Fielding Graduate University News

Fielding's Media Psychology Program Leaves an Impression on Digital Hollywood

Posted by Hilary Molina on Wed, Nov 04, 2015
 by Tunisha Singleton, MA - Current PhD Student | Fielding Graduate University | Co-Chair - APA Div 46 Student Committee |  Member - APA Div 46, 47 | http://www.linkedin.com/pub/tunisha-singleton/85/43a/a82

tunisha_digital_hollywood.jpg

Fielding Graduate University made their presence felt at Digital Hollywood in Marina Del Rey, California. Digital Hollywood is a reputable conference in the convergence of entertainment and technology, bringing together the field’s top executives and developers. As a sponsor of the four-day summit, Fielding Graduate University’s Media Psychology program supportively added to the event by bringing fresh perspectives and specialists in cutting-edge fields.

digital_hollywood_hogg_and_rutledge.jpgDigital Hollywood is among the world’s best venues combining technology research and design. The setting became a perfect fit for media psychology’s scholar-practitioner model that aims to understand the psychological impact of media use and creation. Over 25 members of Fielding's media psychology community were present, including prospective and current students, alumni, and faculty.

Director of the Media Psychology PhD Program Jerri Lynn Hogg, PhD, was in attendance and noted that the overall experience was beneficial for both parties. “Patterns in media and new technology emerged in many of the panel discussions,” said Dr. Hogg. “While industry experts work to figure out how to use content and make new platforms, researchers from our program can provide this type of information by explaining the psychology behind it. So it was very energizing to connect industry developers with researchers.”

Digital Hollywood is broken up into multiple tracks emphasizing a particular area within entertainment and technology. A few tracks, for example, include: “Immersive Entertainment: From Movie Theatres to Interactive Surfaces," “The Women’s Summit & Festival: Content, Discussion, & Recognition,” and “Virtual and Augmented Reality: From Sense of Presence to Full Embodiment.” Panels are designed to focus on a specific topic under each theme with speakers who have exceled in that particular field. And representatives from Media Psychology were not only in attendance, but were also called to lead as pioneering examples.

Director of the Media Psychology Masters and Certificate Program, Garry Hare, PhD, moderated a panel titled “AR – VR and the Human Brain: The Impact of Neuromarketing on the Real-Time Design of Immersive Entertainment and Advertising Productions.” Exploring the cognitive science behind the visualization of complex data offered opportunities to showcase the innovative work of Media Psychology graduates.

“Students and faculty experience first hand innovations in immersive media, augmented reality and the future of both mass market and targeted productions,” said Dr. Hare. “Presentations by faculty on media neuroscience and the creation of AR applications were extremely well received, opening the door for future featured panels, presentations, Dr._Christophe_Morin.jpgreal-time research and collaborative product development.”

Leading the way on marketing neuroscience is Fielidng media psychology faculty member Christophe Morin, PhD, whose presentation was filled with stimulating and cutting-edge information that rang new to Digital Hollywood. As CEO of neuromarking agency SalesBrain, Dr. Morin believes that the psychology of neuromarketing is indispensable to the Digital Hollywood community. “The field of neuromarketing offers research methods that measure and predict the effect of media on our nervous system” said Dr. Morin. “I was pleased to see that content producers and marketers are very interested in the field of media neuroscience because our research can explain and predict the effect of advertising, games, and even movies on the brain.”

Interest in neuromarketing and other critical areas were expressed through the consistent flow of attention received at Fielding’s interactive information booth. Maintained over the course of the entire conference, faculty and alumni were able to showcase Fielding’s Media Psychology’s new certificate program with two new specialized concentrations - Media Neuroscience or Brand Psychology and Audience Engagement. Under each specialized focus, the three-course certificate allows industry professionals to gain an understanding of the "why" and "how" behind their work by applying psychological theory.

Fielding media psychology faculty member and Director of the Media Psychology Research Center Pamela Rutledge, PhD, spent several hours interacting with Digital Hollywood’s advertising and creative professionals about the new emphasis of Brand Psychology. “This certificate is designed to help you connect with the consumer and take advantage of the socially-connected, 24/7 world we live in,” said Dr. Rutledge. “Entertainment and technology is not just about the tools...it’s about human behavior. Media environments change. New technologies emerge. But human needs and goals do not. So here you’ll learn to apply psychology to develop and deliver a brand identity and core story that captures your audience’s wants.”

For the Fielding to sponsor Digital Hollywood, several positive outcomes can arise including careers for alumni, research projects for faculty and internships for current students. Third year media psychology doctorl student Matthew Price remarked on how significant it is for Fielding to be present at these events and how valuable it was to be in attendance, “Digital Hollywood was a terrific opportunity for me to network with industry luminaries and examine my place academically and professionally in a real world setting. I think this is one of the truest benefits of an education from Fielding; exposure to the industry and an opportunity to apply our education in a constructive environment."

The Fielding community received an overall enthusiastic reception from Digital Hollywood participants with high anticipation for returning to the next seasonal event. Taking advantage of the high profile opportunity provided by Digital Hollywood’s setting, faculty and alum showcased their unique approach to methodology, production research, and content creation. Doctoral, masters, and certificate programs alike - the Media Psychology program represented Fielding Graduate University well as a formidable leader in higher education, research, and applied innovation.

 

 

 

Tags: Media psychology, technology, psychology, fielding faculty, social media, digital learning, Distributed education, fielding graduate university, distance education, APA Div 46, PhD

Fielding's New Media Psychology Program Director Jerri Lynn Hogg, PhD On Media Psychology and Technology for Good

Posted by Hilary Molina on Wed, Oct 14, 2015

As president of the American Psychological Association’s Division 46-Society for Media Psychology and Technology, Jerri Lynn Hogg, PhD, now takes on the role as program director of media psychology at Fielding Graduate University.

Jerri Lynn HoggDr. Hogg stepped right into her new role with ease. Coming from years of grounded experience in both academic and professional settings, her teaching experience at a variety of post-secondary organizations, along with her numerous years of involvement in the media psychology program at Fielding, Dr. Hogg is poised and ready to drive media psychology further into the educational forefront of the 21st century. Dr. Hogg's vision of the future of media psychology as a disciple was clearly outlined during her interview for the position of director:

The future of media psychology is impacted by the psychological foundations which form the building blocks of this discipline. These building blocks are what separate us from big media studies departments and other educational areas that hover in the same research space as media psychology. Media psychology is a broad umbrella-based psychology that is grounded in psychology, and also engages theories and research from a variety of other fields that study media and technology.

At Fielding, I believe that we are at a place where we have the opportunity to do something special, to influence peoples’ lives in important and meaningful ways. From understanding how mobile applications can best be used to encourage fitness, or stimulate happiness and mental well-being to create powerful advocacy campaigns and disaster relief efforts, such as the one most recently implemented by the Red Cross app that facilitated donations for the relief efforts in Nepal; we can learn about, demonstrate and research, how emergent technologies are enhancing our lives in powerful ways. By studying the psychological components engaged when we connect with media and technology we can inform better design and application.

For example, we can apply theory to emergent technologies to create and further define dynamic learning environments, use augmented and virtual reality to find new ways to understand and view the world, create delivery models that are media rich in presence, yet can cross geographical and time boundaries, and we can construct media that facilitates socially responsible advocacy for the betterment of humanity. With the ability to connect in more meaningful ways, collaborate cross-boundaries and cultures, share knowledge by making information more readily available and understandable, media psychology is a force for motivation, well-being, and good.

In her newest role as program director, Dr. Hogg continues to affirm the direction she sees the program going and why Fielding is the place for this vision. "It is my goal to continue to foster an energetic research center in media psychology which includes a collaborative learning space and a think-tank environment that provides businesses, organizations, nonprofits, and foundations a place to seek advice, consult, and research the intersection of human behavior and media and technology," stated Dr. Hogg. "My vision for the media psychology program within Fielding is to continue to establish the culture and identity of the program with administration, admissions and marketing, and the university in general, so we can best advertise, promote and attract students who are interested in media psychology...We are best aligned for positive outcomes, and impact, that includes strong student learning and ground breaking research, when there is a good fit. It is the story, the vision, and the cohesive message that allows not only the potential to understand who we are, but creates the vision of what we commit to as a program, a program that embraces the breadth of the field of media psychology in a foundational manner and offers specializations as our core niche. Current proposed certificates in neuroscience, brand psychology, and immersive media are a good start in this direction."

One of Dr. Hogg's areas of interest as a media psychologist is to look at virtual and augmented environments to see how people can bring a sense of presence to these environments - to make it feel as real as when we share physical presence. She frequently speaks on psychological components and influences of media and technology on human behavior and she continues to uncover new areas for research and understanding.

Dr. Hogg began her career studying engineering and then made the unusual jump to journalism and communications. While it might not have made sense at the time to make this transition, it fueled her interest in the science and the technology behind how people are driven to connect and communicate. To this day, she continues to examine a variety of interests, which are primarily based around how media influences people's lives, relationships, and humans make meaning out of life in a highly digitized world. Her passion continues to remain in the ways people connect and make meaning in digital environments. As Dr. Hogg continues her studies as a researcher and as a graduate of the media psychology program at Fielding, she would like to give back to her university and the field she proudly represents.

Tags: Media psychology, APA, psychology, fielding faculty, social media, leadership, clinical psychology, fielding graduate university, graduate education, scholar practitioner

Fourth Fielding Monograph Published: Leadership Studies in Healthcare

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Thu, May 14, 2015

New research on leadership in healthcare is the focus of the latest edition of the ongoing monograph research series. 

Fielding monograph number 4 resized 600Titled “Leadership Studies in Healthcare,” this monograph is edited by Fielding Professor Marie Farrell, EdD, former visiting Professor at Harvard School of Public Health, who also served as program manager for nursing, midwifery, and social work for the World Health Organization (WHO).

This publication includes seven recent researches from outstanding Fielding’s School of Human Organizational Development (HOD) graduates. Paula Rowland, PhD, addresses hospital safety, a perennial concern, in her analysis of patient safety discourses in a Canadian hospital. Cheryl Nance, PhD, examines the impact of a year-long intervention program among hospital leadership, using Action Learning. Ellen Raboin, PhD, investigates phenomena of collaborative practice within a hospital’s healthcare team. Beth Houskamp examines certain transformational leadership practices of Clinical Nurse Leaders, based on her research in five inpatient units. 

Additionally, Maureen Gormley, PhD, chief operating officer of the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, addresses the ways in which attitudes towards individuals with intellectual disability (ID) were changed through an innovative program, Project Search. Cheryl Mitchell, PhD, studies the dynamics of blame in the highly charged environment of the healthcare workplace—a subject about which a clear lacuna exists in the literature. Stephen Redmon, PhD, concludes this monograph with an incisive inquiry into the experiences and effects on service-disabled veterans and their family members.

This Fielding monograph is now available worldwide on all of Amazon’s distribution channels here. An electronic version of the book, to be distributed by Apple iBooks, is in preparation. 

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Introduction to Leadership Studies in Healthcare:

Effective leadership is a vital component of any organization, and nowhere more so than in the healthcare sector. Increasingly, researchers and practitioners have begun to treat healthcare
organizations as uniquely complex systems, made up of diverse human constituencies and resources that rely on innovative leadership to not only function properly but also produce the best possible clinical care for patients and their families. This monograph explores some of the challenges of healthcare leadership in a time of ongoing reorganization and consolidation in the healthcare industry and the transformative changes in the wake of government-mandated health insurance.

Dr. Paula Rowland addresses hospital safety, a perennial concern, in her analysis of patient safety discourses in a Canadian hospital. She argues that, whereas traditionally patient safety has been seen at the intersection between complicated systems and fallible human agents, it might be reframed as a multi-dimensional issue drawing from sociological and organizational studies.

Dr. Cheryl Nance presents an approach to changing an organized delivery system’s culture. She examines the impact of a year-long intervention program among hospital leadership, using Action Learning, to manage the cultural transformation involved with opening of a new facility while remaining financially viable. Her research identifies significant differences among leaders across all departments in current and preferred culture types, and relates them to the factors deemed essential to the success of the system’s change.

Dr. Ellen Raboin’s research focuses on the phenomena of collaborative practice within a hospital’s healthcare team. She examines the factors considered as legitimate and important enablers of a successful working relationship within an interprofessional team, and shows the ways in which the team’s collaborative practices change over time in light of the presence of the patient and his or her family. Dr. Raboin uses methods from a communications perspective as well as from relational social constructionism.

Beth Houskamp turns our attention to the transformational leadership practices of Clinical Nurse Leaders, based on her research in five inpatient units. Her research indicates that, as a group, licensed personnel and those with advanced educational preparation perceived the transformational leadership practices of Clinical Nurse Leaders to be higher than did a group of unlicensed personnel and those with less education.

Dr. Maureen Gormley, the Chief Operating Officer of the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, addresses the ways in which attitudes towards individuals with intellectual disability (ID) were changed through an innovative program, Project Search, and how workplace stigma was experienced from the perspective of co-workers. Her findings suggest that participants who initially held negative perceptions related to the youths’ anticipated capabilities and behaviors overcame those perceptions by identifying the positive contributions that youth with ID made to the workplace.

Dr. Cheryl Mitchell studied the dynamics of blame in a highly charged environment of the healthcare workplace—a subject about which a clear lacuna exists in the literature. Her study of 17 senior healthcare leaders exposes the often corrosive effects of the “blame game” when “things go bad,” and how a positive, reinforcing, feedback loop can help counteract the damage of trying to allocate blame.

Dr. Stephen Redmon concludes this monograph with an incisive inquiry into the experiences and effects on service-disabled veterans and their family members of a unique Entrepreneurship Boot Camp for Veterans Family Program (EBV-F). This program was designed to support veterans experiencing discontinuous life transitions while strengthening their entrepreneurial skills. The data suggested that participants experienced the program as being truly transformative, by strengthening their self-perceptions and their situations, and by engaging them in new roles and relationships.

We would like to thank each of the authors for their important contributions to this monograph, while also expressing great appreciation to the members of our editorial board, who thoughtfully joined us in the peer review of this edition, including Drs. David Willis, Miguel Guilarte, Barbara Mink, and Stephen Murphy- Shigematsu. Great appreciation also goes to our wonderfully diligent editorial coordinator, Gwen DuBois-Wing, and our copy editor, Margaret Bonanno.
Our hope is that this edition of the Fielding monograph series will support a growing recognition of the preeminent role of leadership in healthcare systems, not only in American and international academia, but also as an extension of our pursuit of human wellbeing and the key role that the public and private sectors play therein.

MARIE FARRELL, HEALTHCARE LEADERSHIP EDITOR
JEAN-PIERRE ISBOUTS, MONOGRAPH SERIES EDITOR

 

 

 

 

Tags: psychology, Transformational learning, fielding faculty, higher education, fielding graduate university, healthcare, graduate education, military psychology, veterans

Psi Chi Chapter of Fielding Graduate University Raises $1,800 for Big Brothers Big Sisters

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Mon, Mar 30, 2015

With only two weeks to fundraise, members, faculty and psychology students in the Psi Chi Chapter of Fielding Graduate University raised more than $1,800 for Big Brothers Big Sisters of Santa Barbara County.

By Melinda Johansson for the Family Service Agency |

Psi Chi check presentation Jan 2015 resized 600

This achievement, which includes a $500 match from Fielding Graduate University, sponsors a Big and Little match for one year.

“We are very thankful to Brothers Big Sisters of Santa Barbara County for all they do to support the emotional development of children,” said Jeanie Metivier, president of Fielding Graduate University Psi Chi Chapter. “We are thrilled to champion their work and appreciate Fielding Graduate University’s commitment and support of student organizations that make projects like this possible.”

Fielding Graduate University Psi Chi Chapter is a local chapter of Psi Chi, the International Honor Society in Psychology. The honor society is open to Fielding psychology students who have a 3.5 GPA or higher.

The mission of Psi Chi has several goals, one of which is to "promote ethical and socially responsible members and leaders." One way for members to learn social responsibility and leadership is through chapter service projects.

Big Brothers Big Sisters was selected as a service project for a few reasons, primarily because members had clinical or personal experiences with its programmatic results and wanted to support the emotional health and well-being of Santa Barbara County citizens.

Big Brothers Big Sisters is recognized as the single most effective prevention-based mentoring program in the United States. At-risk children ages 6 to 15 are carefully matched with caring adult mentors, who help them reach their full potential trough one-to-one relationships built on trust, friendship, consistency, support and guidance. In a recent national report titled The Mentoring Effect, it has been determined that young people who are mentored show improvements academically, socially and economically. These types of improvements are a direct result of the investment in our most valuable resource, our community’s children, which will lead to stronger and safer communities.

Locally, Big Brothers Big Sisters is a program of Family Service Agency.

— Melinda Johansson is the marketing manager for Family Service Agency.

Photo from left, Sean Whaley, Big Brother and Family Service Agency board member; Jeremy Jinkerson, vice president of the Psi Chi Chapter; Tiffany Duffing, secretary of the Psi Chi Chapter; David Edelman, vice president of advancement and development for Fielding Graduate University; April Harris-Britt, Ph.D., faculty sponsor for the Psi Chi Chapter, with daughter Aliyah Colin Lim, treasurer for the Psi Chi Chapter; and Jeanie Metivier, president of the Psi Chi Chapter. (Family Service Agency photo)


Tags: psychology, higher education, fielding graduate university, scholar activist

Fielding Introduces New Program at the ICDL Conference in Boston

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Tue, Dec 16, 2014

Fielding Graduate University Introduces New Infant and Early Childhood Development (IECD) PhD program to 200 members of Interdisciplinary Council on Development and Learning (ICDL)

President Katrina Rogers, PhD, along with School of Educational Leadership for Change (ELC) Program Director Kathy Tiner, PhD, ELC faculty member Jenny Edwards, PhD, psychology faculty ICDL Conference 2member Debra Bendell, PhD, adjunct faculty and Program Leader, Infant and Early Childhood Development (IECD) Ira Glovinsky, PhD, and Admissions Advisor Bob Harriman attended the (ICDL) Conference in November in Boston, MA. President Rogers introduced Fielding and the new Infant and Early Childhood Development (IECD) PhD program to 200 members of ICDL. ICDL is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to redefining and promoting each child’s development to their fullest potential (www.icdl.com). Fifteen Fielding IECD students were present and the following three students presented their graduate work: Melissa Grosvenor, Carrie Alvarado, and Sara McMahan. IECD ICDL Conference 1faculty Ira Glovinsky opened the session with a keynote presentation entitled "Emotions and Mood Dysregulation in Infants and Toddlers: The Neuroscience of Moods Including the Dyadic Transactions that Lead to Positive and Negative Moods." The conference was a huge success and Fielding’s presence was greatly appreciated.

Pictured in the top left photo:Fielding IECD students Cheryl Rock and Julie Sealy Directors of the Sunshine Stimulation Centre in Barbados
Pictured in the lower right photo: Carrie Alvarado and Melissa Grosvenor

Tags: educational leadership, psychology, higher education, fielding graduate university, graduate education, infant and childhood education

Fielding Ranks in Top 20 Most Innovative Degree Programs in 2014

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Fri, Oct 10, 2014

Fielding Graduate University's PhD in Clinical Psychology- Neuropsychology Concentration - Ranks in the Top 20 Most Innovative Graduate Psychology

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Degree Programs in 2014

OCTOBER 10, 2014, http://www.bestpsychologydegrees.com/top/innovative-graduate-psychology-degree-programs/: As competition becomes increasingly intense for jobs in psychology, it is more important than ever for students to choose graduate psychology degree programs that provide an edge in the workforce. Although many practicing psychologists are deciding to put off retirement, and psychology jobs are growing at the rate of just three percent, the Center for Workforce Studies still reports that 5,000 new psychology doctorates are handed out annually. In order to help you get the most out of your training and beat out the competition for a limited number of jobs, we’ve identified a set of highly innovative graduate-level psychology degree programs for you to consider. Most of the programs described below assume that you’ve already earned a psychology master’s degree.

At this time, the three fastest growing areas of the field are thought to be neuropsychology, industrial-organizational psychology, and geropsychology, so we put special emphasis on including programs with offerings in those areas. In addition, our editors also sought to highlight the following types of programs.

1) Those whose faculty is among the most highly cited in the field.

2) Those that have shown exceptional progress in the area of diversity.

3) Those with at least some online offerings.

Click here for the complete article by http://www.bestpsychologydegrees.com.

Tags: APA, psychology, Distributed education, clinical psychology, fielding graduate university, graduate education, distance education

Synergy, Healing, and Empowerment: Insights from Cultural Diversity

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Wed, Mar 12, 2014

School of Human & Organizational Development Faculty Member, Stephen Murphy-Shigematsu, EdD, Co-Authors a Book with His Graduate School Mentor

"I highly recommend Synergy, Healing, and Empowerment for all those interested in indigenous psychology and cross-cultural psychology. I believe that all professional psychologists and policy makers can benefit from the profound insights of the authors." American Psychological Association

Synergy Healing and Empowerment resized 600Stephen Murphy-Shigematsu’s recent book, Synergy, Healing, and Empowerment: Insights from Cultural Diversity, has a special meaning for him as the co-author is his mentor from graduate school, Richard Katz. “Professor Katz had an unforgettable impact on my life as a mentor and to be able to write and publish a book together is amazing.”  

They first met when Katz was a professor at Harvard and Murphy-Shigematsu was a young man searching for a way to integrate his experiences in Japan studying healers into a career path. “He became a mentor in the deepest sense of seeing in me what I could not yet see in myself and trusting me in ways that led me to take on challenges that I was hesitant to accept. Our personal and professional relationship is a wonderful testimony to the power of mentoring.”

Synergy, Healing, and Empowerment is a book that originated in discussion with Katz and his many dedicated graduate students. It went through many iterations but was never completed. Katz left Harvard to become professor at what is now First Nations University of Canada where his contributions included building the Masters of Aboriginal Social Work Program. He also lived and worked with Indigenous Elders and healers around the world. After receiving his doctorate in psychology, Murphy-Shigematsu returned to Japan to be a professor at the University of Tokyo. It was many years before their paths crossed again, and the book helped to bring them together over a labor of love.

“A few years ago we were talking and I realized that the book might reach fruition as a collaborative effort so I offered my help. It is the product of the work of so many people that it is humbling to be able to claim it in any way as mine. Some of the collaborators have contributed papers while others have generated the ideas represented in the book.”

Murphy-Shigematsu describes Synergy, Healing, and Empowerment as part of the legacy of Professor Katz, representing innovative ideas he introduced at the highest levels of academia at a time when it took great courage to venture beyond the borders of an institution like Harvard. Katz’s paradigm of synergy influenced a large group of students who have gone on to distinguished careers as scholar-practitioners.

In Synergy, Healing, and Empowerment, Katz, Murphy-Shigematsu, and some colleagues offer the paradigm of synergy to overcome the scarcity of valuable health and education resources. The authors explore alternative ways in the areas of counseling, education, and community health and development to enhance synergy, expanding formerly scarce resources that can become renewable and accessible to all. Drawing upon the diverse cultural experiences of Aboriginal groups in North America and around the world, the book provides practical insights into the emergence of synergy and obstacles to its existence.

Stanley Krippner calls Synergy, Healing, and Empowerment “an incredible book, “necessary and timely,” that makes a “compelling case for the paradigm of synergy, which releases an ever-expanding network of healing and empowerment.” Paul Pedersen, a pioneer scholar in multicultural counseling, claims that it pushes the envelope and “shows the direction counseling and psychotherapy must go.” And President Katrina Rogers describes it as “a treasure, whose narrative approach to transformational education has potential to lead Fielding in conversation that allows people to open up their hearts to new ways of thinking about the complexity in the world.”

Stephen Murphy-Shigematsu

Stephen Murphy-Shigematsu is consulting professor, Stanford University School of Medicine, and a faculty member at Fielding Graduate University.

Richard Katz

Richard Katz, PhD, received his doctorate in clinical psychology from Harvard University and taught there for nearly 20 years. Over the past 45 years, he has also lived and worked with Indigenous Elders and healers around the world. Richard is currently a professor emeritus at the First Nations University of Canada and an adjunct professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Saskatchewan.

For more information: http://www.brusheducation.ca/books/synergy-healing-and-empowerment

Tags: psychology, indigenous psychology, fielding graduate university, human development

1974-2014: Fielding Graduate University Celebrates 40 Years

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Mon, Mar 03, 2014

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Founded in March 1974 in Santa Barbara, CA, The Fielding Institute (now Fielding Graduate University) Celebrates its 40th Year in Higher Education

Fielding Graduate University is the realization of the vision of three founders: Frederic Hudson, Hallock Hoffman, and Renata Tesch. The founders, all distinguished higher education administrators and educators, in their respective capacities as president, executive vice-president, and dean of education, each contributed an essential ingredient to the establishment of the university. Many other key individuals, through their diligence, hard work, and firm belief in the national need for mid-career professional education, gave substance to the dream.

The founders envisioned a nationally recognized graduate school, which would serve mid-careerFounders Photo professionals who wanted to pursue an advanced degree but whose educational and professional objectives could not be met by traditional institutions of higher education. The founders succeeded in their mission. Their success was predicated on two basic, but at the time, rather advanced notions. First, they recognized that changing demographics were altering the nature of society, particularly the world of higher education.

More often than not, the founders speculated, students seeking advanced degrees would be mid-career adults who wanted to enhance their established academic and professional skills; who, in many cases, would be committed to effecting a mid-life career change; and all of whom, by the nature of their quest for a quality graduate education at mid-life, would be interested in being part of a lifelong learning community.

Second, the founders realized that adults learn new tasks and accrue knowledge in ways that differ significantly from those of adolescents and young adults. The traditional pedagogical method of education - active teacher, passive learner - would not be appropriate to this new experiment in adult professional education. To accommodate and capitalize upon the learning styles of its student, Fielding developed a rigorous, supportive learning model that today remains flexible, adult-centered, self-directed, task-oriented, and competence-based.

In the Fielding archives, an original document  written by founder Frederic Hudson outlines the beginning of Fielding's history:

History and Background of The Fielding Institute

Fielding was founded in March 1974, as a graduate school in education and psychology designed to serve the educational interests of professional persons in mid-career.  Fielding is new, small, and specialized. We chose two fields in which neither buildings nor equipment are especially important, in which our fascination with human beings and their learning, feeling and knowing could be the focus of our attention. We made our programs “external”—not to be carried on in our environment, but to be accomplished by our Students in connection with their own lives and work, in their own surroundings.

Fielding serves a distinct population: mature professional persons in mid-career. We aim to assist intelligent, competent adults to attain goals of their own, and to measure their achievements by their own increases in competence and knowledge.

Frederic Hudson and Hallock Hoffman first met on a committee established by the Western College Association to advise a study on the meaning of baccalaureate degrees. Subsequently, Frederic Hudson became associated with Laurence University, an external graduate program school. Dr. Hudson, asked Hallock Hoffman and Renata Tesch to join him as faculty members...Resigning from Laurence, we set up Fielding, in part to satisfy our desires to create a program of which we could be proud, and in part to fulfill our responsibilities to a group of students who had been studying with us at Laurence and who were in danger of being stranded by our departure.

Several of those students joined us by enrolling during the founding period of Fielding; their support enabled us to become a functioning school in a much shorter time than would otherwise have been possible. 19 of these students so far have graduated, because they were already at an advanced stage in their studies (with us as their program supervisors)when they entered the Fielding program. Of subsequent students who enrolled initially in Fielding, 10 Master of Arts students and 11 doctoral students have graduated.

The Institute was organized as a non-profit educational corporation in California in March, 1974. We obtained state and federal tax exemption shortly thereafter. We raised the necessary capital and completed the requirements for (a)(3)recognition under the then California education code in July, 1974. Since licensing is important for many of our psychology Students, we applied for and were successful in obtaining (a)(2) Approved status under the State Board of Education in July, 1975.(“Approved status” is now described by California Education Code 94310(b)). Our graduates are now eligible to be examined for the state licenses that may be obtained with “approved” school education. This includes the license as psychologist under the Psychology Examining Committee of the Board of Medical Examiners and the license for Marriage, Family and Child Counselors, from the Board of Behavioral Science Examiners, both of California. Some state agencies, however, are governed by laws that limit their licenses to graduates of “accredited”schools, and for such students, Fielding is presently not serviceable.

Our first students were enrolled in the Education Program. Our individual learning contract curriculum was different from Laurence’s traditional curriculum; but the Laurence transfer students were able to continue the studies they had begun within our Education Program. The Master of Arts Program had its first admission in the summer of 1974. The Psychology Program enrolled its first Students in the fall of 1974. The MA Plan 3 Program, a program to prepare enrollees for admission to the Psychology Doctoral Program, was initiated in 1976. At that same time, we began discussing the possibility of a cooperative program in Human Development with Pacific Oaks College. These discussions led to the present program in which Students in our Education Program can specialize in Human Development, taking course work from, doing research with, and being for some purposes supervised by the faculty of Pacific Oaks College. The first Students enrolled in this program in 1977. A smaller cooperative program with the REM Institute of Cleveland, Ohio, enables REM Students to enroll simultaneously in our MA plan 3 program, and permits them to use the REM faculty as Field Faculty Advisors, teachers and trainers. Student first enrolled in the MA program in 1976.

We did not raise any sizable amount of money in connection with founding Fielding. From the beginning we have believed that the Institute should support itself from current tuition income. The capitalization necessary for (a)(3) recognition was developed through a generous gift of educational films from the Encyclopedia Britannica Educational Corporation. The founding officers drew no salaries for the first several months and only partial salaries for the following year. We have been on full salary since September 1975, and in March 1976, the Focus MagazineTrustees agreed that Fielding’s income was now sufficient to begin paying some of the officers’ salaries previously deferred. About half of this, the Corporation’s only debt, has now been paid.

The financial success of Fielding is thus a function of its ability to serve its students; and that equation is one we wish to preserve. We think it is healthy for us to be delivering educational services in exchange for payment; we do not want capital or endowment that would enable us to shift our primary attention away from services to students. We are creating reserves that ultimately will equal one year’s budget.

The financial success of Fielding is a direct outcome of the number of our enrollments. These have grown steadily, in accord with careful plans.

 

 

To read more about the history of Fielding through the stories of faculty and alumni, click here to view the special edition of FOCUS Magazine: Fielding Graduate University Special Edition: FOCUS Magazine

If you would like to receive a copy of Focus Magazine, please email your name and address to [email protected].

Tags: educational leadership, psychology, organizational change, Organizational development, fielding graduate university, graduate education, distance education

Fielding Psychology Faculty Member Announced New Editor of APA Journal: Qualitative Psychology

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Mon, Sep 23, 2013

Qualitative Psychology Makes a Comeback

As published in the Monitor on Psychology, written by Tori DeAngelis, September 2013, Vol 44, No. 8, Print version: page 79.

Click here to view the full article: http://www.apa.org/monitor/2013/09/qualitative.aspx

Ruthellen Josselson Monitor

Tags: APA, psychology, fielding graduate university

Review of The Oxford Handbook of Media Psychology in CHOICE Magazine, August 2013

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Tue, Aug 20, 2013

Oxford Handbook Media PSYAs cited on Oxford University Press:

It is indisputable that media is by far the most common means by which human beings spend our free time in the modern world.

However, the ubiquity of media in our lives brings with it advantages and disadvantages along with uncertainty: will increased dependence on media impair our social functioning, enhance it, or both? The Oxford Handbook of Media Psychology explores facets of human behavior, thoughts, and feelings experienced in the context of media use and creation. Divided into six sections, chapters in this volume trace the history of media psychology; address content areas for media research, including children’s media use, media violence and desensitization, sexual content, video game violence, and portrayals of race and gender; and cover psychological and physical effects of media such as serious games, games for health, technology addictions, and video games and attention. A section on meta-issues in media psychology brings together transportation theory, media psychophysiology, social influence in virtual worlds, and learning through persuasion. Other topics include the politics of media psychology, a lively debate about the future of media psychology methods, and the challenges and opportunities present in this interdisciplinary field.

Authored by top experts from psychology, communications, and related fields, this handbook presents a vibrant map of the field of media psychology.

The Handbook was edited by Fielding Graduate University faculty member Karen Dill, PhD.  Several Fielding faculty members authored chapters for the Handbook, including: Jean-Pierre Isbouts, DLitt, Jason Ohler, PhD, Regina Tuma,PhD, Don Polkinghorne, PhD, Janet de Merode, PhD, and  Pamela Rutledge, PhDFielding media psychology alumni, Ellen Derwin and Janet DeMerode, wrote chapters, as did student Michael Neal.

The following review appeared in the August 2013 issue of CHOICE magazine:

The Oxford Handbook of Media Psychology, edited by Karen E. Dill. Oxford, 2013:

This volume collects with precision essays from leading scholars on media psychology to present a comprehensive look at the foundations, history, methodology, and contemporary issues facing the field.  Dill's introduction to the volume uses historic and current media issues to provide a set of coordinates for the book, and the chapters on the foundation and definition of the field should be required reading for all media scholars. The book comprehensively covers classic areas of describe the imagestudy for media scholars, including violence and sexuality, ethnic portrayals, and persuasion. It presents quantitative and qualitative perspectives on these topics; the last five chapters discuss larger meta-issues that get little attention in journal publications.  The one reservation arises in chapter 9 due to the authors' snarky comment that "intelligent people still doubt the effects" of media violence on aggression.  Such writing presents a straw man argument that slights those who do not see the media violence debate as closed.  This is a masterful volume that frames the field of study well.  It will be a prominent volume in the "Oxford Library of Psychology" series, highlighting the topic's increased importance within the social sciences.  Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division  undergraduate, graduate, and research collections. -- N  D. Bowman, West Virginia University

"Choice," 50, no. 11 (August 2013): 96.

Tags: Media psychology, psychology, higher education, fielding graduate university, graduate education