Fielding Graduate University News

Jean-Pierre Isbouts to Reveal True Story of Walt Disney at Winter Session

Posted by Starshine Roshell on Tue, Jan 05, 2016

IsboutsImage.jpg

Santa Barbara residents are invited to hear Walt Disney documentarian and Fielding Graduate University faculty member Jean-Pierre Isbouts shed light on the storied and often surprising life of Disney’s founder, illustrated with excerpts from the acclaimed film Walt: The Man Behind the Myth at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 13, 2016, at the Fess Parker DoubleTree Hotel, 633 E. Cabrillo Boulevard.

Fifty years after his death, Walt Disney remains one of the most celebrated — and misunderstood — figures in popular culture.

Narrated by Dick Van Dyke and featuring interviews with luminary Ray Bradbury; stars like Robert Stack, Buddy Ebsen and Fess Parker; and animators who worked on the classic films Snow White,Pinocchio and Fantasia, the film takes an unflinching look at the man behind the world’s greatest entertainment empire.

“He was an ordinary Midwestern guy doing extraordinary things with extraordinary talent,” says Isbouts.

Between clips, he’ll share insider stories gleaned while working on the film.

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“Politically, Walt was a conservative who testified at the House Un-American Activities Committee hearings,” he says. “But from a social justice perspective, he was one of the first to hire African-American animators and to approach his workers on an equal level. These days, there are dozens of layers between the president of a studio and the worker bees — but Walt would sit with his animators and sketch.”

Isbouts teaches media and humanities at Fielding Graduate University and his public talk is part of Fielding’s winter session, when graduate students from across the country convene on the DoubleTree for seminars and workshops in media psychology, human and organizational development and more.

“Disney had a very novel way of creating an organization where people can not only produce and create but innovate,” Isbouts says. “If you don’t innovate in the 21st century, you’re going to die. You must constantly reinvent yourself, and Walt Disney is a magnificent case study of doing just that.”

Seating is limited, so all guests should arrive at the event by 6:45 p.m.

Tags: Organizational development, national session

Fielding Awards Honorary Degree to Michael B. Goldstein, JD

Posted by Hilary Molina on Mon, Aug 03, 2015

Convocation 2015 8541 mike and katrina resized 600On July 19, 2015, Fielding Graduate University President Katrina Rogers, PhD, conferred the honorary doctorate of humane letters on Michael B. Goldstein, JD, co-chair of the Higher Education practice of Cooley LLP. In awarding this distinction, Dr. Goldstein joined other honorees including globally-known educator Paolo Friere, civil rights activist Marie Fielder, renowned psychologist Bob Goulding, LGBTQ advocate Lynn Lukow and inspired educator Eddie Seashore.

During the hooding and conferral of the degree, President Rogers reflected on Dr. Goldstein’s accomplishments, “He is a pioneer in the development of the legal environment in higher education, a counselor at the highest levels of legislation, a leader in championing creative approaches to higher education and an advocate of the highest ideals of learning as a means towards a more just and sustainable future for humanity.”

Following the conferral, Dr.Goldstein delivered the commencement address to the Fielding Summer Session 2015 graduates titled “The Importance of Timing and Convergence: Learning to Love Competency Based Learning.” In his remarks, Dr. Goldstein pointed to the barriers to learning based not on time-in-seat but demonstrated competencies, proposing the creation of what he termed a “super-accreditor specifically for the purpose of reviewing and evaluating non-time-based approaches to teaching, learning and documenting competencies.”

Dr. Goldstein served a total of 23 years as a Fielding trustee, including as itsMike GoldsteinConvocation 2015 8575 resized 600 chair, before retiring from the board in 2015. In 2012, the board created the Michael B. Goldstein Endowed Board Scholarship for Dissertation Research Advancing Social Justice, in recognition of his longtime service as a trustee and distinguished leader. This scholarship supports research by Fielding doctoral candidates on topics that further the achievement of a specific aspect of social justice. President Rogers appointed Dr. Goldstein as co-chair of Fielding’s newly organized President’s Advisory Council.

Dr. Goldstein is the founder and headed the education practice at Dow Lohnes, which merged with Cooley in 2014. Dr. Goldstein is a pioneer in the development and rational regulation of online, competency based, and other nontraditional modes of learning, including the creation of innovative approaches to combining the resources of the nonprofit, public, and for-profit sectors to improve access to quality higher education. He is the 2014 recipient of WCET’s Richard Jonsen Award for leadership in e-learning and is widely recognized for his distinguished service to many higher educational organizations.

Before entering private law practice, Dr. Goldstein was Associate Vice Chancellor for Urban and Governmental Affairs and Associate Professor of Urban Sciences at the University of Illinois-Chicago. Prior to that, he was an Assistant City Administrator and the Director Of University Relations for New York City. Dr. Goldstein holds a BA from Cornell University, a JD from New York University and was a Loeb Fellow at the Graduate School of Design, Harvard University.

Tags: social justice, educational leadership, conference, Competency Based Education, leadership, Distributed education, national session, higher education, fielding graduate university, graduate education, scholar activist, scholar practitioner

Policing Black and Brown Communities: Dynamics of Race, Class and Gender

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Wed, Jul 15, 2015

Policing Black and Brown Communities: A Discussion about Dynamics of Race, Class and Gender

SS15_Ed_Series_graphic-policeIn the current national conversation about police activity and brutality, especially in low income neighborhoods of people of color, we recognize that there are intersecting issues of racial classification, economic class, as well as gender and gender expression at work on our streets. Through a panel of local experts and activists on various aspects of this situation, along with Fielding Graduate University faculty, a discussion titled Policing Black and Brown Communities: Dynamics of Race, Class and Gender will focus on the debate over the right-wrong, police-citizen, for police-against police debates to a deeper analysis. Understanding the historical relationships between identified groups (eg. racially, economically, gender-based) and law enforcement in this country can help us more clearly identify paths of action to promote social justice for all peoples, rather than demonizing them based on categorical status.

As part of its National Summer Session in Rosemont, IL, Fielding Graduate University invites the extended Chicago community to this educational discussion tonight, Wednesday, July 15, 2015 from 7–9 pm at the Westin O’Hare in Rosemont, IL. This event is free and open to the public.

GUEST PANELISTS

Monique W. Morris, EdD

monique-1Morris is an author and social justice scholar with more than 20 years of professional and volunteer experience in the areas of education, civil rights, juvenile and social justice.  Dr. Morris is the author of Black Stats: African Americans by the Numbers in the Twenty-First Century (The New Press, 2014), Too Beautiful for Words (MWM Books, 2012); and Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools (The New Press, 2016), a forthcoming book on the criminalization of Black girls in schools. She has written dozens of articles, book chapters, and other publications on social justice issues and lectured widely on research, policies, and practices associated with improving juvenile justice, educational, and socioeconomic conditions for Black girls, women, and their families.

Morris is co-founder of The National Black Women’s Justice Institute; a lecturer for Saint Mary’s College of California and an adjunct professor for the University of San Francisco. She is a 2012 Soros Justice Fellow, the former vice president for Economic Programs, Advocacy and Research at the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and the former director of Research for the Thelton E. Henderson Center for Social Justice at the UC Berkeley Law School. Morris has also worked in partnership with and served as a consultant for state and county agencies, national academic and research institutions, and communities throughout the nation to develop comprehensive approaches and training curricula to eliminate racial/ethnic and gender disparities in the justice system. Her work in this area has informed the development and implementation of improved culturally competent and gender-responsive continua of services for youth.

Morris’ research intersects race, gender, education and justice to explore the ways in which Black communities, and other communities of color, are uniquely affected by social policies. Among other publications, Morris is the author of "Representing the Educational Experiences of Black Girls in a Juvenile Court School" (Journal of Applied Research on Children, 2014); "Sacred Inquiry and Delinquent Black Girls: Developing a Foundation for a Liberative Pedagogical Praxis" (In Understanding Work Experiences from Multiple Perspectives, edited by G.D. Sardana and Tojo Thatchenkery, 2014); Educating the Caged Bird: Black Girls and the Juvenile Court School (Poverty & Race, PRRAC, 2013) and Race, Gender and the School to Prison Pipeline: Expanding Our Discussion to Include Black Girls (African American Policy Forum, 2012). Her 2008 study, A Higher Hurdle: Barriers to Employment for Formerly Incarcerated Women (UC Berkeley School of Law), which is one of the first testing studies to examine the impact of a criminal record or period of incarceration on the employment outcomes of women, was referenced in a special report commissioned by Congressman Danny K. Davis (D-IL).

Morris is a member of the OJJDP National Girls Institute Expert Panel and the California Board of State and Community Corrections’ Committee on Reducing Racial and Ethnic Disparity. She is also an advisory board member for Global Girl Media, Oakland and regular contributor to Ebony.com.

Chairty Tolliver

Tolliver is the Founder and Project Director of Black on Both Sides. A seasoned and nationally recognized youth development specialist, Tolliver grew up in the Englewood neighborhood of Chicago. She is a foster mother, writer, and spoken word artist, and former director of one of the largest and oldest organizing groups in Chicago, Southwest Youth Collaborative. In over thirteen years in the field of Youth Development, she has worked on campaigns on a broad range of issues, including fair housing, labor rights, school reform, prison reform, and LGBT youth rights. In 2012 she was selected as one of seven activists nationwide to receive the Alston Bannerman Fellowship, and is a 2013 George Soros Senior Justice Fellow. Charity identifies as a Black woman and mother, and uses feminine pronouns. She is not youth-identified, although the UN Declaration on the Rights of Youth might disagree.

Chacyln Hunt

Hunt is an attorney and police misconduct organizer in Chicago and works with youth of color and their experiences with police. Her project integrates civil rights education with research and legal strategy driven by the kids' everyday experiences with law enforcement. The students she works with participate in role plays and produce interviews with their classmates. We (a group of professionals) spend months with the kids learning from them, and helping them gain a critical distance from their experiences in order to advocate for police accountability.             

For more information about this and other Fielding Educational Series sessions, please visit fielding.edu/events.

Tags: gender empowerment, EdD, Education Doctorate, diversity, organizational change, conversation, leadership, adult learning, national session, fielding graduate university, human rights, criminal justice

5 Reasons Why Fielding Alumni Should Attend National Session 2014

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Fri, Apr 18, 2014

Get Your Fielding Fix!

Fielding Alumni, are you trying to decide if you should attend National Session this summer? Here are 5 excellent reasons why you should:

#1 Visit with your Fielding classmates and faculty, because they want to see you too!

#2 National Session is at a new location

It is with great excitement and anticipation that we would like to share the good new that summer session 2014 will take place in Rosemont (a community close to Chicago, Illinois) at the Westin O’Hare hotel. This decision based on the following values:

Student Centered Education. Based on longitudinal data, program delivery task force recommendations, and Senate Leadership Committee input about student needs regarding an appropriate site location, Debbie Lemke (Director of Academic Conference and Event Services) found a place for us that allows us to maximize learning opportunities for our students national session, while also accommodating growing needs to include IT, multiple meeting spaces, and special events. We wanted to do this wrapped in a framework of providing an accessible and affordable experience for our students. To us, this selection is consistent with our value of providing a student-centered education.

Westin WESTIN O’HARE HOTEL IN ROSEMONT, IL building photo resized 600

Social Justice.For many years, our LGBTQ and their allies have requested that we seek to find session locations in states that extend civil rights for all our community members. Although much progress has been made in the US on this important issue, this still limits the number of states where we could locate a session that was also affordable and accessible to the greatest number of students. Illinois, however, is such a state. In addition, the hotel  is located in a neighborhood with many local restaurants. As an educational institution, we seek to avoid food deserts and support locations that are connected to local resources as much as possible. Finally, we care about the affordability and value of our location choices, and being in the middle of the country, this place is both accessible and affordable for more members of our community.

Ecological Justice/Sustainability. This site location was chosen partially because if offers inexpensive public transit to many destinations, including access to downtown Chicago. It also is near a park/jogging trail, which is another component for a healthy learning environment. The Westin hotel also offers a new program partnering with New Balance running shoes that offers a pair of running shoes, socks (you get to keep the socks), and workout clothes during your stay for $5. The hotel is also working with us on basic sustainable practices, such as reducing waste, recycling, and moving to eco-friendly practices.

#3 Attend the Fielding Alumni Track sessions

thumbs up resized 600This year’s Alumni Track is packed full of intellectually stimulating topics that are relevant across all schools disciplines. The following presentations were carefully selected by the Fielding Alumni Council and are open to all alumni and students. Click here for schedule dates and times. Registration is required.

  • The Altered State of Human Experience: Conflict and communication of global religious/spiritual experiences in the digital techno-machine world with Theresa James (ELC ’13)
  • Comprehensive Evaluations of Brain Function with Ricardo Weinstein, PhD (Neuropsychology Post-Doctoral Certification ‘08)
  • Getting Back on Track: Coaching strategies to help women leaders thrive in the face of derailment with Kevin Nourse, PhD (HOD ’09) and Lynn Schmidt, PhD(HOD ’09)
  • Building Communities for Systemic Change for Authentic Racial Inclusion with Joyce A. Caldwell, PhD, (HOD ’09) and Joan M. Buccigrossi (HOD ’13) 
  • Giving Employees a Choice During a Transformation: The results with Keri Ohlrich, PhD (HOD ’11)
  • The Experience of Being a Social Justice Educator with Cheri Gurse, PhD (HOD ’13)
  • Getting Smarter, Faster with James B. Webber, PhD  (HOD ’03) and John J. Barnett, PhD (HOD ’94)
  • Integrating Three Communities of Practice as Scholar Practitioners with Anne Litwin (HOD’ 08) and Ilene Wasserman (HOD ’04)
  • Rumi’s Poetry: Journey toward meaning and transformation with Fariba Enteshari (ELC ’13)

 ALUMNI TRACK PANEL SESSIONSFielding Class

  • Lessons from Military Psychology: organizational strategy, ethics, and mental health in high-stress environment with PANELISTS: Joseph Troiani, PhD (PSY, ‘92) Stephen Redmon, PhD (HOD ‘13) Barton Buechner, PhD (HOD ‘14)          
  • Coaching Across the Fields: Uses, tips, and collaborative implementations with PANELISTS: Heidi Maston, EdD (ELC ’11,) Howard Fox, MA (HOD ’10), and John Hoover, PhD (HOD ’97)

#4 PSY CE Credits are Available

Thanks to the fine folks in the psychology department, there are TWO continuing education classes being offered at national session (Registration is required):

  • Introduction to Integrated Psychodrama: Working with the Unspoken with Judith Schoenholtz-Read, EdD
  • Writing the Professional Book/Film Review with Sherry Hatcher, PhD

Need more details? Click here.

# 5 Return to the biggest alumni party of the year! 

alumni loungeIt is that time of year where graduates who have completed their academic journey  return to national session and attend the Alumni Reception to connect, collaborate, and celebrate. Registration is required.

We hope you will take the opportunity to meet like-minded colleagues from other disciplines, build your professional network, and enjoy your time on our "virtual campus."

Alumni attend sessions and events at a discounted fee of $150. This allows access to various seminars and events scheduled by any of the three schools along with all alumni events. Registration closes promptly at 9:00 am PDT on Friday, May 2, 2014. After that date a late fee of $50 will apply.

For more information and to register, click here:  http://web.fielding.edu/events/

Tags: national session, fielding graduate university, learning

Exploring the Struggle for Social Justice in Washington DC

Posted by Marianne McCarthy on Tue, Sep 03, 2013

Fielding Graduate University Students, Faculty and Alumni Seeing Social Justice In Action

by Marianne McCarthy

During Fielding Graduate University's All School National Session, in Alexandria, VA, students, alumni, and faculty stepped into tSJ Strugglehe community to see the struggle for social justice first hand.

In a true scholar-practitioner manner, Human & Organizational Development (HOD) faculty members David Willis, PhD, and Richard Appelbaum, PhD, led a group of fifteen students and alumni on a field trip seminar through our nation’s capital to learn about historical and contemporary perspectives from the activists themselves. They visited activists working to secure safety in the workplace, preserve the cultural heritage of community music, and advance our standard of living.

Recent HOD graduate Karen Bogart ('13), PhD who participated in the seminar once before, said she appreciates the opportunity of hearing from individuals who are dealing with social justice from a political, advocacy or lobbying vantage point. “Having Summer Session in Washington provides a unique opportunity to draw on the diverse resources in DC that focus on social justice issues around the globe.”

“I’ve always been a believer in experiential education,” said Willis. “It’s important for me to take people out of the hotels and into the community.”

The first stop in the tour was the offices of the Workers’ Rights Consortium (WRC) where they spoke with Director Scott Nova who has been in the news recently advocating for workers’ safety in places like Bangladesh.

An international advocacy group, the WRC is “an under-resourced, hard-working organization that is making progress relative to regulations and agreements among major brands in terms of the treatment of workers in textile factories,” said Bogart, whose own personal interest lie in corporate governance.

According to Bogart, the WRC has had some success in the European Union. Ground-breaking agreements recently signed by major brands indicate progress toward oversight of safety and a greater investment in local communities.

Next, the group visited Dr. Atesh Sonneborn of the Smithsonian Folkways collection at the National Portrait Gallery which has archived a collection of American musical and cultural heritage that documents the social justice struggle. Willis characterized the Folkways collection as a sort of ministry of culture.

“What they’re doing is culture as ways of knowing and doing,” said Willis emphasizing the need to preserve individual voices which represent the struggle for justice.

“It’s really capturing the local voices and their experiences,” added Bogart.

The group also met separately with Judith Appelbaum, a Georgetown law professor and director of programs for the American Constitution Society for Law and Policy and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders. Appelbaum talked about the Snowden case, the voting rights decision of the Supreme Court, and other current judicial issues.  Sanders added a unique perspective to the day with his efforts to effect change from within our system of laws and government.

“His politics are very clear,” said Willis. “You can almost guess with 100% accuracy where he’s going to be on an issue, but he respects his colleagues and their differences.  I appreciated that because differences and diverse opinions are what this country has been built on, and so there’s a lot of value in that.”

“All our visits had unique qualities and revealed different aspects of the struggle for social justice,” said HOD student Paul Stillman. “Despite frustratingly slow progress, setbacks, and ongoing obstacles, many people are engaged and remain optimistic that change is possible.”

“I would really encourage other students and alums to participate,” said Bogart. “I do think that is one of the benefits of having the Summer Session in Washington, which is so unique and so global in its resource base that it really distinguishes itself from other locations.”

Tags: social justice, workers rights, national session, human rights