive, and nourishing.  He managed to overcome his shyness in several ways including performing at national sessions as one of the HOD Spandex Dancers (you would have to witness it to understand). Frank Friedlander is most fondly remembered and dearly missed.
-Charles McClintock, PhD, School of Human and Organizational Development Professor and Dean Emeritus, Fielding Graduate University
Frank was one of those rare individuals, whether in conversation, over a meal, or in a formal seminar, left others mulling over a challenging idea and filled with the acknowledgement of having been heard. Over the years, I saw him push others--his students, colleagues, friends-- and me, to think more deeply, to pose more critical questions, and to reflect on our assumptions. Passionate about organization development and leadership, he advocated tirelessly for creating organizations that honor the development of the people who work within them. We miss him, but he is always with us at Fielding as he was committed to the way we think about learning and the way we work with our students.
-Katrina S. Rogers, PhD, President, Fielding Graduate University

 

If you would like to share any memories of Frank, please post them on Facebook>Frank Friedlander>public group, or e-mail inmemoryoffrankf@gmail.com

 

Tags: Organizational development, fielding graduate university, human development, PhD, Frank Friedlander, institute for social innovation, katrina rogers

Fielding Signs Partnership Agreement With the University of the Virgin Islands

Posted by Hilary Molina on Wed, Aug 19, 2015

Fielding Graduate University is partnering with the University of the Virgin Islands (UVI) who also reached agreements with the University of St. Maarten, Philipsburg, St. Maarten; the Council of Community Colleges of Jamaica, Kingston, Jamaica; Nantong University, China; Yangzhou University, China; and the University of Nebraska at Omaha.

UVI MOU Fielding

 

Photo courtesy of University of the Virgin Islands

Back row left to right: Dr. Orlando Taylor, Fielding VP of Strategic Initiatives; Dr. Linda Thomas, UVI Dean, School of Education; Dr. James S. Maddirala, UVI Associate Provost for Graduate, Global and Academic Affairs; Dr. Stephen Reames, UVI Dean, School of Business; Dr. Dorothy Agger-Gupta, Program Director, Fielding School of Human & Organizational Development ; Dr. Habtes Yegin, UVI Professor of Education. Front row left to right: Dr. Camille McKayle, UVI Provost; Dr. David Hall, UVI President ; Dr. Katrina Rogers, Fielding President; Dr. Linda Honold, Chair, Fielding Board of Trustees.

Each of the agreements, known as memoranda of understanding (MOU), are unique and share a spirit of cooperation and understanding. UVI’s MOU with Fielding is intended to establish mutually beneficial collaborations in academic programs, research, the pursuit of grants, continuing education, and certificate programs. “The common goal of the MOUs is to enhance the UVI experience, either by having students from other parts of the world in the classroom here at UVI or by having UVI students sit in the classrooms around the world,” said UVI Provost Dr. Camille McKayle, “A 21st Century education needs to be a global education. UVI graduates will find themselves in work environments with people from around the world, actually and virtually. UVI aims to prepare them for that environment by giving them opportunities to see that world so that it is a less daunting place.”

The general objective of the agreement with Fielding is to engage in long-term collaboration in fields that are compatible with the orientation and expertise of each institution. The MOU provides for possible collaborations involving a PhD collaborative program in leadership with agreed upon credits transferable from one institution to the other. This collaboration will target, though not exclusively, Fielding’s Schools of Human and Organizational Development and School of Education Leadership for Change. Students will be able to study several concentrations including, academic leadership, political leadership, ecological justice leadership and health leadership.

According to the MOU other possible collaborations include:

  • Joint courtesy/adjunct faculty appointments to support PhD degree programs at each institution
  • Faculty exchanges
  • Continuing education opportunities on selected topics
  • Faculty development in competency based education and/or prior learning assessments
  • Faculty development and technical support in instructional design
  • Joint research activity in areas of mutual interest and expertise
  • Joint applications for external grants in areas of mutual interest and expertise
  • Possible establishment of a formal center or institute on leadership and diversity to house Fielding/UVI activity possibly in conjunction with Fielding’s Institute for Social Innovation or Fielding’s new Marie Fielder Center on Democracy, Leadership and Education.
  • Joint marketing and student recruitment domestically and internationally
  • Periodic Fielding residencies in the Virgin Islands; UVI residencies in Santa Barbara, CA

The MOU is for three years with an automatic renewal unless terminated.

Fielding Graduate University President Katrina Rogers, PhD stated, “We are honored to be working with the University of Virgin Islands to support our mutual goals to develop leadership across the globe for the complex, often difficult conditions, our graduates will face over the course of their careers.  We look forward to many years of a partnership to create effective educational offerings for students that assist them in attaining their professional goals and provide skills and knowledge for their lifetime.”

Tags: globalization, educational leadership, Organizational development, fielding faculty, Competency Based Education, Distributed education, fielding graduate university, graduate education, human development, institue for social innovation, scholar practitioner

Fielding Awarded the Carnegie Community Engagement Classification

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Thu, Jan 08, 2015

Fielding Graduate University Awarded the Carnegie Foundation Advancement of Teaching for Community Engagement Classification

The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching has selected Fielding Graduate University as one of 240 U.S. colleges and universities to receive its 2015 Community Engagement Classification.

Carnegie CEC digital seal resized 600Colleges and universities with an institutional focus on community engagement were invited to apply for the classification, first offered in 2006 as part of an extensive restructuring of The Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. Unlike the Foundation’s other classifications that rely on national data, this is an “elective” classification—institutions participated voluntarily by submitting required materials describing the nature and extent of their engagement with the community, be it local or beyond. This approach enabled the Foundation to address elements of institutional mission and distinctiveness that are not represented in the national data on colleges and universities. “The importance of this elective classification is borne out by the response of so many campuses that have demonstrated their deep engagement with local, regional, national, and global communities,” said John Saltmarsh, director of the New England Resource Center for Higher Education (NERCHE). “These are campuses that are improving teaching and learning, producing research that makes a difference in communities, and revitalizing their civic and academic missions.”

Fielding President Katrina Rogers, PhD, noted, “Our leadership sees community engagement as one of the key values of the institution. It is reflected in our strategic plan and the ways in which Fielding manifests community engagement through its mission and educational enterprise. We define community engagement as the actions that we take as an institution and through our graduates to create positive social change using the best research and practice. Our stated values support community engagement in various ways, emphasizing community building internally and externally, diversity, learner-centered education, social justice, and transformational learning.”

Fielding Graduate University was founded in 1974 as an independent non-profit graduate school, dedicated to learning for experienced, mid-career adults. Fielding’s student population consists of 1,200 with 130 faculty members all across the United States. Long before the internet, Fielding invented a pedagogical model that enabled individuals to participate in high quality graduate learning from a distance and in small groups in their communities. Fielding’s vision then and now is based on the notion that adults deserve access to graduate learning that they can apply in their communities as they study, and not only when they finish. From the beginning, Fielding expected its students to be engaged in their communities, taking from their educational experience the more relevant theories to address local issues.

Fielding’s vision for their students role in community engagement is two-fold: 1) to build a high level of knowledge and skills for their graduates to be effective in collaboration and change work; and 2) to enact through their centers and curricula the multiple ways in which Fielding can make a contribution to society. Fielding’s community engagement-focused efforts are most apparent within Fielding’s Institute for Social Innovation (ISI). The ISI’s mission and function is to turn knowledge into action for the workplace and local communities. The programs currently under the ISI include: the Women’s Network for Gender Empowerment, the Nonprofit Leadership Certificate, the World Cafe, and Evidence-Based Coaching certificates. The ISI’s Center for Public Life, is funded by a grant from the Kettering Foundation to support the Center’s services to local non-profits in the central coast region of California.

The Foundation, through the work of the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education, developed the first typology of American colleges and universities in 1970 as a research tool to describe and represent the diversity of U.S. higher education. The Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education (now housed at Indiana University Bloomington's Center for Postsecondary Research) continues to be used for a wide range of purposes by academic researchers, institutional personnel, policymakers and others.

A listing of the institutions that hold the Community Engagement Classification can be found on NERCHE’s website.

Tags: educational leadership, organizational change, evidence based coaching, higher education, fielding graduate university, graduate education, human development, institue for social innovation, Carnegie Project

Notes from Liberia: Fielding talks about Ebola

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Tue, Nov 11, 2014

Ebola: What You Need To Know and How You Can Help

Many at Fielding Graduate University have expressed compassion and concern about those suffering with Ebola and for people in the affected countries. In an effort to keep the community informed and healthy, Fielding faculty member in the School of Human & Organizational Development, David Willis, PhD, along with doctoral student and his mentee, Ammu Shittu, recently organized a webinar open to the university. This webinar was recorded and is available by clicking here: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/79672210/FGU%20Ebola%20Information%20Webinar%2010-25-14%2C%208.59%20AM.mov

ebola quaratine workersConversations between Willis and Shittu over the past several months prompted the two to take action by reaching out to the Fielding community to connect them to the current Ebola crisis. Shittu is currently in the proposal stage of this dissertation research on Ebola, which is fitting considering his knowledge and background: he is a UN worker and served on front line zones of decelerating conflict recently in Kosovo, Afghanistan and currently in East Timor, Liberia. Willis stated, "So far the county Aminu is working in, Grand Gedeh County, is Ebola-free, but they are all taking extreme precautions. What is most worrying is the collapse of the economy...The lockdown on the capital has had many repercussions."

In this first session in a series of webinars for the Fielding community about the Ebola crisis, main topics included the local situation in Liberia, West Africa, perceptions of Ebola including fears and realities, lessons learned and what is needed, followed by questions and answers from the audience.

Further discussion was led by guest speakers Elsie Karmbo, County Health Officer, Zwedru, Grand Gedeh County, Liberia, Emmanuel Bryma Momoh, Human Rights Officer, UN Field Office, Zwedru, Grand Gedeh County, Liberia, and Fielding faculty member Marie Farrell, PhD, Fielding Graduate University.

To listen to the webinar: click here: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/79672210/FGU%20Ebola%20Information%20Webinar%2010-25-14%2C%208.59%20AM.mov


In a message to the Fielding community from President Katrina Rogers and the Fielding Human Resources Office, following information was provided:

Both the President’s office and human resources have received inquiries about Ebola in the last several days. Many of you have expressed compassion and concern about those suffering with Ebola and for people in the affected countries. Our hearts are with them under what must be very difficult circumstances. We would like to give you some additional information given the extensive media coverage of the Ebola outbreak:

  • The U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) urges all U.S. residents to avoid nonessential travel to Liberia, Guinea, and Sierra Leone. The CDC is not currently recommending that travelers avoid visiting other African countries. According to the CDC, Ebola is a very low risk for most travelers, who can protect themselves by avoiding sick people and hospitals in West Africa where patients with Ebola are being treated.
  • Ebola is a viral disease that is spread through direct contact with the blood or other bodily fluids — such as urine, saliva, sweat, or vomit — of an infected person who is showing symptoms of the disease, or from contact with objects like needles that have been contaminated with the virus.
  • Symptoms of Ebola include fever (higher than 101.5°F), severe headache, muscle pain, weakness, diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and bleeding or bruising.
  • In the U.S., those people at the greatest risk of infection from exposure in the workplace are health care workers. For all other American workplaces, travelers returning from one of the affected countries are at greatest risk.
  • The affected countries have been asked to conduct exit medical screenings of all persons at international airports, seaports and major land crossings for illness consistent with potential Ebola infection. Effective October 22, travelers from the three affected West African countries will be permitted to enter the U.S. through only five U.S. airports (Atlanta, Chicago-O’Hare, Newark Liberty, New York JFK, and Washington-Dulles), where incoming passengers from the affected region undergo medical screening.
  •  The symptoms of Ebola are, of course, similar to those of many other illnesses, so as flu season approaches, we’d like to take this opportunity to urge all of you to consider getting a flu shot, and to stay home if you do become ill. If you report to work sick, your supervisor may send you home to rest and recover. Frequent hand-washing and other basic hygiene practices are useful techniques to minimize the threat of transmitting infections.
If you have additional concerns or questions about Ebola, the following websites are available:

FAQ – Ebola, About the Disease - http://www.msf.org/article/faq-ebola-about-disease

CDC – Centers for Disease Control - http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/index.html

WHO – Global Alert and Response - http://www.who.int/csr/disease/ebola/en/

Liberia: Working with Communities Is the Key to Stopping Ebola  http://www.who.int/features/2014/liberia-stopping-ebola/en/

Stopping Ebola with Public Health Expertise, not Casual Advice http://www.huffingtonpost.com/linda-p-fried/stopping-ebola-with-publi_b_5989626.html

Major Aid Organizations

http://www.msf.org/search?keyword=ebola

http://www.directrelief.org/emergency/2014-west-africa-ebola-outbreak/

http://www.savethechildren.org/site/c.8rKLIXMGIpI4E/b.6115947/k.8D6E/Official_Site.htm

 

 


Tags: Organizational development, fielding graduate university, human development

Alumni Track: Coaching Strategies to Help Women Leaders Thrive

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Wed, Apr 23, 2014

describe the imageThe Fielding Alumni Council invites you to attend in the Third Annual Alumni Track offered at the 2014 All Schools National Summer Session.

The Alumni Track aims to bring more alumni to National Session and broaden advanced learning, collaboration, and success, for Fielding alumni scholars and practitioners. This year’s Alumni Track is packed full of intellectually stimulating topics that are relevant across all schools and is designed to build a community of practice through relationships within the Alumni Track.

All sessions are open to all alumni, students, and faculty. Check the schedule for dates and times. Registration is required. (See below for registration information)

The following session is one of eleven sessions being offered at this years All Schools National Session on Friday, July 18, 2014 from 9:30 - 10:45 am.

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Getting Back on Track: Coaching strategies to help women leaders thrive in the face of derailment

by Kevin Nourse, PhD (HOD '09), and Lynn Schmidt (HOD '09)

The primary purpose of this session is to share insights from research we conducted subsequent to our Human and Organizational Development (HOD) experience that extends and integrates our research. In doing so we seek to achieve three key outcomes:

  1. Help Fielding students, alumni, and students who are executive coaches become more effective in their work supporting the success of women leaders
  2. Inspire Fielding students to extend our research with their own dissertations
  3. Demonstrate to existing Fielding students how two HOD alumni have integrated the Fielding experience and partnered to continue learning and advancing the integration of scholarship and practice

There were a number of factors that prompted us to focus on the topic of career derailment, executive coaching and resilience. First, both of us had a compelling need to leverage the time and energy we invested in our dissertations into thought leadership materials that could help a primary focus of our professional practices – women leaders. Since we have interviewed nearly two dozen executive coaches to learn how they worked with women leaders facing derailment to help them thrive, both of us came away with great insights on alternative practices we could use with our own clients.

Second, this research project (and subsequent book we are writing) provided a great way to collaborate post-doc and rekindle the connection we had while at Fielding. In addition, it’s a great way to reconnect with other Fielding colleagues who we have long lost touch – as well as new students and alum who we have yet to meet.

Finally, this effort has prompted us to transition back into a learning mindset as we revisit our original research, review what other scholars have discovered since we completed our dissertations, and integrate new discoveries from our research efforts.

Our real hope is that in offering this session, we can create an on-going network of coaches who have passion and energy for supporting the growth and success of women leaders.

 kevin nourse resized 600

Kevin Nourse, PhD

Principal, Nourse Leadership Strategies

www.nourseleadership.com

 Lynn Schmidt resized 600  

Lynn Schmidt, PhD

HR Talent Management Leader, Group Health Cooperative

   

 More about Kevin and Lynn:

  • We are both practicing coaches (Lynn is an internal coach and Kevin is an external coach); thus, we can speak to the practical application of our research.
  • The topic represents the integration of our HOD dissertation research (Lynn explored career derailment among senior women leaders and Kevin conducted research on resilience among middle managers who experienced Hurricane Katrina).
  • We are both seasoned presenters/speakers; both of us are skilled at engaging our audiences and using interactivity to enhance participants experiences.
  • An increasing number of coaches focus on building resilience in leaders they coach.
  • Despite all that is known about women in leadership and the challenges they face, relatively few are currently in the senior most positions of organizations; our research specifically focuses on women leaders.
  • Lynn has authored several publications on talent management and leadership.

===============================================================

We hope you will take the opportunity to meet like-minded colleagues from other disciplines, build your professional network, and enjoy your time on our "virtual campus."

Alumni attend sessions and events at a discounted fee of $150. This allows access to various seminars and events scheduled by any of the three schools along with all alumni events. Registration closes promptly at 9:00 am PDT on Friday, May 2, 2014. After that date a late fee of $50 will apply.

For more information and to register, click here:  http://web.fielding.edu/events/

Tags: women's issues, leadership, adult learning, fielding graduate university, human development

Dreams of Fielding: New England Cluster Celebrates 13 Years

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Thu, Mar 13, 2014

 Helping People Change Through Dreamwork

The New England cluster celebrated thirteen years of gatherings by inviting Alice Kitchel (HOD '12) and Beth Scanzani of Dream Coach of Rockport, MA, to speak to the group about dreamwork. Special guest President Katrina Rogers also attended to discuss dreaming of Fielding's future.

Reported by Jim Webber, PhD (HOD '03)

President Rogers bonew england visitwled us over on her visit to the Fielding New England alumni group on Saturday, February 8, in Gloucester, MA. The view from host Rick Maybury’s (HOD '12) office on the waterfront was spectacular and snow-free for a change.

Present were HOD folks: Carolyn Slocombe, Kathleen Healey, Alice Kitchel, Peg Murphy, Rick Maybury, Jim Goebelbecker, Jim Webber, Leo Johnson (emeritus) and special guest Beth Scanzani.

Katrina presented her ideas and directions for raising the value of Fielding Graduate University, in other words in building our brand. Our core identity is centered on mentored transformational learning, relational learning, life-long learning, and value based education. Fielding stands for innovation in graduate education. We need to embrace new ways of thinking. Because the world needs us we must think in terms of global social systems and the future of the earth.

Change Through Dreamwork

"Dreams do work so get to work on your dreams" urged practitioners Alice Kitchel and Beth Scanzani. Dreams help us solve problems and preview future challenges. Dreams serve as a magic mirror, a secret laboratory and a creative studio. Our brain has two operating systems, one for “reality,” one for our own unfolding dreamscape. In waking life, we combine letters and words to form sentences. In dreams we combine images to spell-out associations and create a story or even a nightmare. Dreams are like having a resident life coach who knows you from inside out.

To learn from a dream you must engage with it. The process of successful “dream catching” includes: creating a record, writing the story in present tense, giving it a title, drawing-out connections, applying dream work tools and looking for themes, surprises and limiting beliefs. 

To apply this learning, we used the projective team process on a brave cluster mate’s dream. First the dreamer gave the dream a title and second she told the dream. In the third step the group asks clarifying questions followed by their own “hits,” projections and associations answering the question, “If this were my dream.” Finally the dreamer shares her hits and reactions and decides how she would like to honor the dream.

Dream we must!

Rick Maybury’s message to Katrina following the visit:

I want to thank you from all of our alums for your thoughtful and enriching visit. We are all pleased that you took the time and energy to join us and your interactions could not have been more authentic or inspiring. As I had mentioned in the meeting, it is refreshing and provides hope that the President is finally having what most of us believe to be the right conversation.

Your presentation on the state of the state, including your vision, was well balanced with reality and hope. The group also felt you authentically listened to our perspectives which would be sincerely considered in your future leadership decisions. As I hope you gathered, there are no more dedicated, passionate and devoted to the spirit of Fielding and it potential to have profound transformational impacts on its students.

Tags: Organizational development, higher education, fielding graduate university, human development

Synergy, Healing, and Empowerment: Insights from Cultural Diversity

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Wed, Mar 12, 2014

School of Human & Organizational Development Faculty Member, Stephen Murphy-Shigematsu, EdD, Co-Authors a Book with His Graduate School Mentor

"I highly recommend Synergy, Healing, and Empowerment for all those interested in indigenous psychology and cross-cultural psychology. I believe that all professional psychologists and policy makers can benefit from the profound insights of the authors." American Psychological Association

Synergy Healing and Empowerment resized 600Stephen Murphy-Shigematsu’s recent book, Synergy, Healing, and Empowerment: Insights from Cultural Diversity, has a special meaning for him as the co-author is his mentor from graduate school, Richard Katz. “Professor Katz had an unforgettable impact on my life as a mentor and to be able to write and publish a book together is amazing.”  

They first met when Katz was a professor at Harvard and Murphy-Shigematsu was a young man searching for a way to integrate his experiences in Japan studying healers into a career path. “He became a mentor in the deepest sense of seeing in me what I could not yet see in myself and trusting me in ways that led me to take on challenges that I was hesitant to accept. Our personal and professional relationship is a wonderful testimony to the power of mentoring.”

Synergy, Healing, and Empowerment is a book that originated in discussion with Katz and his many dedicated graduate students. It went through many iterations but was never completed. Katz left Harvard to become professor at what is now First Nations University of Canada where his contributions included building the Masters of Aboriginal Social Work Program. He also lived and worked with Indigenous Elders and healers around the world. After receiving his doctorate in psychology, Murphy-Shigematsu returned to Japan to be a professor at the University of Tokyo. It was many years before their paths crossed again, and the book helped to bring them together over a labor of love.

“A few years ago we were talking and I realized that the book might reach fruition as a collaborative effort so I offered my help. It is the product of the work of so many people that it is humbling to be able to claim it in any way as mine. Some of the collaborators have contributed papers while others have generated the ideas represented in the book.”

Murphy-Shigematsu describes Synergy, Healing, and Empowerment as part of the legacy of Professor Katz, representing innovative ideas he introduced at the highest levels of academia at a time when it took great courage to venture beyond the borders of an institution like Harvard. Katz’s paradigm of synergy influenced a large group of students who have gone on to distinguished careers as scholar-practitioners.

In Synergy, Healing, and Empowerment, Katz, Murphy-Shigematsu, and some colleagues offer the paradigm of synergy to overcome the scarcity of valuable health and education resources. The authors explore alternative ways in the areas of counseling, education, and community health and development to enhance synergy, expanding formerly scarce resources that can become renewable and accessible to all. Drawing upon the diverse cultural experiences of Aboriginal groups in North America and around the world, the book provides practical insights into the emergence of synergy and obstacles to its existence.

Stanley Krippner calls Synergy, Healing, and Empowerment “an incredible book, “necessary and timely,” that makes a “compelling case for the paradigm of synergy, which releases an ever-expanding network of healing and empowerment.” Paul Pedersen, a pioneer scholar in multicultural counseling, claims that it pushes the envelope and “shows the direction counseling and psychotherapy must go.” And President Katrina Rogers describes it as “a treasure, whose narrative approach to transformational education has potential to lead Fielding in conversation that allows people to open up their hearts to new ways of thinking about the complexity in the world.”

Stephen Murphy-Shigematsu

Stephen Murphy-Shigematsu is consulting professor, Stanford University School of Medicine, and a faculty member at Fielding Graduate University.

Richard Katz

Richard Katz, PhD, received his doctorate in clinical psychology from Harvard University and taught there for nearly 20 years. Over the past 45 years, he has also lived and worked with Indigenous Elders and healers around the world. Richard is currently a professor emeritus at the First Nations University of Canada and an adjunct professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Saskatchewan.

For more information: http://www.brusheducation.ca/books/synergy-healing-and-empowerment

Tags: psychology, indigenous psychology, fielding graduate university, human development

Israeli Stories of Hope and Healing

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Wed, Jan 29, 2014

Living Beyond Terrorism: Israeli Stories of Hope and Healing

Fielding Alumna and Institute for Social Innovation Fellow, Zieva Konvisser, PhD (HOD '06), publishes book relaying the experience of survivors and relatives of survivors and victims discuss their life journeys – from terrorism to hope and optimism and from grief to meaning and healing.

Lving Beyond  book cover resized 600No one can forget the devastating aftermath of a suicide bomber detonating in a crowded bus. But what happens to the survivors of such indiscriminate and horrific attacks? Will the physical and emotional scars overwhelm them, or will they be able to transcend the traumatic experience and lead healthy and fulfilling lives? Many of those who survive are able to grow and thrive, as described in Living Beyond Terrorism. This book shares compelling stories of hope and healing, as told by ordinary people who – while riding in buses, dining in restaurants, shopping in markets, studying at colleges, visiting hotels, or walking along the street – suddenly became the innocent victims of indiscriminate terrorist attacks in Israel and in the West Bank, primarily between 2000 and 2006. Forty-eight survivors and relatives of survivors and victims discuss their remarkable life journeys; they speak not just of moving on with life as usual, but of moving forward with new purpose, contributing to society, and turning tragedy into action. They bear witness to their experiences in order to make sense of them as best as they can, and to help others.

The powerful stories in Living Beyond Terrorism are testimony to their inner strength and determination and inspire each of us as we meet the challenges in our lives.

Zieva resized 600Zieva Konvisser’s diverse career has evolved from pharmaceutical chemist to automotive executive to earning a post-retirement PhD in human development. As a fellow of the Institute for Social Innovation at Fielding Graduate University, her research focuses on the human impact of traumatic events, such as terrorism, genocide, war, and wrongful conviction. She has served on the National Commission on American Jewish Women and the boards of several community, philanthropic, and professional organizations and is currently on the international board of the Israel Center for the Treatment of Psychotrauma. Whether in the laboratory, the parts distribution center, the streets of Jerusalem, or the boardroom, she has always been driven by a commitment to make a positive difference in people’s lives and the communities in which they live and work

Format: Paperback
ISBN 10: 9652296430
ISBN 13: 9789652296436
Catalog Number: 9789652296436
Number of Pages: 256
Year Published: 2014

Living Beyond Terrorism can be purchased on Amazon.com.

Tags: disaster mental health, fielding graduate university, human development, scholar activist

Was Jesus a Political Zealot or Grassroots Activist? Specialists Differ in this Exciting Fielding Event

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Mon, Jan 06, 2014

Two prominent specialists on the historical Jesus, Reza Aslan and Jean-Pierre Isbouts, will address the question: Was Jesus a political zealot or a grassroots social activist?

Fielding Graduate University is proud to present the first of five free and open to the public Fielding Educational Series presentations featuring two prominent specialists on the historical Jesus, Reza Aslan and Jean-Pierre Isbouts, who will square off on this exciting panel discussion over the question: was Jesus a political zealot, or a grassroots social activist?Ad

This discussion will be facilitated by Fielding faculty member, Rich Appelbaum, PhD, on Tuesday, January 7 from 7:00- 9:00 pm at the Fess Parker’s Doubletree Resort, 633 East Cabrillo Boulevard, Santa Barbara, CA 93103.   

The Fielding Educational Series features select presentations that are timely and relevant to current social issues from the scholarly fields of human and organizational development, psychology, and educational leadership and change. 

Reza Aslan

Reza Aslan resized 600Reza Aslan, an internationally acclaimed writer and scholar of religions, is author of the #1 New York Times Bestseller Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth. He is the founder of AslanMedia.com, an online journal for news and entertainment about the Middle East and the world, and co-founder and Chief Creative Officer of BoomGen Studios, the premier entertainment brand for creative content from and about the Greater Middle East.

Aslan's degrees include a Bachelor of Arts in Religious Studies from Santa Clara University (Major focus: New Testament; Minor: Greek) , a Master of Theological Studies from Harvard University (Major focus: History of Religions), a PhD in the Sociology of Religions from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and a Master of Fine Arts from the University of Iowa, where he was named the Truman Capote Fellow in Fiction. An Adjunct Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, he is also a member of the Los Angeles Institute for the Humanities and the Pacific Council on International Policy. He serves on the board of directors of the Ploughshares Fund, which gives grants for peace and security issues; Narrative Four, which connects people through the exchange of stories; PEN USA, which champions the rights of writers under siege around the world; and the Levantine Cultural Center, which builds bridges between Americans and the Arab/Muslim world through the arts.

Aslan's first book is the International Bestseller, No god but God: The Origins, Evolution, and Future of Islam, which has been translated into thirteen languages, and named one of the 100 most important books of the last decade. He is also the author of How to Win a Cosmic War (published in paperback as Beyond Fundamentalism: Confronting Religious Extremism in a Globalized Age), as well as editor of two volumes: Tablet and Pen: Literary Landscapes from the Modern Middle East, and Muslims and Jews in America: Commonalties, Contentions, and Complexities.

Born in Iran, he lives in Los Angeles with his wife (author and entrepreneur Jessica Jackley) where he is Associate Professor of Creative Writing and Cooperating Faculty in the Department of Religion at the University of California, Riverside. His previous academic positions include the Wallerstein Distinguished Professor of Religion, Community and Conflict at Drew University in New Jersey (2012-2013), and Visiting Assistant Professor of Religion at the University of Iowa (2000-2003).

Jean-Pierre Isbouts

Jean PierreJean-Pierre Isbouts is a bestselling author and award-winning screenwriter and film director. A humanities scholar, his research has been devoted to biblical archaeology, Renaissance Florence and 19th century Europe. He also serves as graduate professor in the doctoral programs of Fielding Graduate University in Santa Barbara, CA.

Jean-Pierre was born in Eindhoven, Holland and studied Attic Greek and Latin before continuing in archaeology, art history and musicology at Leyden University. He completed his doctoral research on the 19th century architectural firm of Carrère & Hastings at Columbia University in New York. He then joined the American Council for the Arts (ACA) in New York City, active in a number of Federally funded arts programs. ​

In the 1990's, he founded the ArtSpace studio in Los Angeles, a unit of American Interactive Media, and produced a number of programs on Renaissance and 19th century art as part of the Great Art Series; many of these were subsequently translated in seven languages. He later served as Managing Director of Philips Interactive Media Europe, a joint venture with Polygram, from its head offices in London, UK.

As a musicologist, Dr. Isbouts has produced recordings of Bach, Corelli, Handel, Tchaikovsky, Satie, Franck and Debussy with the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, the Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra, and other soloists and ensembles.​

An award-winning filmmaker, Jean-Pierre has directed stars including Leonard Nimoy, Charlton Heston and Dick van Dyke, working with Hollywood studios such as Disney, Castle Rock Entertainment, Hallmark and Agamemnon Studios. His TV programs have been broadcast on ABC, A&E, CNBC, History Channel, Hallmark Channel and PBS stations, as well as scores of television networks in Europe and Asia.

His first book, Charlton Heston's Hollywood, was published in 1998. Based on many hours of interviews with Charlton Heston, the book chronicles the astonishing transformation of post-war American cinema through the eyes of the only actor whose career spanned from Cecil B. DeMille to James Cameron.

In 2007, National Geographic Books published his first major work, The Biblical World, which became a worldwide bestseller, and the first of several books for National Geographic Society. The success of Biblical World was followed by the 2012 publication of In the Footsteps of Jesus, which sold over a 100,000 copies in the first 8 weeks of release--an unprecedented record for a large hard-cover book at a $40 price point.

In 2013, Jean-Pierre wrote his in-depth study of Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa ("The Mona Lisa Myth"), written with Dr. Christopher Brown, and began a new work on the history of Christianity. In November of 2013, National Geographic Books will publish Jean-Pierre's Who's Who in the Bible, a major reference work comprising over 2,000 men and women in the Hebrew Scriptures and New Testament.

Jean-Pierre is represented by Global Lion Intellectual Property Management, a literary agency based in New York, Los Angeles and Florida .

​Jean-Pierre is graduate professor in several doctoral programs at Fielding Graduate University in Santa Barbara (www.fielding.edu). In his spare time (or what's left of it), he likes to discover new places in Asia and the Middle East with his wife Cathie, a production executive at Pantheon Studios.

Registration and more information: www.fielding.edu/Events 

Fielding Graduate University is an accredited nonprofit leader in blended graduate education, combining face‐to‐face and online learning. Our curriculum offers quality degrees and courses for professionals living and working around in the world. Fielding’s faculty members represent a breadth of scholarship and practice in the fields of educational leadership, human and organizational development, and clinical and media psychology. Maintaining Fielding’s reputation for quality programs for over forty years, faculty are mentors and guides to self‐directed students who use their skills to become powerful, and socially‐responsible leaders in their communities, workplaces, and society.

Tags: religion, conversation, fielding graduate university, human development

Current Fielding Student, Sam Jama, Featured as Super Scholar by Ryerson University

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Fri, Aug 23, 2013
Article written my Vanessa Santilli of Ryerson University:

Sam Jama is a case study in time management. A senior analyst (compliance) for the provincial government, he is also pursuing a PhD in Human and Organizational Development at Fielding Graduate University...


To view full article about Sam Jama, click here: Ryerson University Magazine Summer 2013

Sam Jama

Tags: Organizational development, higher education, fielding graduate university, graduate education, human development