Fielding Graduate University News

Jean-Pierre Isbouts to Reveal True Story of Walt Disney at Winter Session

Posted by Starshine Roshell on Tue, Jan 05, 2016

IsboutsImage.jpg

Santa Barbara residents are invited to hear Walt Disney documentarian and Fielding Graduate University faculty member Jean-Pierre Isbouts shed light on the storied and often surprising life of Disney’s founder, illustrated with excerpts from the acclaimed film Walt: The Man Behind the Myth at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 13, 2016, at the Fess Parker DoubleTree Hotel, 633 E. Cabrillo Boulevard.

Fifty years after his death, Walt Disney remains one of the most celebrated — and misunderstood — figures in popular culture.

Narrated by Dick Van Dyke and featuring interviews with luminary Ray Bradbury; stars like Robert Stack, Buddy Ebsen and Fess Parker; and animators who worked on the classic films Snow White,Pinocchio and Fantasia, the film takes an unflinching look at the man behind the world’s greatest entertainment empire.

“He was an ordinary Midwestern guy doing extraordinary things with extraordinary talent,” says Isbouts.

Between clips, he’ll share insider stories gleaned while working on the film.

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“Politically, Walt was a conservative who testified at the House Un-American Activities Committee hearings,” he says. “But from a social justice perspective, he was one of the first to hire African-American animators and to approach his workers on an equal level. These days, there are dozens of layers between the president of a studio and the worker bees — but Walt would sit with his animators and sketch.”

Isbouts teaches media and humanities at Fielding Graduate University and his public talk is part of Fielding’s winter session, when graduate students from across the country convene on the DoubleTree for seminars and workshops in media psychology, human and organizational development and more.

“Disney had a very novel way of creating an organization where people can not only produce and create but innovate,” Isbouts says. “If you don’t innovate in the 21st century, you’re going to die. You must constantly reinvent yourself, and Walt Disney is a magnificent case study of doing just that.”

Seating is limited, so all guests should arrive at the event by 6:45 p.m.

Tags: Organizational development, national session

In Memory of Fielding Leader Frank Friedlander: A Mentor and Leader with Heart

Posted by Hilary Molina on Mon, Nov 02, 2015

Frank Friedlander

"Frank was a forthright, inquisitive, caring consultant, mentor and was one of my favorite humans...

We worked together for fifteen years jointly running consulting skills workshops every Winter and Summer Session, and invariably he would challenge and console our participants to do the best consulting that the situation allowed. Old fashioned problem solving and challenging his clients and their counselors/coaches was his marker, and he did it with warmth and sensitivity. I miss Frank - he was one of a kind and to me, the penultimate scholar/practitioner."

-Don Bushnell, PhD, Faculty Emeritus and Founding Dean and of the School of Human and Organizational Development, Fielding Graduate University

Frank Friedlander passed away on October 1, 2015 after a brief and relatively painless illness. He felt that he had had a long and rich life, and was quite accepting that it was about to end. He was 88 years old.

Frank was born in South Orange, New Jersey on September 22, 1927. He was always interested in people and why they did what they did. He graduated from Cornell University with a bachelor's degree in psychology in 1950 and went on to earn an MBA from the University of Texas in 1956. Frank then moved to Cleveland, Ohio, and went to Western Reserve University and earned his PhD in social and organizational psychology in 1962.

In 1954 he married Janet Mongan and they raised three children: Todd, Clare and Paul. The marriage ended in 1977. In 1996, he married Margaret Waters, who was his partner for the remainder of his life.

After leaving Western Reserve University with his PhD, Frank began his organization development career. In 1962 the family moved to China Lake, California where he worked at the Naval Ordnance Test Center. While there, he did research on how effective teams worked together.

In the fall of 1966, Frank and his family moved back to Cleveland, Ohio where he joined the faculty of the newly begun Organizational Behavior PhD program at Case Institute of Technology. It was the first program of its kind in the world. For the next 15 years, he taught, consulted, wrote and worked with students on their PhD dissertations. The organizational behavior program was unique at the time in that the students and faculty were considered colleagues - there was not hierarchy of faculty having all of the answers and students being in a constant learning mode - they were all equal colleagues in a rich learning environment. Frank fit in very well in this role because of his values around respect, encouragement, and striving for colleagueship with his fellow faculty and the students with whom he came in contact. He "walked the talk" and was a profound role model for many in the University and his clients.

In 1981, Frank left what is now Case Western Reserve University (the two universities joined in 1968) to join the faculty at the Fielding Graduate University in Santa Barbara, California, where he continued his work as an outstanding faculty member working with students from around the world. During his tenure at Fielding, Frank conducted frequent seminars on organizational development, and consulted in collaboration with Fielding doctoral students who served as "shadow consultants" with nonprofit organizations throughout the U.S. In 2005, Frank and Don Bushnell, PhD, the founding dean of the School of Organization Development, founded the Center for Study of Nonprofit Organizations which became the Institute for Social Innovation at Fielding. Throughout his twenty-five years as senior faculty, he guided the doctoral research initiatives and mentored thirty-five candidates for advanced study at Fielding.

During his teaching career, Frank also was an active member of the Organizational Development Network and was a frequent presenter at their annual conventions. He was also a member of the National Training Laboratories where he led groups of individuals to help them identify their strengths and areas of development as leaders and human beings.

In his later years, Frank was an active member of the Humanist Community and a founding member of the Ethical Culture Society of Silicon Valley in 2006, where he offered valuable organizational support. He led workshops and seminars, led board retreats, and mentored other founders. He was passionate about bringing "heart" into Humanism, which he felt tends towards the "heady." He often talked and wrote in the last few years about how technology made us less connected instead of more connected, and how the loss of human contact in communication left the feelings out of our relationships, which he considered a big loss. Frank always valued and encouraged real and significant interactions with those around him.

Frank made many intellectual and academic contributions over the course of a long and illustrious career. For many years he was a national leader in the study of organizations and in the field of Organization Development. Within HOD he helped develop the systems knowledge area and ran a long-standing and admired consulting skills workshop with founding dean Don Bushnell. His style was one of practical problem solving with a strong dose of challenge for his clients. He value planned agendas for meetings and workshops but successfully co-facilitated with those who had a more improvisational style. Frank was a master at simultaneously tending to content and group process. He was also a notably competitive tennis player.
Frank’s Fielding colleagues speak of his many helpful contributions to their personal and professional development. While his wisdom was highly valued, he sometimes questioned the quality of his own work as well as sought help from others. For example, while he offered guidance for fellow faculty members on how to run a doctoral committee or faculty meeting, he also would ask for advice on how to give feedback on problematic student writing. He was a mentor who always sought improvement. Because of his many talents others sought his endorsement. To quote one colleague, “Do you remember the way he would say, ‘YES!!' when he agreed with you? I do."
Frank was shy and introverted despite an often forthright and inquisitive style when in work role. A person of many facets, colleagues describe him as humble, gentle, kind, inclusive, and nourishing.  He managed to overcome his shyness in several ways including performing at national sessions as one of the HOD Spandex Dancers (you would have to witness it to understand). Frank Friedlander is most fondly remembered and dearly missed.
-Charles McClintock, PhD, School of Human and Organizational Development Professor and Dean Emeritus, Fielding Graduate University
Frank was one of those rare individuals, whether in conversation, over a meal, or in a formal seminar, left others mulling over a challenging idea and filled with the acknowledgement of having been heard. Over the years, I saw him push others--his students, colleagues, friends-- and me, to think more deeply, to pose more critical questions, and to reflect on our assumptions. Passionate about organization development and leadership, he advocated tirelessly for creating organizations that honor the development of the people who work within them. We miss him, but he is always with us at Fielding as he was committed to the way we think about learning and the way we work with our students.
-Katrina S. Rogers, PhD, President, Fielding Graduate University

 

If you would like to share any memories of Frank, please post them on Facebook>Frank Friedlander>public group, or e-mail inmemoryoffrankf@gmail.com

 

Tags: Organizational development, fielding graduate university, human development, PhD, Frank Friedlander, institute for social innovation, katrina rogers

Fielding Signs Partnership Agreement With the University of the Virgin Islands

Posted by Hilary Molina on Wed, Aug 19, 2015

Fielding Graduate University is partnering with the University of the Virgin Islands (UVI) who also reached agreements with the University of St. Maarten, Philipsburg, St. Maarten; the Council of Community Colleges of Jamaica, Kingston, Jamaica; Nantong University, China; Yangzhou University, China; and the University of Nebraska at Omaha.

UVI MOU Fielding

 

Photo courtesy of University of the Virgin Islands

Back row left to right: Dr. Orlando Taylor, Fielding VP of Strategic Initiatives; Dr. Linda Thomas, UVI Dean, School of Education; Dr. James S. Maddirala, UVI Associate Provost for Graduate, Global and Academic Affairs; Dr. Stephen Reames, UVI Dean, School of Business; Dr. Dorothy Agger-Gupta, Program Director, Fielding School of Human & Organizational Development ; Dr. Habtes Yegin, UVI Professor of Education. Front row left to right: Dr. Camille McKayle, UVI Provost; Dr. David Hall, UVI President ; Dr. Katrina Rogers, Fielding President; Dr. Linda Honold, Chair, Fielding Board of Trustees.

Each of the agreements, known as memoranda of understanding (MOU), are unique and share a spirit of cooperation and understanding. UVI’s MOU with Fielding is intended to establish mutually beneficial collaborations in academic programs, research, the pursuit of grants, continuing education, and certificate programs. “The common goal of the MOUs is to enhance the UVI experience, either by having students from other parts of the world in the classroom here at UVI or by having UVI students sit in the classrooms around the world,” said UVI Provost Dr. Camille McKayle, “A 21st Century education needs to be a global education. UVI graduates will find themselves in work environments with people from around the world, actually and virtually. UVI aims to prepare them for that environment by giving them opportunities to see that world so that it is a less daunting place.”

The general objective of the agreement with Fielding is to engage in long-term collaboration in fields that are compatible with the orientation and expertise of each institution. The MOU provides for possible collaborations involving a PhD collaborative program in leadership with agreed upon credits transferable from one institution to the other. This collaboration will target, though not exclusively, Fielding’s Schools of Human and Organizational Development and School of Education Leadership for Change. Students will be able to study several concentrations including, academic leadership, political leadership, ecological justice leadership and health leadership.

According to the MOU other possible collaborations include:

  • Joint courtesy/adjunct faculty appointments to support PhD degree programs at each institution
  • Faculty exchanges
  • Continuing education opportunities on selected topics
  • Faculty development in competency based education and/or prior learning assessments
  • Faculty development and technical support in instructional design
  • Joint research activity in areas of mutual interest and expertise
  • Joint applications for external grants in areas of mutual interest and expertise
  • Possible establishment of a formal center or institute on leadership and diversity to house Fielding/UVI activity possibly in conjunction with Fielding’s Institute for Social Innovation or Fielding’s new Marie Fielder Center on Democracy, Leadership and Education.
  • Joint marketing and student recruitment domestically and internationally
  • Periodic Fielding residencies in the Virgin Islands; UVI residencies in Santa Barbara, CA

The MOU is for three years with an automatic renewal unless terminated.

Fielding Graduate University President Katrina Rogers, PhD stated, “We are honored to be working with the University of Virgin Islands to support our mutual goals to develop leadership across the globe for the complex, often difficult conditions, our graduates will face over the course of their careers.  We look forward to many years of a partnership to create effective educational offerings for students that assist them in attaining their professional goals and provide skills and knowledge for their lifetime.”

Tags: globalization, educational leadership, Organizational development, fielding faculty, Competency Based Education, Distributed education, fielding graduate university, graduate education, human development, institue for social innovation, scholar practitioner

Fielding Announces Acquisition of Organization Systems Renewal Master’s Program

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Fri, Feb 27, 2015

Fielding’s Master of Arts in Organizational Development and Leadership now offers students two unique delivery models

*PRESS RELEASE*

SANTA BARBARA, CA, FEBRUARY 26, 2015: Fielding Graduate University President Katrina Rogers, PhD, is pleased to announce the acquisition of the Organization Systems Renewal (OSR) master’s degree program. The OSR program is now being offered as a part of the Master of Arts in Organizational Development and Leadership (MA-ODL) program at Fielding Graduate University. On February 24, 2015, in Seattle, Washington, OSR and Fielding met to formally launch their agreement. Following the meeting, OSR and Fielding leadership, alumni, faculty and students gathered for an evening reception hosted by Fielding at The Mountaineers Program Center to publicly announce the new collaboration. “OSR and Fielding have followed a similar path in leading the field of organizational development, leadership, and change. We are honored that OSR has joined Fielding to continue our leadership together in promoting organizational effectiveness through systems change.” President Rogers said.

Fielding is headquartered in Santa Barbara, California, and was founded in 1974. A nonprofit leader in blended graduate education for over forty years, Fielding’s accreditation is maintained through the Accrediting Commission for Senior Colleges and Universities of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC). Fielding’s global, distributed community of professionals is dedicated to lifelong learning, social justice and innovation, and advancement for individuals, organizations, communities, and society. Fielding faculty members represent a breadth of scholarship and practice within the fields of clinical and media psychology, human and organizational development, and educational leadership.

The OSR program has conducted twenty cohorts in its 35-year history, boasting alumni presence in organizations such as Microsoft, Amazon, Starbucks, Boeing, Boys and Girls Clubs, the higher education sector as well as other private and non-profit organizations.

The OSR master’s degree program will be offered as a part of Fielding’s current MA-ODL program, which will now provide students with two unique delivery models. One model is the ODL~OSR Cohort allowing working professionals to obtain their degree through an in-depth learning experience that is highly collaborative and experiential. This model combines face-to-face interaction and online learning with faculty and peers who meet in Seattle and surrounding areas. Students complete online courses in the areas of leadership, design, group dynamics, and systems thinking, scheduled throughout five terms (20 months) beginning in the fall of each year. Students who complete this cohort model receive an emphasis in Organization Systems Renewal. The first ODL~OSR Cohort term begins in the fall of 2015.

The ODL~ Self-Directed is another model that allows working professionals who wish to achieve their educational goals by engaging with a diverse global community. This flexible model combines action inquiry, group engagement, and scholarship with praxis. The ODL~ Self-Directed model is a collaborative, in-depth learning experience with faculty and peers and includes two face-to-face residential sessions combined with online learning. Through full- or part-time participation, ODL~ Self-Directed can begin any fall, spring or summer term.

MA-ODL Program Director Marcella Benson-Quaziena, PhD, stated, “The two offerings coming together is a natural fit. The students are similar in their goals and desires, intellectual curiosity, heart and spirit.  The MA-ODL program is now comprised of two delivery models that reach a wide range of adult learners giving them a choice based on their engagement style, professional and personal commitments, and desire to integrate scholarship with practice.” 

For more information about Fielding Graduate University, please visit www.fielding.edu.

Tags: Organizational development, higher education, fielding graduate university, graduate education

Notes from Liberia: Fielding talks about Ebola

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Tue, Nov 11, 2014

Ebola: What You Need To Know and How You Can Help

Many at Fielding Graduate University have expressed compassion and concern about those suffering with Ebola and for people in the affected countries. In an effort to keep the community informed and healthy, Fielding faculty member in the School of Human & Organizational Development, David Willis, PhD, along with doctoral student and his mentee, Ammu Shittu, recently organized a webinar open to the university. This webinar was recorded and is available by clicking here: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/79672210/FGU%20Ebola%20Information%20Webinar%2010-25-14%2C%208.59%20AM.mov

ebola quaratine workersConversations between Willis and Shittu over the past several months prompted the two to take action by reaching out to the Fielding community to connect them to the current Ebola crisis. Shittu is currently in the proposal stage of this dissertation research on Ebola, which is fitting considering his knowledge and background: he is a UN worker and served on front line zones of decelerating conflict recently in Kosovo, Afghanistan and currently in East Timor, Liberia. Willis stated, "So far the county Aminu is working in, Grand Gedeh County, is Ebola-free, but they are all taking extreme precautions. What is most worrying is the collapse of the economy...The lockdown on the capital has had many repercussions."

In this first session in a series of webinars for the Fielding community about the Ebola crisis, main topics included the local situation in Liberia, West Africa, perceptions of Ebola including fears and realities, lessons learned and what is needed, followed by questions and answers from the audience.

Further discussion was led by guest speakers Elsie Karmbo, County Health Officer, Zwedru, Grand Gedeh County, Liberia, Emmanuel Bryma Momoh, Human Rights Officer, UN Field Office, Zwedru, Grand Gedeh County, Liberia, and Fielding faculty member Marie Farrell, PhD, Fielding Graduate University.

To listen to the webinar: click here: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/79672210/FGU%20Ebola%20Information%20Webinar%2010-25-14%2C%208.59%20AM.mov


In a message to the Fielding community from President Katrina Rogers and the Fielding Human Resources Office, following information was provided:

Both the President’s office and human resources have received inquiries about Ebola in the last several days. Many of you have expressed compassion and concern about those suffering with Ebola and for people in the affected countries. Our hearts are with them under what must be very difficult circumstances. We would like to give you some additional information given the extensive media coverage of the Ebola outbreak:

  • The U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) urges all U.S. residents to avoid nonessential travel to Liberia, Guinea, and Sierra Leone. The CDC is not currently recommending that travelers avoid visiting other African countries. According to the CDC, Ebola is a very low risk for most travelers, who can protect themselves by avoiding sick people and hospitals in West Africa where patients with Ebola are being treated.
  • Ebola is a viral disease that is spread through direct contact with the blood or other bodily fluids — such as urine, saliva, sweat, or vomit — of an infected person who is showing symptoms of the disease, or from contact with objects like needles that have been contaminated with the virus.
  • Symptoms of Ebola include fever (higher than 101.5°F), severe headache, muscle pain, weakness, diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and bleeding or bruising.
  • In the U.S., those people at the greatest risk of infection from exposure in the workplace are health care workers. For all other American workplaces, travelers returning from one of the affected countries are at greatest risk.
  • The affected countries have been asked to conduct exit medical screenings of all persons at international airports, seaports and major land crossings for illness consistent with potential Ebola infection. Effective October 22, travelers from the three affected West African countries will be permitted to enter the U.S. through only five U.S. airports (Atlanta, Chicago-O’Hare, Newark Liberty, New York JFK, and Washington-Dulles), where incoming passengers from the affected region undergo medical screening.
  •  The symptoms of Ebola are, of course, similar to those of many other illnesses, so as flu season approaches, we’d like to take this opportunity to urge all of you to consider getting a flu shot, and to stay home if you do become ill. If you report to work sick, your supervisor may send you home to rest and recover. Frequent hand-washing and other basic hygiene practices are useful techniques to minimize the threat of transmitting infections.
If you have additional concerns or questions about Ebola, the following websites are available:

FAQ – Ebola, About the Disease - http://www.msf.org/article/faq-ebola-about-disease

CDC – Centers for Disease Control - http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/index.html

WHO – Global Alert and Response - http://www.who.int/csr/disease/ebola/en/

Liberia: Working with Communities Is the Key to Stopping Ebola  http://www.who.int/features/2014/liberia-stopping-ebola/en/

Stopping Ebola with Public Health Expertise, not Casual Advice http://www.huffingtonpost.com/linda-p-fried/stopping-ebola-with-publi_b_5989626.html

Major Aid Organizations

http://www.msf.org/search?keyword=ebola

http://www.directrelief.org/emergency/2014-west-africa-ebola-outbreak/

http://www.savethechildren.org/site/c.8rKLIXMGIpI4E/b.6115947/k.8D6E/Official_Site.htm

 

 


Tags: Organizational development, fielding graduate university, human development

Becoming a Leader: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Study of the Lifeworld of Nelson Mandela

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Tue, Oct 07, 2014

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Fielding alumna Shirley Knobel, PhD (HOD '14), was selected as the Overall Award Winner of the Student Research Colloquium as a part of the 2014 Organization Development Network Annual Conference based on her paper titled "Becoming a Leader: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Study of the Lifeworld of Nelson Mandela"

INTRODUCTION

My research question emerged from my lived experience of Nelson
Mandela. I had the privilege of knowing him personally through the Nelson Mandela Children’s Fund – a charity that Mandela established during his term of office as President of South Africa. I selected the lifeworld of Nelson Mandela as the subject of my PhD dissertation research because in my experience he demonstrated an unparalleled ability to lead, reconcile, and transform a broken society.

This dissertation study looks at the lived experience of Nelson Mandela and explores how the structures of his lifeworld shaped his choices and actions and ultimately influenced his destiny as a leader. This approach required a broad lens that encompasses the three main concepts underlying the inquiry: leadership, lifeworld phenomenology, and hermeneutics. While the leadership literature is relevant to this study, so too is lifeworld phenomenology, and in particular Alfred Schutz’s theory regarding the structures of the lifeworld and its significance for social action (Schutz & Luckmann, 1973).

Click here to read Knobel's paper: Becoming a Leader: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Study of the Lifeworld of Nelson Mandela

#FieldingAlumni

Tags: organizational change, Organizational development, fielding graduate university, graduate education

Dreams of Fielding: New England Cluster Celebrates 13 Years

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Thu, Mar 13, 2014

 Helping People Change Through Dreamwork

The New England cluster celebrated thirteen years of gatherings by inviting Alice Kitchel (HOD '12) and Beth Scanzani of Dream Coach of Rockport, MA, to speak to the group about dreamwork. Special guest President Katrina Rogers also attended to discuss dreaming of Fielding's future.

Reported by Jim Webber, PhD (HOD '03)

President Rogers bonew england visitwled us over on her visit to the Fielding New England alumni group on Saturday, February 8, in Gloucester, MA. The view from host Rick Maybury’s (HOD '12) office on the waterfront was spectacular and snow-free for a change.

Present were HOD folks: Carolyn Slocombe, Kathleen Healey, Alice Kitchel, Peg Murphy, Rick Maybury, Jim Goebelbecker, Jim Webber, Leo Johnson (emeritus) and special guest Beth Scanzani.

Katrina presented her ideas and directions for raising the value of Fielding Graduate University, in other words in building our brand. Our core identity is centered on mentored transformational learning, relational learning, life-long learning, and value based education. Fielding stands for innovation in graduate education. We need to embrace new ways of thinking. Because the world needs us we must think in terms of global social systems and the future of the earth.

Change Through Dreamwork

"Dreams do work so get to work on your dreams" urged practitioners Alice Kitchel and Beth Scanzani. Dreams help us solve problems and preview future challenges. Dreams serve as a magic mirror, a secret laboratory and a creative studio. Our brain has two operating systems, one for “reality,” one for our own unfolding dreamscape. In waking life, we combine letters and words to form sentences. In dreams we combine images to spell-out associations and create a story or even a nightmare. Dreams are like having a resident life coach who knows you from inside out.

To learn from a dream you must engage with it. The process of successful “dream catching” includes: creating a record, writing the story in present tense, giving it a title, drawing-out connections, applying dream work tools and looking for themes, surprises and limiting beliefs. 

To apply this learning, we used the projective team process on a brave cluster mate’s dream. First the dreamer gave the dream a title and second she told the dream. In the third step the group asks clarifying questions followed by their own “hits,” projections and associations answering the question, “If this were my dream.” Finally the dreamer shares her hits and reactions and decides how she would like to honor the dream.

Dream we must!

Rick Maybury’s message to Katrina following the visit:

I want to thank you from all of our alums for your thoughtful and enriching visit. We are all pleased that you took the time and energy to join us and your interactions could not have been more authentic or inspiring. As I had mentioned in the meeting, it is refreshing and provides hope that the President is finally having what most of us believe to be the right conversation.

Your presentation on the state of the state, including your vision, was well balanced with reality and hope. The group also felt you authentically listened to our perspectives which would be sincerely considered in your future leadership decisions. As I hope you gathered, there are no more dedicated, passionate and devoted to the spirit of Fielding and it potential to have profound transformational impacts on its students.

Tags: Organizational development, higher education, fielding graduate university, human development

1974-2014: Fielding Graduate University Celebrates 40 Years

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Mon, Mar 03, 2014

40th Anniversary LOGO resized 600

Founded in March 1974 in Santa Barbara, CA, The Fielding Institute (now Fielding Graduate University) Celebrates its 40th Year in Higher Education

Fielding Graduate University is the realization of the vision of three founders: Frederic Hudson, Hallock Hoffman, and Renata Tesch. The founders, all distinguished higher education administrators and educators, in their respective capacities as president, executive vice-president, and dean of education, each contributed an essential ingredient to the establishment of the university. Many other key individuals, through their diligence, hard work, and firm belief in the national need for mid-career professional education, gave substance to the dream.

The founders envisioned a nationally recognized graduate school, which would serve mid-careerFounders Photo professionals who wanted to pursue an advanced degree but whose educational and professional objectives could not be met by traditional institutions of higher education. The founders succeeded in their mission. Their success was predicated on two basic, but at the time, rather advanced notions. First, they recognized that changing demographics were altering the nature of society, particularly the world of higher education.

More often than not, the founders speculated, students seeking advanced degrees would be mid-career adults who wanted to enhance their established academic and professional skills; who, in many cases, would be committed to effecting a mid-life career change; and all of whom, by the nature of their quest for a quality graduate education at mid-life, would be interested in being part of a lifelong learning community.

Second, the founders realized that adults learn new tasks and accrue knowledge in ways that differ significantly from those of adolescents and young adults. The traditional pedagogical method of education - active teacher, passive learner - would not be appropriate to this new experiment in adult professional education. To accommodate and capitalize upon the learning styles of its student, Fielding developed a rigorous, supportive learning model that today remains flexible, adult-centered, self-directed, task-oriented, and competence-based.

In the Fielding archives, an original document  written by founder Frederic Hudson outlines the beginning of Fielding's history:

History and Background of The Fielding Institute

Fielding was founded in March 1974, as a graduate school in education and psychology designed to serve the educational interests of professional persons in mid-career.  Fielding is new, small, and specialized. We chose two fields in which neither buildings nor equipment are especially important, in which our fascination with human beings and their learning, feeling and knowing could be the focus of our attention. We made our programs “external”—not to be carried on in our environment, but to be accomplished by our Students in connection with their own lives and work, in their own surroundings.

Fielding serves a distinct population: mature professional persons in mid-career. We aim to assist intelligent, competent adults to attain goals of their own, and to measure their achievements by their own increases in competence and knowledge.

Frederic Hudson and Hallock Hoffman first met on a committee established by the Western College Association to advise a study on the meaning of baccalaureate degrees. Subsequently, Frederic Hudson became associated with Laurence University, an external graduate program school. Dr. Hudson, asked Hallock Hoffman and Renata Tesch to join him as faculty members...Resigning from Laurence, we set up Fielding, in part to satisfy our desires to create a program of which we could be proud, and in part to fulfill our responsibilities to a group of students who had been studying with us at Laurence and who were in danger of being stranded by our departure.

Several of those students joined us by enrolling during the founding period of Fielding; their support enabled us to become a functioning school in a much shorter time than would otherwise have been possible. 19 of these students so far have graduated, because they were already at an advanced stage in their studies (with us as their program supervisors)when they entered the Fielding program. Of subsequent students who enrolled initially in Fielding, 10 Master of Arts students and 11 doctoral students have graduated.

The Institute was organized as a non-profit educational corporation in California in March, 1974. We obtained state and federal tax exemption shortly thereafter. We raised the necessary capital and completed the requirements for (a)(3)recognition under the then California education code in July, 1974. Since licensing is important for many of our psychology Students, we applied for and were successful in obtaining (a)(2) Approved status under the State Board of Education in July, 1975.(“Approved status” is now described by California Education Code 94310(b)). Our graduates are now eligible to be examined for the state licenses that may be obtained with “approved” school education. This includes the license as psychologist under the Psychology Examining Committee of the Board of Medical Examiners and the license for Marriage, Family and Child Counselors, from the Board of Behavioral Science Examiners, both of California. Some state agencies, however, are governed by laws that limit their licenses to graduates of “accredited”schools, and for such students, Fielding is presently not serviceable.

Our first students were enrolled in the Education Program. Our individual learning contract curriculum was different from Laurence’s traditional curriculum; but the Laurence transfer students were able to continue the studies they had begun within our Education Program. The Master of Arts Program had its first admission in the summer of 1974. The Psychology Program enrolled its first Students in the fall of 1974. The MA Plan 3 Program, a program to prepare enrollees for admission to the Psychology Doctoral Program, was initiated in 1976. At that same time, we began discussing the possibility of a cooperative program in Human Development with Pacific Oaks College. These discussions led to the present program in which Students in our Education Program can specialize in Human Development, taking course work from, doing research with, and being for some purposes supervised by the faculty of Pacific Oaks College. The first Students enrolled in this program in 1977. A smaller cooperative program with the REM Institute of Cleveland, Ohio, enables REM Students to enroll simultaneously in our MA plan 3 program, and permits them to use the REM faculty as Field Faculty Advisors, teachers and trainers. Student first enrolled in the MA program in 1976.

We did not raise any sizable amount of money in connection with founding Fielding. From the beginning we have believed that the Institute should support itself from current tuition income. The capitalization necessary for (a)(3) recognition was developed through a generous gift of educational films from the Encyclopedia Britannica Educational Corporation. The founding officers drew no salaries for the first several months and only partial salaries for the following year. We have been on full salary since September 1975, and in March 1976, the Focus MagazineTrustees agreed that Fielding’s income was now sufficient to begin paying some of the officers’ salaries previously deferred. About half of this, the Corporation’s only debt, has now been paid.

The financial success of Fielding is thus a function of its ability to serve its students; and that equation is one we wish to preserve. We think it is healthy for us to be delivering educational services in exchange for payment; we do not want capital or endowment that would enable us to shift our primary attention away from services to students. We are creating reserves that ultimately will equal one year’s budget.

The financial success of Fielding is a direct outcome of the number of our enrollments. These have grown steadily, in accord with careful plans.

 

 

To read more about the history of Fielding through the stories of faculty and alumni, click here to view the special edition of FOCUS Magazine: Fielding Graduate University Special Edition: FOCUS Magazine

If you would like to receive a copy of Focus Magazine, please email your name and address to alumnirelations@fielding.edu.

Tags: educational leadership, psychology, organizational change, Organizational development, fielding graduate university, graduate education, distance education

Fielding Graduate University Representing at the OD Network Annual Conference 2013

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Mon, Oct 07, 2013

Fielding Graduate University is Representing in Full Force at the OD Network 2013 Annual Conference in San Jose, CA

ODNETWORK 574x180 WB2013

Find Fielding Graduate University at

OD Network!

Innovating is at the core of everything as an Organization Development professional - and this year, it's also the

 inspiration for the OD Network 2013 Annual Conference

This year's conference theme of "Innovating" showcases the constant development and continual pursuit of the best solutions that motivate OD professionals.

Be sure to stop by our Fielding Graduate University booth (#9 and 10) to learn about our latest offerings for OD professionals!

Fielding Gathering TONIGHT

**Monday Oct. 7th at 6:30pm**

Stop by the Fielding booth for location and more information.

Fielding in Action

Fielding faculty, students, and alumni are everywhere!

To view full program: click here

Monday, October 7

The Art of Hosting: Nurturing and Cultivating Community in Organizational and Academic Life

Current Fielding Student Trevor Maber, B.Comm., M.A., CHRP, Assistant Professor, Edwards School of Business, University of Saskatchewan

Dialogic OD in Day-to-Day Complexity 
Fielding Alumnus Keith Ray, PhD, Director of Research, Act Too Consulting, Inc. and Co-Speaker: Fielding Alumna Joan Goppelt, PhD, Act Too Consulting, Inc.

Tuesday, October 8

Power in the Network: Using Internal Networks to Increase Collaboration Across Communities
Fielding Alumna Joan Goppelt, PhD, Director of Practice, Act Too Consulting, Inc. and Fielding Alumnus Keith Ray, PhD, Co-Founder, Act Too Consulting, Inc.

Innovating Performance Management through the Use-of-Self
Fielding Alumna Mary Jean Vignone, PhD, SVP Learning & Development, Santa Barbara Bank & Trust

Cross-Functional Teaming Through the Lenses of Differences : W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Case Study

Fielding Alumna Gail Sacconey Townsend, PhD, Organization Development Specialist and Higher Education Professor, W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc.

Ready to catch up with some old friends and make

new ones at OD Network Conference!

#ODN13 #FieldingAlumni @fieldinggraduat http://bit.ly/W6i23O

 

 


Tags: Organizational development, conference, fielding graduate university

Current Fielding Student, Sam Jama, Featured as Super Scholar by Ryerson University

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Fri, Aug 23, 2013
Article written my Vanessa Santilli of Ryerson University:

Sam Jama is a case study in time management. A senior analyst (compliance) for the provincial government, he is also pursuing a PhD in Human and Organizational Development at Fielding Graduate University...


To view full article about Sam Jama, click here: Ryerson University Magazine Summer 2013

Sam Jama

Tags: Organizational development, higher education, fielding graduate university, graduate education, human development