Fielding Graduate University News

Fielding Awards Honorary Degree to Michael B. Goldstein, JD

Posted by Hilary Molina on Mon, Aug 03, 2015

Convocation 2015 8541 mike and katrina resized 600On July 19, 2015, Fielding Graduate University President Katrina Rogers, PhD, conferred the honorary doctorate of humane letters on Michael B. Goldstein, JD, co-chair of the Higher Education practice of Cooley LLP. In awarding this distinction, Dr. Goldstein joined other honorees including globally-known educator Paolo Friere, civil rights activist Marie Fielder, renowned psychologist Bob Goulding, LGBTQ advocate Lynn Lukow and inspired educator Eddie Seashore.

During the hooding and conferral of the degree, President Rogers reflected on Dr. Goldstein’s accomplishments, “He is a pioneer in the development of the legal environment in higher education, a counselor at the highest levels of legislation, a leader in championing creative approaches to higher education and an advocate of the highest ideals of learning as a means towards a more just and sustainable future for humanity.”

Following the conferral, Dr.Goldstein delivered the commencement address to the Fielding Summer Session 2015 graduates titled “The Importance of Timing and Convergence: Learning to Love Competency Based Learning.” In his remarks, Dr. Goldstein pointed to the barriers to learning based not on time-in-seat but demonstrated competencies, proposing the creation of what he termed a “super-accreditor specifically for the purpose of reviewing and evaluating non-time-based approaches to teaching, learning and documenting competencies.”

Dr. Goldstein served a total of 23 years as a Fielding trustee, including as itsMike GoldsteinConvocation 2015 8575 resized 600 chair, before retiring from the board in 2015. In 2012, the board created the Michael B. Goldstein Endowed Board Scholarship for Dissertation Research Advancing Social Justice, in recognition of his longtime service as a trustee and distinguished leader. This scholarship supports research by Fielding doctoral candidates on topics that further the achievement of a specific aspect of social justice. President Rogers appointed Dr. Goldstein as co-chair of Fielding’s newly organized President’s Advisory Council.

Dr. Goldstein is the founder and headed the education practice at Dow Lohnes, which merged with Cooley in 2014. Dr. Goldstein is a pioneer in the development and rational regulation of online, competency based, and other nontraditional modes of learning, including the creation of innovative approaches to combining the resources of the nonprofit, public, and for-profit sectors to improve access to quality higher education. He is the 2014 recipient of WCET’s Richard Jonsen Award for leadership in e-learning and is widely recognized for his distinguished service to many higher educational organizations.

Before entering private law practice, Dr. Goldstein was Associate Vice Chancellor for Urban and Governmental Affairs and Associate Professor of Urban Sciences at the University of Illinois-Chicago. Prior to that, he was an Assistant City Administrator and the Director Of University Relations for New York City. Dr. Goldstein holds a BA from Cornell University, a JD from New York University and was a Loeb Fellow at the Graduate School of Design, Harvard University.

Tags: social justice, educational leadership, conference, Competency Based Education, leadership, Distributed education, national session, higher education, fielding graduate university, graduate education, scholar activist, scholar practitioner

President of The Chicago School of Professional Psychology (TCSPP) Patricia Arredondo, EdD, to Discuss Latina Feminism

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Tue, Jul 14, 2015

Patricia Arredondo, EdD, to Discuss Latina Feminism at the Fielding Educational Series in Rosemont, IL

Latinas in the U.S. are in the process of claiming their power through higher education while navigating cultural divides in personal and professional relationships and in other social contexts.

SS15_Ed_Series_graphic-heart_ArredondoOn Wednesday, July 15, 2015 from 4–6 pm at the Westin O’Hare in Rosemont, IL, the Chicago Campus President of The Chicago School of Professional Psychology (TCSPP) Patricia Arredondo, EdD will discuss how Latina feminism influences peoples relationship-oriented cultural worldview and sense of fairness and social justice. As part of its National Summer Session in Rosemont, IL, Fielding Graduate University invites the extended Chicago community to join this educational presentation sponsored by Fielding’s Worldwide Network for Gender Empowerment, titled Leading from the Heart and Cultural Roots. This event is free and open to the public.                                                                                  

Latina feminism is influenced by our relationship-oriented cultural worldview and sense of fairness and social justice. This feminist framework is rooted in historic events that place a value on education, community engagement, and compassion. Latinas in the U.S. are in the process of claiming their power through higher education while navigating cultural divides in personal and professional relationships and in other social contexts. Dr. Arredondo will present concepts and models, often invisible to Latinas themselves that contribute to our sense of identity and empowerment.

About Patricia Arredondo, EdD

Arredondo_Commencement_PhotoPatricia Arredondo, EdD, became Chicago Campus President of The Chicago School of Professional Psychology (TCSPP) in February 2013. She joined the school after successfully serving in senior administrative roles with the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and Arizona State University. Additionally, she led an organizational consulting firm addressing diversity in the workplace in Boston for 13 years. As of June 2015, she has assumed a new position with TCSPP as Senior Advisor for Institutional Initiatives.

In the academic world, Arredondo is a national leader and scholar on many fronts, extensively published in the areas of multicultural competency development, immigrant issues in counseling, counseling with Latinas/os, women’s leadership and, organizational diversity. She has authored more than 100 referred journal articles, book chapters, and training videos and is regularly invited for keynote addresses nationally and internationally. Her latest book, Culturally Responsive Counseling for Latinas/os was published in 2014 by the American Counseling Association (ACA) Press. Currently, Arredondo is also co-principal Investigator on a three-year training grant from the National Science Foundation that advances women of color in the STEM fields to administrative opportunities at Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Tribal Colleges. She considers herself a social justice advocate and an educator at heart.

Civic and professional organization leadership is visible throughout Arredondo’s career. She served as president of four national associations, among these was the American Counseling Association (ACA), the largest counseling association in the world. She is the only Latina to serve in that position. Arredondo was also president of the American Psychological Association Division 45 - Society for the Psychological Study of Ethnic Minority Issues, the Association of Multicultural Counseling and Development of the ACA and the founding president of the National Latina/o Psychological. In the civic arena, Arredondo has always been active in community activities. Among her leadership roles were president of the Board of Family and Children’s Services in Boston, on the board of the Diversity Leadership Committee for the City of Phoenix, Vice-Chair of the Social Development Commission for Milwaukee County, the largest anti-poverty organization in Wisconsin, and more recently she was appointed to the Advisory Board for DiversityMBA Magazine in Chicago. She chairs the Board of Professional Affairs for the American Psychological Association.

Arredondo has been the recipient of many awards and recognitions throughout her career. Many of these awards acknowledge her as a “pioneer” or change agent in her profession. She is the 2013 recipient of the prestigious Henry Tomes Award for Distinguished Lifetime Contributions to the Advancement of Ethnic Minority Psychology, the “Living Legend” award from the ACA, the Lifetime Achievement Award from APA Division 45, the Madrina Award by the National Latina/o Psychological Association, and an honorary degree from the University of San Diego; she also holds Fellow status with the American Counseling and American Psychological Associations. She enjoys promoting women’s leadership, mentoring graduate students, emerging professionals, entrepreneurs, and individuals who want to make a difference on behalf of others.

Arredondo holds degrees from Kent State University, Boston College, and Boston University. She is a licensed psychologist and bilingual in English and Spanish. Arredondo is extremely proud of her Mexican American heritage. Arredondo is family-centered and enjoys her extended family engagements across the country.

 For more information about all of the Fielding Educational Series please visit https://www.eventbrite.com/e/fielding-educational-series-summer-2015-registration-17487812518.

Tags: EdD, social justice, educational leadership, diversity, sociology, leadership, adult learning, fielding graduate university, human rights, learning

Fielding's Social Justice Award Recognizes Fielder and Chouinard

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Fri, Jan 23, 2015

Fielding Graduate University's Social Justice Award Recognizes the life work of Marie Fielder, PhD (posthumous) and Yvon Chouinard, founder and CEO of Patagonia.

During Fielding's annual Janaury Winter Session at the Fess Parker Doubletree Resort in Santa Barbara,CA, faculty, students, staff and alumni came together to recognize the social justice work of Fielder and Chouinard. The Social Justice Award was established in 1986 by psychology alumna Lynn Friedman Kessler to recognize demonstrated concern for and commitment to the furtherance of social justice. The award is granted through the Office of the President and demonstrative of one Fielding's core values focused on reducing the many forms of inequality.

Marie Fielder, PhD

Marie FielderFielder achieved national prominence as the first African American woman with a doctorate to teach in the San Francisco Bay Area, and for her theories that focused on how diverse cultures and groups relate to one another. Fielder was one of the first researchers to document cultural bias in IQ testing, and was instrumental in making the Berkeley public schools the first in the nation to desegregate through two-way busing.

In the 1960’s and 1970’s, Fielder contributed to the work of such civil rights leaders as Martin Luther King, Jr., and Whitney Young. She also advised numerous government and civil-rights organizations, including the U.S. Department of Education, the Black Panther Party for Defense and Justice, and the National Organization for Women. Fielder lectured, directed diversity forums, and conducted workshops and training for many school systems, government agencies and businesses across the United States.

Fielder worked with many kinds of people to help empower and enable them to solve their own problems. She inspired several generations of students at the three universities at which she held faculty appointments in California, many of whom went on to pursue highly successful careers.

As Congressman Ron Dellums said about her in 1995 when he acknowledged Fielder in the Congressional Record, she has been an exemplary public servant, bringing quiet dignity and distinction to every project on which she has worked.

Yvon Chouinard

Yvon Chouinard

Chouinard was born in Lewiston, Maine, in 1938, and raised in Southern California. There, as a teen he taught himself how to climb, surf, skin dive—and blacksmith. By the early 1970s when he founded Patagonia, Chouinard Equipment pitons, carabiners and ice axes had become the world standard.

Spending 140 days a year in the natural world, Chouinard learned early in his life as an alpinist, surfer and fly fisherman the seriousness of the environmental crisis—and he brought this knowledge to bear on his work. In the late 1980s he instituted Patagonia’s earth tax, pledging 1 percent of sales to the preservation and restoration of the natural environment.

In the 1990s, Chouinard encouraged Patagonia to consciously to reduce the environmental footprint of its products and activities, beginning with a 100 percent switch from conventional to organic cotton and the introduction of fleece clothing made from recycled polyester. He then sought to work with other partner companies to reduce environmental harm on a global scale. Chouinard, either independently, or with Patagonia helped co-found the Fair Labor Association, One Percent for the Planet, the Textile Exchange, the Conservation Alliance, and the Sustainable Apparel Coalition. In addition, Patagonia has been a B corp member since 2012.

Chouinard continues to surf and fly fish. He is the author or co-author of Climbing Ice, Let My People Go Surfing, The Responsible Company and Simple Fly Fishing.

President Katrina Rogers and Vice President of Strategic Initiatives and Research, Orlando Taylor, PhD, took stage in front of a packed house to introduce the outstanding work of the recipients.

Nicola Smith, MBA, JD, daughter of Fielder, shared some inspiring words about her mother’s work, as she accepted her award posthumously. She encouraged today and tomorrow’s scholar to exemplify Fielding’s values by leading the way in the social justice field.

Social justice award nicola yvon katrina resized 600Highlights of the evening also included a question and answer session with Chouinard after he introduced his company values and goals. Chouinard enthusiastically shared personal insights to his life and business vision. The discussion addressed topics such as his work to promote a more sustainable retail industry that educates consumers, his ongoing commitment to choose international supplier with safe and fair practices and his efforts to offer an innovative and equitable working environment to his employees. As the evening closed, the energy in the room was contagious after what had proved to be a lively and informative award ceremony.

 

Tags: patagonia, social justice, sustainability, higher education, fielding graduate university

James A. Banks to Receive The Fielding Social Justice Award

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Thu, May 08, 2014

FGU Seal web resized 600The Social Justice Award was established in 1986 by psychology alumna Lynn Friedman Kessler to recognize demonstrated concern for and commitment to the furtherance of social justice.

At Fielding Graduate University, social justice is the commitment to understanding, analyzing, and acting to reduce inequity, oppression and social stratification, recognizing the linkages between economics, social and ecological justice.

The hope is that the action for which the award is conferred will provide exemplary models of commitment to social justice for Fielding Graduate University and its members. The award is granted through the Office of the President and ia demonstrative of one of our core values, reducing the many forms of inequality.

The Fielding Graduate University Social Justice Award is given each year, one award to a Fielding student and/or alumni, and another will be made to a Fielding faculty and/or staff member. 

This evening, Thursday, May 8, 2014, at the University Club in San Francisco, CA, President Katrina Rogers is awarding the Fielding Graduate University Social Justice Award to James A. Banks in recognition for his exemplary commitment to social justice work through his extensive work in multicultural education.

James A. BanksBanks holds the Kerry and Linda Killinger Endowed Chair in Diversity Studies and is the founding director of the Center for Multicultural Education at the University of Washington, Seattle. He was the Russell F. Stark University Professor at the University of Washington from 2001 to 2006. Banks is a past president of the American Educational Research Association and of the National Council for the Social Studies.

He is a specialist in social studies education and multicultural education and has written widely in these fields. His books include Teaching Strategies for Ethnic Studies; Cultural Diversity and Education: Foundations, Curriculum, and Teaching; Educating Citizens in a Multicultural Society; and Race, Culture, and Education: The Selected Works of James A. Banks. Banks is the editor of the Handbook of Research on Multicultural Education; The Routledge International Companion to Multicultural Education; Diversity and Citizenship Education: Global Perspectives; and the Encyclopedia of Diversity in Education, published in 2012 by Sage in both hard and electronic editions.

banks quote

Banks is also the editor of the Multicultural Education Series of books published by Teachers College Press, Columbia University. There are now 52 published books in this Series; others are in development. Banks is a member of the National Academy of Education and a Fellow of the American Educational Research Association.

During the 2005-2006 academic year, Banks was a Spencer Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford. In 2007 he was the Tisch Distinguished Visiting Professor at Teachers College, Columbia University. He was a Visiting Distinguished Professor at the University of Hong Kong in 2010, a Visiting Professor at the Minzu University of China in 2011 (in Beijing), and a Visiting Professor at Northwest Normal University in Lanzhou, China in 2012.

He holds honorary doctorates from the Bank Street College of Education (New York), the University of Alaska Fairbanks, the University of Wisconsin–Parkside, DePaul University, Lewis and Clark College, and Grinnell College and is a recipient of the UCLA Medal, the university’s highest honor. In 2005, Banks delivered the 29th Annual Faculty Lecture at the University of Washington, the highest honor given to a professor at the University. 

Research by Banks on how educational institutions can improve race and ethnic relations has greatly influenced schools, colleges, and universities throughout the United States and the world. Banks has given lectures on citizenship education and diversity in many different nations, including Australia, Canada, China, Cyprus, England, Ethiopia, France, Germany, Greece, Hong Kong, Ireland, Israel, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Norway, Russia, Scotland, Singapore, Sweden, and New Zealand. His books have been translated into Greek, Japanese, Chinese, Korean, and Turkish.

Past recipients include:

  • Paolo Friere
  • Jan Hively
  • Valerie Bentz
  • Jodie Morrow
  • Peter Park
  • Jodie Veroff
  • Argentine Craig
  • Leonard Baca
  • Cathy Royal
  • Christine Ho
  • Pat Kilby-Robb
  • Isidro Ruby
  • Susan Cortez
  • Judy Colemans
  • Susan Ferrant
  • Susan Taira

For more information about social justice work at Fielding: http://www.fielding.edu/whyFielding/social-justice

 

 

Tags: social justice, educational leadership, diversity, multicultural, fielding graduate university

Fielding Graduate University at The Justice Conference in LA

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Fri, Mar 07, 2014

Fielding Has a Visible Presence at The Justice Conference

Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Reported by Monique L. Snowden, PhD, vice president for academic services at Fielding Graduate University

Fielding recently returned to the Orpheum Theatre in Los Angeles, CA where we sponsored the International Positive Aging Conference in 2010, 2011, and 2013. This time, however, we were at the fourth annual Justice Conference promoting Fielding student, faculty and alumni’s justice work and recruiting prospective students for our academic programs.

The conference included a lineup of plenary speakers, musical and spoken word artists, and discussion panelists. Nearly 2,000 conference attendees, sponsors and exhibitors packed the theater for each scheduled speaker, artist and panelist. In between talks and performances, the main lobby, mezzanine lobby, stairways and exhibitor areas were buzzing with rich dialogue about the “work” represented and inspired by those on agenda and attending the Justice Conference.Justice Conference

Many conference attendees, plenary speakers, panelists, artists and exhibitors came into and do justice work for reasons not shared by all and are grounded by doctrines not held by all. Differences in personal motivations or beliefs notwithstanding, those whom the Fielding delegation engaged in conversation shared our university’s vision to create a more humane, just and sustainable world. By way of our institutional values and demonstrable justice work we attracted interest in both our academic offerings and partnership opportunities with organizations in attendance like Memphis Teacher Residency (MTR). MTR proclaims that “Urban Education is the Greatest Social Justice and Civil Rights Issue in America Today.”

Bryan A. Stevenson, founder and executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative, an Alabama-based group delivered a powerful message. Mr. Stevenson and his EJI colleagues have won major legal challenges eliminating excessive and unfair sentencing, exonerating innocent prisoners on death row, confronting abuse of the incarcerated and the mentally-ill, and aiding children prosecuted as adults. 

Conference attendees were consistently reminded that justice work is intensive and extensive. As one conference speaker advised, to do our best justice work, we must manage our egos, exhaustion and emotional toxicity. We must remain humble in our work, take time to rejuvenate our spirits and re-energize our bodies, and balance our passion with necessary discipline and focus. We must keep top of mind that the difficult and never-ending fight for justice is not one that merely involves lifting up and comforting those who need resources and services.

Justice work requires us to stand with the poor, fight beside the condemned, and dwell amongst the vulnerable. We must see and hold ourselves accountable as one people who are global citizens of interrelated communities, states, countries, and continents. Slain humanitarian and civil rights activist Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. left us with a timeless justice credo, “We are bound by an inescapable garment of mutuality, whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly.

For more information about The Justice Conference, click here: http://thejusticeconference.com/

Tags: social justice, diversity, fielding graduate university, human rights

Exploring the Struggle for Social Justice in Washington DC

Posted by Marianne McCarthy on Tue, Sep 03, 2013

Fielding Graduate University Students, Faculty and Alumni Seeing Social Justice In Action

by Marianne McCarthy

During Fielding Graduate University's All School National Session, in Alexandria, VA, students, alumni, and faculty stepped into tSJ Strugglehe community to see the struggle for social justice first hand.

In a true scholar-practitioner manner, Human & Organizational Development (HOD) faculty members David Willis, PhD, and Richard Appelbaum, PhD, led a group of fifteen students and alumni on a field trip seminar through our nation’s capital to learn about historical and contemporary perspectives from the activists themselves. They visited activists working to secure safety in the workplace, preserve the cultural heritage of community music, and advance our standard of living.

Recent HOD graduate Karen Bogart ('13), PhD who participated in the seminar once before, said she appreciates the opportunity of hearing from individuals who are dealing with social justice from a political, advocacy or lobbying vantage point. “Having Summer Session in Washington provides a unique opportunity to draw on the diverse resources in DC that focus on social justice issues around the globe.”

“I’ve always been a believer in experiential education,” said Willis. “It’s important for me to take people out of the hotels and into the community.”

The first stop in the tour was the offices of the Workers’ Rights Consortium (WRC) where they spoke with Director Scott Nova who has been in the news recently advocating for workers’ safety in places like Bangladesh.

An international advocacy group, the WRC is “an under-resourced, hard-working organization that is making progress relative to regulations and agreements among major brands in terms of the treatment of workers in textile factories,” said Bogart, whose own personal interest lie in corporate governance.

According to Bogart, the WRC has had some success in the European Union. Ground-breaking agreements recently signed by major brands indicate progress toward oversight of safety and a greater investment in local communities.

Next, the group visited Dr. Atesh Sonneborn of the Smithsonian Folkways collection at the National Portrait Gallery which has archived a collection of American musical and cultural heritage that documents the social justice struggle. Willis characterized the Folkways collection as a sort of ministry of culture.

“What they’re doing is culture as ways of knowing and doing,” said Willis emphasizing the need to preserve individual voices which represent the struggle for justice.

“It’s really capturing the local voices and their experiences,” added Bogart.

The group also met separately with Judith Appelbaum, a Georgetown law professor and director of programs for the American Constitution Society for Law and Policy and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders. Appelbaum talked about the Snowden case, the voting rights decision of the Supreme Court, and other current judicial issues.  Sanders added a unique perspective to the day with his efforts to effect change from within our system of laws and government.

“His politics are very clear,” said Willis. “You can almost guess with 100% accuracy where he’s going to be on an issue, but he respects his colleagues and their differences.  I appreciated that because differences and diverse opinions are what this country has been built on, and so there’s a lot of value in that.”

“All our visits had unique qualities and revealed different aspects of the struggle for social justice,” said HOD student Paul Stillman. “Despite frustratingly slow progress, setbacks, and ongoing obstacles, many people are engaged and remain optimistic that change is possible.”

“I would really encourage other students and alums to participate,” said Bogart. “I do think that is one of the benefits of having the Summer Session in Washington, which is so unique and so global in its resource base that it really distinguishes itself from other locations.”

Tags: social justice, workers rights, national session, human rights

Connected Histories: Coaching and Fielding

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Fri, May 24, 2013

ConnPhoto of Leni Wildflowerected Histories: Coaching and Fielding

By Leni Wildflower, HOD alumnus

When I began to write the book I had decided to call The Hidden History of Coaching, something fantastic happened.  My research into the origins of coaching led me to a cluster of social, spiritual and intellectual movements that shaped much of what we associate with the progressive developments of the 60s and 70s. I found myself reconsidering personal experiences that had had a profound impact on me during those years.

At the same time, I began to think with new insight about a later stage of my life, my time at Fielding. Common threads began to emerge, linking all three: the values and principles of coaching, my own coming of age, and the institution that became my intellectual home as a student and a teacher for almost 20 years.

As a student in the 1960s I was deeply moved by the political, social, and cultural shifts that were emerging.  I quit College to work for Students for a Democratic Society, living and doing community organizing in poor urban and rural communities.  I became involved in the women’s movement, went to spiritual intensives, and read psychology extensively.

After raising a family while working full time, I entered Fielding as a PhD student. I thought of this as a distinct new phase in my life, though, like so many of my fellow students, I knew I was bringing with me a wealth of accumulated experience and personal knowledge. Coaching, as a professional activity and a subject of academic curiosity, came later still. 

describe the imageBut in writing The Hidden History of Coaching, I began to see how much of what I was calling our “coaching heritage” was the same mix of influences out of which Fielding had grown. I began to sense an unexpected coherence in these different phases of my life and in the heritage I share with other Fielding alumni.

To take just two examples from The Hidden History:  

On February 1, 1960, four black students in Greensboro, North Carolina sat down in the ‘whites only’ section of a Woolworth’s lunch counter and refused to leave. This took extraordinary courage. The next day 24 students returned to join the demonstration. Within a month, there were 70,000 sitting in all across the South. By July of that year, Woolworths had integrated its lunch counters. 

Meanwhile at the Esalen Institute in Big Sur, California, people were gathering to discuss possibilities for human growth. This was a period of intellectual and social ferment when people were thrown together in unprecedented ways. Barriers were broken down.  Gender roles were challenged, settled structural arrangements disrupted, moral lines redrawn. Esalen served as a prism, taking in light and refracting it in many directions. 

Though times have changed, as Fielding alums, students, faculty and staff, it is important to remember how much we owe to this period. For a whole range of reasons, new possibilities for people were emerging. At the heart of these various movements was the idea that human beings could be greater, achieve more freedom, and accomplish more than had been commonly imagined. 

Leni Wildflower has 20 years experience as an executive coach, author and educator, working in the US, UK, Europe, China and Latin America.  Her passion as a coach is to inspire clients to reach new levels of clarity and effectiveness.
As an innovator and thoughtleader on coaching as a profession, a discipline and a craft, she developed the ground-breaking programme of evidence-based coach training at Fielding Graduate University in Santa Barbara, and co-edited the definitive The Handbook of Knowledge Based Coaching: From Theory to Practice. She is an expert on blended learning and online education.

To contact Leni Wildflower: [email protected]

www.wildflower-consulting.com

Tags: social justice, evidence based coaching, fielding graduate university

ELC alumnus Marion Smith Jr., EdD, appointed to The Washington State Access to Justice Board

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Thu, May 23, 2013

Official announcement by The Washington State Access to Justice Board:Click here to view.

Access to JusticeThe Washington State Access to Justice Board is pleased to welcome their newest member, Marion Smith Jr., EdD. Smith was appointed by the Washington Supreme Court for a three-year term through May 17, 2016.

A career-long urban educator, Smith has served educational communities in Las Vegas, Philadelphia and now Seattle. He is the principal at Lowell Elementary School, a pre-K through Grade 5 elementary school in Seattle, Washington that educates three distinct student populations: general education students, Low Incidence special education students with behavior, development, sensory and/or severe orthopedic impairments, and medically-fragile students. Smith’s work and professional practice is anchored in issues around advocacy, structural inequality and diversity, equity and social justice with a lens on K-12 urban education. He is a member of the Equity and Race Advisory Committee to the Superintendent of Seattle Public Schools.

MarionSmith began his career with the Clark County school district in Las Vegas, Nevada, where he served in a variety of capacities: middle school and high school English teacher, AVID curriculum specialist and middle school dean of students. He was the founding director of culture at Young Scholars Frederick Douglass Charter School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania before coming to Seattle to serve as assistant principal at Madrona K-8.His work toward confronting institutional bias and challenging convention in the education system, and in establishing community partnerships across disciplines will be helpful to the Access to Justice Board’s efforts to eliminate bias in the justice system and strengthen collaborative relationships in support of the Alliance for Equal Justice.

Smith holds an EdD in Education from the School of Educational Leadership & Change(ELC) from Fielding Graduate University, a MA in Education Administration, and a BS in Secondary English Education from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. He has been accepted to Cohort 7 of the Executive Leadership Superintendent Program at Seattle University. The Access to Justice Board was established by the Washington Supreme Court in1994, and is administered by the Washington State Bar Association. The Access to Justice Board recognizes that access to the civil justice system is a fundamental right and works to achieve equal access for those facing economic and other significant barriers.

Tags: social justice, educational leadership, fielding graduate university

Preparations are set for the Sixth Annual International Conference on Positive Aging in Los Angeles, CA in February 2013

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Thu, Nov 29, 2012

PACCommunity members and renowned experts gather to shape confident future for aging population.

Featuring keynote speaker Wendy Lustbader, MSW, live webinar with Ram Dass, award recognition for Dr. James E. Birren,and presentation from Dr. Brian de Vries amongst many others.


According to the U.S. Census Bureau and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, baby boomers will turn 65 at a rate of 10,000 per day for the next decade making them the fastest growing segment of the population. Future implications indicate: “tomorrow’s elderly will have quite different social, demographic, health, and economic characteristics than today’s elderly… as average length of life continues to increase, issues regarding the quality of active life expectancy are likely to assume greater importance.” In anticipation of this growing segment of our population, the Sixth Annual International Conference on Positive Aging, hosted by Fielding Graduate University’s Institute for Social Innovation, brings together notable speakers and workshop leaders to explore new and innovative approaches to positive aging. This year’s topic is “Life-Reimagined: New Approaches to Positive Aging” and the conference will take place February 10-12, 2013 at the Center for Healthy Communities at The California Endowment in Los Angeles.

The Sixth Annual International Conference on Positive Aging includes a variety of workshops that explore themes of creative expression, community, wellness, and life transitions.  Dr. Katrina Rogers, Provost of Fielding Graduate University and Senior Vice-President states:  “Positive aging promotes creativity, wellness, and growth. It means taking personal control of your life instead of being a victim or passive observer. In this model, aging presents a new opportunity for being socially active, for engaging with the community, for being productive, and for seeking a new meaning and purpose in life. This is why the conference is larger each year: people are interested about how to age well.” The conference provides opportunities to engage in physical and creative activities, including yoga, meditation, music, and connecting with others with similar interests.  Conference registration is open to the public.

Wendy Lustbader resized 600The keynote speaker for this year’s conference is Wendy Lustbader, MSW, who currently serves as Affiliate Associate Professor at the University of Washington School of Social Work. Ms. Lustbader has considerable experience working with older people, their families and caregivers, and lectures nationally on subjects related to aging.  As a medical social worker, she specialized for almost twenty years in out-patient mental health at the Pike Market Medical Clinic in Seattle, and has also practiced in a home health care agency, hospital geriatric unit, and nursing home. Ms. Lustbader’s first book was co-authored with Nancy Hooyman, Taking Care of Aging Family Members. This is a practical guide to caregiving which is still considered the best book of its kind by experts in the field of aging. At the opening reception on Sunday, February 10th, Ms. Lustbader will speak about her latest book, Life Gets Better: The Unexpected Pleasures of Growing Older.

 

Ram Dass resized 600The conference will also host a webinar with world-renowned American contemporary spiritual teacher and author Ram Dass. He is known for his personal and professional associations with Timothy Leary at Harvard University in the early 1960's, for his travels to India and his relationship with the Hindu guru Neem Karoli Baba, and for founding the charitable organizations Seva Foundation and Hanuman Foundation. His practice of karma yoga or spiritual service has opened up millions to their deep, yet individuated spiritual practice and path. Dass continues to uphold the boddhisatva ideal for others through his compassionate sharing of true knowledge and vision. His unique skill in getting people to cut through and feel divine love without dogma is still a positive influence on people all over the world.

 

BirrenPic resized 600Dr. James E. Birren is one of the "reigning pioneers" in the organized field of gerontology since the 1940s. He is a past president of The Gerontological Society of America, and author of over 250 publications. Dr. Birren will receive Fielding's Creative Longevity and Wisdom Award in recognition of his six decades of seminal contributions including the influential work on guided autobiography.

 

 

 

 

Brian de Vries resized 600Featured speaker Dr. Brian de Vries, Professor of Gerontology at San Francisco State University, and will share his extensive work on aging experiences, including bereavement among gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender adults.  He is a Fellow of the Gerontological Society of American, a member of the Leadership Council for the American Society on Aging, and co-chair of the Lesbian and Gay Aging Issues Network constituency group. Most recently, Dr. de Vries has become a policy advisor for AARP, California. 

 

 

 

Attendees include professionals in the fields of health care, insurance, life planning, care giving and lifelong learning, as well as those interested in ageism, gaining, spirituality, creativity, wellness, entrepreneurship and more.

Early registration for the three day conference is $275 until January 14th, 2013, and $300 after. Single day tickets are $125. Registration includes meals and opening reception Sunday evening.  To attend only the Sunday dinner reception featuring keynote speaker Wendy Lustbader is $80.

To register, please visit: http://positiveaging2013.eventbrite.com/#

For more information and updates about the conference, please visit the website: http://www.positiveaging.fielding.edu/

Join the Facebook page for speaker updates and event announcements: Positive Aging Conference FACEBOOK 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tags: creativity, social justice, educational leadership, diversity, religion, intentional change, conference, sociology, self-esteem, international, adult learning, higher education, fielding graduate university, human development, learning

Fielding doctoral student Michael Wilson actively helping homeless

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Thu, Nov 08, 2012

Housing with health services helps homeless in Surrey, BC: Official opening November 8th, 2013

Fielding Graduate University doctoral student and Executive Director of the Phoenix Drug and Alcohol Recovery and Education Society, Michael Wilson, play active role in the project.

Phoenix HouseQuibble Creek Health and Phoenix Transition Housing Centre is a partnership between the Province, the City of Surrey and Fraser Health Authority and contains 52 supportive housing units and 15 short-term transitional recovery beds. The building includes Fraser Health’s Recovery and Assessment Centre, with 25 beds for men and women requiring 24-hour recovery and assessment services, and a primary care, substance use and mental health clinic.  

The Recovery and Assessment Centre is a safe, sheltered environment to assist individuals recovering from acute intoxication. An interdisciplinary team of professionals including nurses, substance use support workers and outreach workers care for clients and connect them with the network of mental health and substance use services available.  

Michael, currently in the HOD doctoral program at Fielding, states: “The Phoenix Society’s mission is to create a therapeutic community, which provides clients with personal, social and psychological supports at every step of their recovery process. The new building will provide an array of additional supports and opportunities for our society to better meet the needs of the population we serve. The planning process to bring this development to construction has been years in the making and I would like to thank the Province, the City of Surrey, Kwantlen Polytechnic University and Fraser Health for the resources and support provided for our current Phoenix Centre and the new Quibble Creek Health and Phoenix Transition Housing Centre.”  

Clients at the primary care, substance use and mental health clinic receive care and treatment for medical, substance use and mental health issues. The team of health-care professionals include physicians, psychiatrists, nurses, clinical counsellors and social workers. Staff provides health information and education as well as some services on an outreach basis.   

Mayor Dianne Watts, City of Surrey, BC, commented: “Since 2009, we’ve taken over 350 people off the street in Surrey and found them permanent housing, thanks to our strong partnerships with the Province and community organizations.  This new development will help our most vulnerable citizens break free from the cycle of homelessness and poverty. We are helping people build healthier lives by providing them with the supports and housing they need.”

Tags: social justice, intentional change, leadership, higher education, fielding graduate university, human rights