Fielding Graduate University News

Fielding Graduate University’s Worldwide Network For Gender Empowerment Granted Consultative Status To The United Nations

Posted by Hilary Molina on Sat, Oct 17, 2015

The Worldwide Network for Gender Empowerment (WNGE), a center within Fielding Graduate University, announced today that it was granted special consultative status to the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC).

Acting Chief for the Office of ECOSOC Support and Coordination Alberto Padova wrote, “I am pleased to inform you that the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) at its coordination and management meeting adopted the recommendation of the Committee on Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) to grant special consultative status to your organization. On behalf of all staff of the Non-Governmental Organizations Branch/OESC/DESA, please accept our heartfelt congratulations.”

WNGE, a global organization focused on scholar-activism impacting women’s and gender issues, has been a recognized and registered nongovernmental (NGO) with the United Nations Department of Public Information (DPI) since 2009. This special consultative status elevates WNGE into an elite circle of NGOs working directly with the functional commissions.

ECOSOC status for an organization enables it to actively engage with the United Nations Secretariat, programs, funds and agencies. These activities include:

  • Placement of items of special interest in the provisional agenda of the Council
  • Attendance at meetings and access to the United Nations offices in New York, Geneva and Vienna
  • Submission and circulation of written statements
  • Oral presentations at ECOSOC
  • Consultations with ECOSOC and its subsidiary bodies

“We are extremely pleased to have been granted special consultative status to the UN,” stated Director for WNGE Anna DiStefano, EdD. “This provides us the opportunity to more fully engage in our global advocacy and policy work focused on gender empowerment and equity.”

Fielding Graduate University President Katrina Rogers added, “We are very proud of the accomplishments of WNGE and the recognition the organization has received on the global stage. WNGE is a great example of Fielding’s focus on scholar-activism, social justice and leadership.”

Worldwide Network for Gender Empowerment (WNGE) is an engaged and diverse ecosystem comprised of global members committed to research, collaboration, and action in support of women’s and gender issues. WNGE is focused on impacting change with cross-cutting measures in sectors including education, health care, environment, violence prevention, equality, and globalization.

 

 

Tags: globalization, EdD, women's issues, leadership, fielding graduate university, human rights, katrina rogers

Policing Black and Brown Communities: Dynamics of Race, Class and Gender

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Wed, Jul 15, 2015

Policing Black and Brown Communities: A Discussion about Dynamics of Race, Class and Gender

SS15_Ed_Series_graphic-policeIn the current national conversation about police activity and brutality, especially in low income neighborhoods of people of color, we recognize that there are intersecting issues of racial classification, economic class, as well as gender and gender expression at work on our streets. Through a panel of local experts and activists on various aspects of this situation, along with Fielding Graduate University faculty, a discussion titled Policing Black and Brown Communities: Dynamics of Race, Class and Gender will focus on the debate over the right-wrong, police-citizen, for police-against police debates to a deeper analysis. Understanding the historical relationships between identified groups (eg. racially, economically, gender-based) and law enforcement in this country can help us more clearly identify paths of action to promote social justice for all peoples, rather than demonizing them based on categorical status.

As part of its National Summer Session in Rosemont, IL, Fielding Graduate University invites the extended Chicago community to this educational discussion tonight, Wednesday, July 15, 2015 from 7–9 pm at the Westin O’Hare in Rosemont, IL. This event is free and open to the public.

GUEST PANELISTS

Monique W. Morris, EdD

monique-1Morris is an author and social justice scholar with more than 20 years of professional and volunteer experience in the areas of education, civil rights, juvenile and social justice.  Dr. Morris is the author of Black Stats: African Americans by the Numbers in the Twenty-First Century (The New Press, 2014), Too Beautiful for Words (MWM Books, 2012); and Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools (The New Press, 2016), a forthcoming book on the criminalization of Black girls in schools. She has written dozens of articles, book chapters, and other publications on social justice issues and lectured widely on research, policies, and practices associated with improving juvenile justice, educational, and socioeconomic conditions for Black girls, women, and their families.

Morris is co-founder of The National Black Women’s Justice Institute; a lecturer for Saint Mary’s College of California and an adjunct professor for the University of San Francisco. She is a 2012 Soros Justice Fellow, the former vice president for Economic Programs, Advocacy and Research at the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and the former director of Research for the Thelton E. Henderson Center for Social Justice at the UC Berkeley Law School. Morris has also worked in partnership with and served as a consultant for state and county agencies, national academic and research institutions, and communities throughout the nation to develop comprehensive approaches and training curricula to eliminate racial/ethnic and gender disparities in the justice system. Her work in this area has informed the development and implementation of improved culturally competent and gender-responsive continua of services for youth.

Morris’ research intersects race, gender, education and justice to explore the ways in which Black communities, and other communities of color, are uniquely affected by social policies. Among other publications, Morris is the author of "Representing the Educational Experiences of Black Girls in a Juvenile Court School" (Journal of Applied Research on Children, 2014); "Sacred Inquiry and Delinquent Black Girls: Developing a Foundation for a Liberative Pedagogical Praxis" (In Understanding Work Experiences from Multiple Perspectives, edited by G.D. Sardana and Tojo Thatchenkery, 2014); Educating the Caged Bird: Black Girls and the Juvenile Court School (Poverty & Race, PRRAC, 2013) and Race, Gender and the School to Prison Pipeline: Expanding Our Discussion to Include Black Girls (African American Policy Forum, 2012). Her 2008 study, A Higher Hurdle: Barriers to Employment for Formerly Incarcerated Women (UC Berkeley School of Law), which is one of the first testing studies to examine the impact of a criminal record or period of incarceration on the employment outcomes of women, was referenced in a special report commissioned by Congressman Danny K. Davis (D-IL).

Morris is a member of the OJJDP National Girls Institute Expert Panel and the California Board of State and Community Corrections’ Committee on Reducing Racial and Ethnic Disparity. She is also an advisory board member for Global Girl Media, Oakland and regular contributor to Ebony.com.

Chairty Tolliver

Tolliver is the Founder and Project Director of Black on Both Sides. A seasoned and nationally recognized youth development specialist, Tolliver grew up in the Englewood neighborhood of Chicago. She is a foster mother, writer, and spoken word artist, and former director of one of the largest and oldest organizing groups in Chicago, Southwest Youth Collaborative. In over thirteen years in the field of Youth Development, she has worked on campaigns on a broad range of issues, including fair housing, labor rights, school reform, prison reform, and LGBT youth rights. In 2012 she was selected as one of seven activists nationwide to receive the Alston Bannerman Fellowship, and is a 2013 George Soros Senior Justice Fellow. Charity identifies as a Black woman and mother, and uses feminine pronouns. She is not youth-identified, although the UN Declaration on the Rights of Youth might disagree.

Chacyln Hunt

Hunt is an attorney and police misconduct organizer in Chicago and works with youth of color and their experiences with police. Her project integrates civil rights education with research and legal strategy driven by the kids' everyday experiences with law enforcement. The students she works with participate in role plays and produce interviews with their classmates. We (a group of professionals) spend months with the kids learning from them, and helping them gain a critical distance from their experiences in order to advocate for police accountability.             

For more information about this and other Fielding Educational Series sessions, please visit fielding.edu/events.

Tags: gender empowerment, EdD, Education Doctorate, diversity, organizational change, conversation, leadership, adult learning, national session, fielding graduate university, human rights, criminal justice

President of The Chicago School of Professional Psychology (TCSPP) Patricia Arredondo, EdD, to Discuss Latina Feminism

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Tue, Jul 14, 2015

Patricia Arredondo, EdD, to Discuss Latina Feminism at the Fielding Educational Series in Rosemont, IL

Latinas in the U.S. are in the process of claiming their power through higher education while navigating cultural divides in personal and professional relationships and in other social contexts.

SS15_Ed_Series_graphic-heart_ArredondoOn Wednesday, July 15, 2015 from 4–6 pm at the Westin O’Hare in Rosemont, IL, the Chicago Campus President of The Chicago School of Professional Psychology (TCSPP) Patricia Arredondo, EdD will discuss how Latina feminism influences peoples relationship-oriented cultural worldview and sense of fairness and social justice. As part of its National Summer Session in Rosemont, IL, Fielding Graduate University invites the extended Chicago community to join this educational presentation sponsored by Fielding’s Worldwide Network for Gender Empowerment, titled Leading from the Heart and Cultural Roots. This event is free and open to the public.                                                                                  

Latina feminism is influenced by our relationship-oriented cultural worldview and sense of fairness and social justice. This feminist framework is rooted in historic events that place a value on education, community engagement, and compassion. Latinas in the U.S. are in the process of claiming their power through higher education while navigating cultural divides in personal and professional relationships and in other social contexts. Dr. Arredondo will present concepts and models, often invisible to Latinas themselves that contribute to our sense of identity and empowerment.

About Patricia Arredondo, EdD

Arredondo_Commencement_PhotoPatricia Arredondo, EdD, became Chicago Campus President of The Chicago School of Professional Psychology (TCSPP) in February 2013. She joined the school after successfully serving in senior administrative roles with the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and Arizona State University. Additionally, she led an organizational consulting firm addressing diversity in the workplace in Boston for 13 years. As of June 2015, she has assumed a new position with TCSPP as Senior Advisor for Institutional Initiatives.

In the academic world, Arredondo is a national leader and scholar on many fronts, extensively published in the areas of multicultural competency development, immigrant issues in counseling, counseling with Latinas/os, women’s leadership and, organizational diversity. She has authored more than 100 referred journal articles, book chapters, and training videos and is regularly invited for keynote addresses nationally and internationally. Her latest book, Culturally Responsive Counseling for Latinas/os was published in 2014 by the American Counseling Association (ACA) Press. Currently, Arredondo is also co-principal Investigator on a three-year training grant from the National Science Foundation that advances women of color in the STEM fields to administrative opportunities at Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Tribal Colleges. She considers herself a social justice advocate and an educator at heart.

Civic and professional organization leadership is visible throughout Arredondo’s career. She served as president of four national associations, among these was the American Counseling Association (ACA), the largest counseling association in the world. She is the only Latina to serve in that position. Arredondo was also president of the American Psychological Association Division 45 - Society for the Psychological Study of Ethnic Minority Issues, the Association of Multicultural Counseling and Development of the ACA and the founding president of the National Latina/o Psychological. In the civic arena, Arredondo has always been active in community activities. Among her leadership roles were president of the Board of Family and Children’s Services in Boston, on the board of the Diversity Leadership Committee for the City of Phoenix, Vice-Chair of the Social Development Commission for Milwaukee County, the largest anti-poverty organization in Wisconsin, and more recently she was appointed to the Advisory Board for DiversityMBA Magazine in Chicago. She chairs the Board of Professional Affairs for the American Psychological Association.

Arredondo has been the recipient of many awards and recognitions throughout her career. Many of these awards acknowledge her as a “pioneer” or change agent in her profession. She is the 2013 recipient of the prestigious Henry Tomes Award for Distinguished Lifetime Contributions to the Advancement of Ethnic Minority Psychology, the “Living Legend” award from the ACA, the Lifetime Achievement Award from APA Division 45, the Madrina Award by the National Latina/o Psychological Association, and an honorary degree from the University of San Diego; she also holds Fellow status with the American Counseling and American Psychological Associations. She enjoys promoting women’s leadership, mentoring graduate students, emerging professionals, entrepreneurs, and individuals who want to make a difference on behalf of others.

Arredondo holds degrees from Kent State University, Boston College, and Boston University. She is a licensed psychologist and bilingual in English and Spanish. Arredondo is extremely proud of her Mexican American heritage. Arredondo is family-centered and enjoys her extended family engagements across the country.

 For more information about all of the Fielding Educational Series please visit https://www.eventbrite.com/e/fielding-educational-series-summer-2015-registration-17487812518.

Tags: EdD, social justice, educational leadership, diversity, sociology, leadership, adult learning, fielding graduate university, human rights, learning

Fielding Graduate University at The Justice Conference in LA

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Fri, Mar 07, 2014

Fielding Has a Visible Presence at The Justice Conference

Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Reported by Monique L. Snowden, PhD, vice president for academic services at Fielding Graduate University

Fielding recently returned to the Orpheum Theatre in Los Angeles, CA where we sponsored the International Positive Aging Conference in 2010, 2011, and 2013. This time, however, we were at the fourth annual Justice Conference promoting Fielding student, faculty and alumni’s justice work and recruiting prospective students for our academic programs.

The conference included a lineup of plenary speakers, musical and spoken word artists, and discussion panelists. Nearly 2,000 conference attendees, sponsors and exhibitors packed the theater for each scheduled speaker, artist and panelist. In between talks and performances, the main lobby, mezzanine lobby, stairways and exhibitor areas were buzzing with rich dialogue about the “work” represented and inspired by those on agenda and attending the Justice Conference.Justice Conference

Many conference attendees, plenary speakers, panelists, artists and exhibitors came into and do justice work for reasons not shared by all and are grounded by doctrines not held by all. Differences in personal motivations or beliefs notwithstanding, those whom the Fielding delegation engaged in conversation shared our university’s vision to create a more humane, just and sustainable world. By way of our institutional values and demonstrable justice work we attracted interest in both our academic offerings and partnership opportunities with organizations in attendance like Memphis Teacher Residency (MTR). MTR proclaims that “Urban Education is the Greatest Social Justice and Civil Rights Issue in America Today.”

Bryan A. Stevenson, founder and executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative, an Alabama-based group delivered a powerful message. Mr. Stevenson and his EJI colleagues have won major legal challenges eliminating excessive and unfair sentencing, exonerating innocent prisoners on death row, confronting abuse of the incarcerated and the mentally-ill, and aiding children prosecuted as adults. 

Conference attendees were consistently reminded that justice work is intensive and extensive. As one conference speaker advised, to do our best justice work, we must manage our egos, exhaustion and emotional toxicity. We must remain humble in our work, take time to rejuvenate our spirits and re-energize our bodies, and balance our passion with necessary discipline and focus. We must keep top of mind that the difficult and never-ending fight for justice is not one that merely involves lifting up and comforting those who need resources and services.

Justice work requires us to stand with the poor, fight beside the condemned, and dwell amongst the vulnerable. We must see and hold ourselves accountable as one people who are global citizens of interrelated communities, states, countries, and continents. Slain humanitarian and civil rights activist Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. left us with a timeless justice credo, “We are bound by an inescapable garment of mutuality, whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly.

For more information about The Justice Conference, click here: http://thejusticeconference.com/

Tags: social justice, diversity, fielding graduate university, human rights

Exploring the Struggle for Social Justice in Washington DC

Posted by Marianne McCarthy on Tue, Sep 03, 2013

Fielding Graduate University Students, Faculty and Alumni Seeing Social Justice In Action

by Marianne McCarthy

During Fielding Graduate University's All School National Session, in Alexandria, VA, students, alumni, and faculty stepped into tSJ Strugglehe community to see the struggle for social justice first hand.

In a true scholar-practitioner manner, Human & Organizational Development (HOD) faculty members David Willis, PhD, and Richard Appelbaum, PhD, led a group of fifteen students and alumni on a field trip seminar through our nation’s capital to learn about historical and contemporary perspectives from the activists themselves. They visited activists working to secure safety in the workplace, preserve the cultural heritage of community music, and advance our standard of living.

Recent HOD graduate Karen Bogart ('13), PhD who participated in the seminar once before, said she appreciates the opportunity of hearing from individuals who are dealing with social justice from a political, advocacy or lobbying vantage point. “Having Summer Session in Washington provides a unique opportunity to draw on the diverse resources in DC that focus on social justice issues around the globe.”

“I’ve always been a believer in experiential education,” said Willis. “It’s important for me to take people out of the hotels and into the community.”

The first stop in the tour was the offices of the Workers’ Rights Consortium (WRC) where they spoke with Director Scott Nova who has been in the news recently advocating for workers’ safety in places like Bangladesh.

An international advocacy group, the WRC is “an under-resourced, hard-working organization that is making progress relative to regulations and agreements among major brands in terms of the treatment of workers in textile factories,” said Bogart, whose own personal interest lie in corporate governance.

According to Bogart, the WRC has had some success in the European Union. Ground-breaking agreements recently signed by major brands indicate progress toward oversight of safety and a greater investment in local communities.

Next, the group visited Dr. Atesh Sonneborn of the Smithsonian Folkways collection at the National Portrait Gallery which has archived a collection of American musical and cultural heritage that documents the social justice struggle. Willis characterized the Folkways collection as a sort of ministry of culture.

“What they’re doing is culture as ways of knowing and doing,” said Willis emphasizing the need to preserve individual voices which represent the struggle for justice.

“It’s really capturing the local voices and their experiences,” added Bogart.

The group also met separately with Judith Appelbaum, a Georgetown law professor and director of programs for the American Constitution Society for Law and Policy and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders. Appelbaum talked about the Snowden case, the voting rights decision of the Supreme Court, and other current judicial issues.  Sanders added a unique perspective to the day with his efforts to effect change from within our system of laws and government.

“His politics are very clear,” said Willis. “You can almost guess with 100% accuracy where he’s going to be on an issue, but he respects his colleagues and their differences.  I appreciated that because differences and diverse opinions are what this country has been built on, and so there’s a lot of value in that.”

“All our visits had unique qualities and revealed different aspects of the struggle for social justice,” said HOD student Paul Stillman. “Despite frustratingly slow progress, setbacks, and ongoing obstacles, many people are engaged and remain optimistic that change is possible.”

“I would really encourage other students and alums to participate,” said Bogart. “I do think that is one of the benefits of having the Summer Session in Washington, which is so unique and so global in its resource base that it really distinguishes itself from other locations.”

Tags: social justice, workers rights, national session, human rights

Fielding doctoral student Michael Wilson actively helping homeless

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Thu, Nov 08, 2012

Housing with health services helps homeless in Surrey, BC: Official opening November 8th, 2013

Fielding Graduate University doctoral student and Executive Director of the Phoenix Drug and Alcohol Recovery and Education Society, Michael Wilson, play active role in the project.

Phoenix HouseQuibble Creek Health and Phoenix Transition Housing Centre is a partnership between the Province, the City of Surrey and Fraser Health Authority and contains 52 supportive housing units and 15 short-term transitional recovery beds. The building includes Fraser Health’s Recovery and Assessment Centre, with 25 beds for men and women requiring 24-hour recovery and assessment services, and a primary care, substance use and mental health clinic.  

The Recovery and Assessment Centre is a safe, sheltered environment to assist individuals recovering from acute intoxication. An interdisciplinary team of professionals including nurses, substance use support workers and outreach workers care for clients and connect them with the network of mental health and substance use services available.  

Michael, currently in the HOD doctoral program at Fielding, states: “The Phoenix Society’s mission is to create a therapeutic community, which provides clients with personal, social and psychological supports at every step of their recovery process. The new building will provide an array of additional supports and opportunities for our society to better meet the needs of the population we serve. The planning process to bring this development to construction has been years in the making and I would like to thank the Province, the City of Surrey, Kwantlen Polytechnic University and Fraser Health for the resources and support provided for our current Phoenix Centre and the new Quibble Creek Health and Phoenix Transition Housing Centre.”  

Clients at the primary care, substance use and mental health clinic receive care and treatment for medical, substance use and mental health issues. The team of health-care professionals include physicians, psychiatrists, nurses, clinical counsellors and social workers. Staff provides health information and education as well as some services on an outreach basis.   

Mayor Dianne Watts, City of Surrey, BC, commented: “Since 2009, we’ve taken over 350 people off the street in Surrey and found them permanent housing, thanks to our strong partnerships with the Province and community organizations.  This new development will help our most vulnerable citizens break free from the cycle of homelessness and poverty. We are helping people build healthier lives by providing them with the supports and housing they need.”

Tags: social justice, intentional change, leadership, higher education, fielding graduate university, human rights

Fielding doctoral student Monique Morris receives Soros Justice Fellowship award

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Thu, Sep 06, 2012

Monique MorrisThe Open Society Foundations announced award of $1.5 million to a cohort of emerging and established leaders working to advance fairness and transparency in the U.S. criminal justice system, of which Fielding Graduate University doctoral student Monique Morris, is a recipient. 

The 2012 Soros Justice Fellows include investigative journalists, lawyers, academics, grassroots organizers, policy advocates, and filmmakers working on a range of justice reform issues at the local, state, and national levels.

The 2012 Soros Justice Fellows will tackle issues at the core of the Open Society Foundations’ work, such as addressing barriers that people face upon leaving prison, the harsh treatment of youth in the criminal justice system, and the impact of incarceration on communities of color. They will also be working on cutting edge reform efforts around the country, like projects to trim criminal justice costs in local jurisdictions and the role of architecture in social justice issues.  They join more than 275 other individuals who, since 1997, have received support through the Soros Justice Fellowships; and who are part of a broader Open Society Foundations effort to curb mass incarceration, eliminate harsh punishment, and ensure a fair and equitable system of justice in the United States.

Monique Morris will be researching how education related policies and practices lead to the overrepresentation of black girls in the juvenile justice system.

monique morris resized 600Monique is the CEO of the MWM Consulting Group, LLC, which advances concepts of fairness, diversity, and inclusion. She is a former Vice President for the NAACP, Director of Research and Senior Research Fellow at UC Berkeley Law School’s Thelton E. Henderson Center for Social Justice, and Senior Research Associate at the National Center on Crime and Delinquency. She is the author of Too Beautiful for Words and co‐writer of Poster Child: The Kemba Smith Story. She is also a frequent commentator and lecturer on issues pertaining to race, gender, rights, and social justice. Morris has a BA from Columbia University and an MA from Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation; and is a Doctoral student at Fielding Graduate University’s School of Educational Leadership and Change.

For more information about Monique Morris, please visit her website.

Tags: social justice, educational leadership, diversity, leadership, human rights, research funding

Fielding faculty Four Arrows recognized with Midday Star Award

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Thu, Aug 30, 2012
Four Arrows

Fielding Graduate University-School of Educational Leadership & Change (ELC) faculty member Don Trent (Four Arrows) Jacobs, PhD was the fifth person to receive the Midday Star Award since its inception in 2004.

Four Arrows recently returned from presenting at the Ontario Institute for the Study of Education at the University of Toronto, where he joined six other indigenous elders from around the world to lead the fourth Spirit Matters conference and was presented with the Midday Star Award. The award was presented in memory of George Charles, Ojibway elder and Korean War veteran, whose native name was GAZH GAD NANG, meaning Midday Star. George Charles was recognized in 2005 as one of Canada's top 14 aboriginal heroes for uniting people of all colors in peace as brothers and sisters of the global human family.

The award announcement reads:

"To Four Arrows, Wahinkpe Topa, aka Don Trent Jacobs, in recognition of his service to aboriginal communities in a variety of forms that stress inclusiveness, respect for the traditional teachings of wisdom, love, respect, courage, honesty, humility and truth, working to undo stereotypes and to walk the Good Red Road. Presented on August 26, 2012, at the Spirit Matters Conference at the Ontario Institute for the Study of Education, this plaque will be mounted for display at the Harvey Anderson Memorial Library Resource Center in Rama, Ontario, within the boundaries of the Mjikaning First Nation. Four Arrows' books are also among the first to be housed at the center."

Four Arrows with flute at ns06 resized 600Four Arrows commented: "I humbly share this to let my ELC colleagues know that indigenizing mainstream education is more and more being called into being. Edgar Mitchell, former astronaut and founder of the Institute of Noetic Science, has written, 'Only a handful of visionaries recognize the importance of Indigenous worldviews in solving the problems facing our world today'. I hope this perspective becomes a part of ELC's reputation as a result of this award."

For more information about the Spirit Matters Gathering click here.

 

Tags: globalization, educational leadership, conference, human rights

The Burbank International Film Festival honors Fielding alumna Mary Shuttleworth

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Tue, Aug 28, 2012

Mary Shuttleworth

In addition to honoring outstanding independent filmmakers in a variety of categories, The Burbank International Film Festival is also proud to honor industry icons, innovators and pioneers in the world of Art, Music and Film.

Mary Shuttleworth is the Founder and President for Youth for Human Rights International. Born and raised in South Africa, she saw first-hand the devastating effects of the lack of basic human rights, and realized that education was the long-term solution to improving conditions. She earned her Doctorate in Education from Fielding Graduate University, and in 2001 started the non-profit corporation Youth for Human Rights International (YHRI). She is the Executive Producer of the multiple award-winning music video, “United”, a series of PSA’s on human rights, and award-winning short films including “The Story of Human Rights”. Her films and PSA’s are being shown around the world on TV, Cable, and DVD, and “The Story of Human Rights” will be screening in the festival documentary shorts program. Her organization now has groups and chapters in more than 100 countries around the world. She has visited over 80 countries to promote her Human Rights Education, meeting with Kings, Presidents, Prime Ministers, and United Nations officials. The mayor of Los Angeles proclaimed “Youth for Human Rights Day” for the City of Los Angels, and the mayor of Burbank officially acknowledged her in both 2010 and 2011. Through her efforts, she has reached millions of people around the world by inspiring leadership through education. The Burbank International Film Festival is honored to present this year’s festival “Awareness Award” to Mary Shuttleworth and her son, Taron Lexton. (http://www.burbankfilmfest.org/tv-filmhonorees/)

Tags: globalization, social justice, educational leadership, international, human rights

Fielding Faculty Co-authors Book on Migration and Immigration

Posted by Carla Billings on Tue, Jun 19, 2012

Human Migration Book Cover resized 600Fielding doctoral faculty member, Dr. Christine G.T. Ho in collaboration with James Loucky,  co-authored the recently published book, Humane Migration: Establishing Legitimacy and Rights for Displaced People.

Humane Migration provides a fresh look at the debate on international migration in general and immigration to the United States, Europe and Canada in particular. Arguing that migration is a human right, the authors call for better policies that recognize these rights and the many benefits that migrants provide to their new communities. This book is an essential text for policy makers, students and activists who seek justice for the world's vulnerable populations and is available for purchase from various sellers.

Abstract:
The popular discourse on immigration in North America and Western Europe is usually framed in terms of violations of national law, fueled by fear and propped up by the myths of nationhood. The rhetoric maintains that immigrants threaten jobs, the local economy, and the cultural identity of a country. However, these views fail to consider the ironic reality: that the developed world, which tries so hard to keep poor people out, itself produces the systemic economic conditions that foster migration.

Christina Ho Fielding Faculty resized 600Dr. Ho is a doctoral faculty member in the School of Human & Organizational Development at Fielding Graduate University. Trained in social anthropology, Dr. Ho has been a professor for more than 20 years. As an anthropologist, she brings to Fielding a worldview that centers on multiculturalism and cultural diversity as well as equality and social justice.

Learn more about Dr. Ho by reading her faculty biography and Fielding story.

Tags: social justice, educational leadership, diversity, Organizational development, higher education, human rights, graduate education