Fielding Graduate University News

Tweet Talkers: Media Psych Students Share Research in UK

Posted by Joanna Hesketh on Wed, Feb 10, 2016

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A team of media psychology PhD students and faculty from Fielding Graduate University recently leaped the pond to present research and share ideas at University of Salford in Manchester, England.

The Fielding team presented “And Yet They Tweet: The Complexity of Tweets from the Streets of Tahrir” at the Salford International Media Festival. Having emerged from a research practicum offered by Fielding faculty and team research lead Regina Tuma, PhD, the project examined the potential complexity of messages limited to 140 characters:

Does that limited space allow room for meaningful and complex exchanges—especially during a time of upheaval, as was the case with the exchanges leading up to the 2011 uprising in Tahrir Square? 

“We always hear people point to the insignificance of social media content, especially Twitter,” said Tuma. “This seemed the perfect opportunity to apply the literature in psychology that looks at the complexity of our exchanges. Normally, the unit of analysis in those studies are lengthy speeches or articles. The novelty for us in this study was exploring whether the idea of complexity of meaning and exchanges could fit the brief Twitter format.”

In addition to Tuma, the Media Psychology research team includes Fielding alum Lynn Temenski, PhD, recent Fielding graduate Rafael E. Linera-Rivera, PhD, and doctoral students Judith Manassen-Ramon, Daniel Loewus-Deitch, and Joanna Hesketh.  

The Fielding group also participated in a joint international workshop with Dr. Sharon Coen of Salford University and students from the school’s media psychology program. Titled “Can You See Me Now?”, the workshop explored the role of visuals in media psychology including viral images, selfie culture and self-portrayal, and visuals in politics and social media.

Linera-Rivera said the workshop discussion broadened his knowledge of media psychology outside of the United States.

“It was a great experience for a doctoral student in media psychology to see how the subject is developing internationally,” he said.

“Media is in our hands, in our heads, and is shaping our culture,” Tuma added. “Both Sharon Coen at Salford and I see a growing need for these exchanges. Fielding and Salford should be central to that internationalizing effort since both universities share common history, and both offer degrees in media psychology.”

Watch a video from the University of Salford visit.

For information on the Media Psychology program at Fielding Graduate University, contact Pam Matovelle at pmatovelle@fielding.edu.

Tags: Media psychology, social media

Fielding's Media Psychology Program Leaves an Impression on Digital Hollywood

Posted by Hilary Molina on Wed, Nov 04, 2015
 by Tunisha Singleton, MA - Current PhD Student | Fielding Graduate University | Co-Chair - APA Div 46 Student Committee |  Member - APA Div 46, 47 | http://www.linkedin.com/pub/tunisha-singleton/85/43a/a82

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Fielding Graduate University made their presence felt at Digital Hollywood in Marina Del Rey, California. Digital Hollywood is a reputable conference in the convergence of entertainment and technology, bringing together the field’s top executives and developers. As a sponsor of the four-day summit, Fielding Graduate University’s Media Psychology program supportively added to the event by bringing fresh perspectives and specialists in cutting-edge fields.

digital_hollywood_hogg_and_rutledge.jpgDigital Hollywood is among the world’s best venues combining technology research and design. The setting became a perfect fit for media psychology’s scholar-practitioner model that aims to understand the psychological impact of media use and creation. Over 25 members of Fielding's media psychology community were present, including prospective and current students, alumni, and faculty.

Director of the Media Psychology PhD Program Jerri Lynn Hogg, PhD, was in attendance and noted that the overall experience was beneficial for both parties. “Patterns in media and new technology emerged in many of the panel discussions,” said Dr. Hogg. “While industry experts work to figure out how to use content and make new platforms, researchers from our program can provide this type of information by explaining the psychology behind it. So it was very energizing to connect industry developers with researchers.”

Digital Hollywood is broken up into multiple tracks emphasizing a particular area within entertainment and technology. A few tracks, for example, include: “Immersive Entertainment: From Movie Theatres to Interactive Surfaces," “The Women’s Summit & Festival: Content, Discussion, & Recognition,” and “Virtual and Augmented Reality: From Sense of Presence to Full Embodiment.” Panels are designed to focus on a specific topic under each theme with speakers who have exceled in that particular field. And representatives from Media Psychology were not only in attendance, but were also called to lead as pioneering examples.

Director of the Media Psychology Masters and Certificate Program, Garry Hare, PhD, moderated a panel titled “AR – VR and the Human Brain: The Impact of Neuromarketing on the Real-Time Design of Immersive Entertainment and Advertising Productions.” Exploring the cognitive science behind the visualization of complex data offered opportunities to showcase the innovative work of Media Psychology graduates.

“Students and faculty experience first hand innovations in immersive media, augmented reality and the future of both mass market and targeted productions,” said Dr. Hare. “Presentations by faculty on media neuroscience and the creation of AR applications were extremely well received, opening the door for future featured panels, presentations, Dr._Christophe_Morin.jpgreal-time research and collaborative product development.”

Leading the way on marketing neuroscience is Fielidng media psychology faculty member Christophe Morin, PhD, whose presentation was filled with stimulating and cutting-edge information that rang new to Digital Hollywood. As CEO of neuromarking agency SalesBrain, Dr. Morin believes that the psychology of neuromarketing is indispensable to the Digital Hollywood community. “The field of neuromarketing offers research methods that measure and predict the effect of media on our nervous system” said Dr. Morin. “I was pleased to see that content producers and marketers are very interested in the field of media neuroscience because our research can explain and predict the effect of advertising, games, and even movies on the brain.”

Interest in neuromarketing and other critical areas were expressed through the consistent flow of attention received at Fielding’s interactive information booth. Maintained over the course of the entire conference, faculty and alumni were able to showcase Fielding’s Media Psychology’s new certificate program with two new specialized concentrations - Media Neuroscience or Brand Psychology and Audience Engagement. Under each specialized focus, the three-course certificate allows industry professionals to gain an understanding of the "why" and "how" behind their work by applying psychological theory.

Fielding media psychology faculty member and Director of the Media Psychology Research Center Pamela Rutledge, PhD, spent several hours interacting with Digital Hollywood’s advertising and creative professionals about the new emphasis of Brand Psychology. “This certificate is designed to help you connect with the consumer and take advantage of the socially-connected, 24/7 world we live in,” said Dr. Rutledge. “Entertainment and technology is not just about the tools...it’s about human behavior. Media environments change. New technologies emerge. But human needs and goals do not. So here you’ll learn to apply psychology to develop and deliver a brand identity and core story that captures your audience’s wants.”

For the Fielding to sponsor Digital Hollywood, several positive outcomes can arise including careers for alumni, research projects for faculty and internships for current students. Third year media psychology doctorl student Matthew Price remarked on how significant it is for Fielding to be present at these events and how valuable it was to be in attendance, “Digital Hollywood was a terrific opportunity for me to network with industry luminaries and examine my place academically and professionally in a real world setting. I think this is one of the truest benefits of an education from Fielding; exposure to the industry and an opportunity to apply our education in a constructive environment."

The Fielding community received an overall enthusiastic reception from Digital Hollywood participants with high anticipation for returning to the next seasonal event. Taking advantage of the high profile opportunity provided by Digital Hollywood’s setting, faculty and alum showcased their unique approach to methodology, production research, and content creation. Doctoral, masters, and certificate programs alike - the Media Psychology program represented Fielding Graduate University well as a formidable leader in higher education, research, and applied innovation.

 

 

 

Tags: Media psychology, technology, psychology, fielding faculty, social media, digital learning, Distributed education, fielding graduate university, distance education, APA Div 46, PhD

Fielding's New Media Psychology Program Director Jerri Lynn Hogg, PhD On Media Psychology and Technology for Good

Posted by Hilary Molina on Wed, Oct 14, 2015

As president of the American Psychological Association’s Division 46-Society for Media Psychology and Technology, Jerri Lynn Hogg, PhD, now takes on the role as program director of media psychology at Fielding Graduate University.

Jerri Lynn HoggDr. Hogg stepped right into her new role with ease. Coming from years of grounded experience in both academic and professional settings, her teaching experience at a variety of post-secondary organizations, along with her numerous years of involvement in the media psychology program at Fielding, Dr. Hogg is poised and ready to drive media psychology further into the educational forefront of the 21st century. Dr. Hogg's vision of the future of media psychology as a disciple was clearly outlined during her interview for the position of director:

The future of media psychology is impacted by the psychological foundations which form the building blocks of this discipline. These building blocks are what separate us from big media studies departments and other educational areas that hover in the same research space as media psychology. Media psychology is a broad umbrella-based psychology that is grounded in psychology, and also engages theories and research from a variety of other fields that study media and technology.

At Fielding, I believe that we are at a place where we have the opportunity to do something special, to influence peoples’ lives in important and meaningful ways. From understanding how mobile applications can best be used to encourage fitness, or stimulate happiness and mental well-being to create powerful advocacy campaigns and disaster relief efforts, such as the one most recently implemented by the Red Cross app that facilitated donations for the relief efforts in Nepal; we can learn about, demonstrate and research, how emergent technologies are enhancing our lives in powerful ways. By studying the psychological components engaged when we connect with media and technology we can inform better design and application.

For example, we can apply theory to emergent technologies to create and further define dynamic learning environments, use augmented and virtual reality to find new ways to understand and view the world, create delivery models that are media rich in presence, yet can cross geographical and time boundaries, and we can construct media that facilitates socially responsible advocacy for the betterment of humanity. With the ability to connect in more meaningful ways, collaborate cross-boundaries and cultures, share knowledge by making information more readily available and understandable, media psychology is a force for motivation, well-being, and good.

In her newest role as program director, Dr. Hogg continues to affirm the direction she sees the program going and why Fielding is the place for this vision. "It is my goal to continue to foster an energetic research center in media psychology which includes a collaborative learning space and a think-tank environment that provides businesses, organizations, nonprofits, and foundations a place to seek advice, consult, and research the intersection of human behavior and media and technology," stated Dr. Hogg. "My vision for the media psychology program within Fielding is to continue to establish the culture and identity of the program with administration, admissions and marketing, and the university in general, so we can best advertise, promote and attract students who are interested in media psychology...We are best aligned for positive outcomes, and impact, that includes strong student learning and ground breaking research, when there is a good fit. It is the story, the vision, and the cohesive message that allows not only the potential to understand who we are, but creates the vision of what we commit to as a program, a program that embraces the breadth of the field of media psychology in a foundational manner and offers specializations as our core niche. Current proposed certificates in neuroscience, brand psychology, and immersive media are a good start in this direction."

One of Dr. Hogg's areas of interest as a media psychologist is to look at virtual and augmented environments to see how people can bring a sense of presence to these environments - to make it feel as real as when we share physical presence. She frequently speaks on psychological components and influences of media and technology on human behavior and she continues to uncover new areas for research and understanding.

Dr. Hogg began her career studying engineering and then made the unusual jump to journalism and communications. While it might not have made sense at the time to make this transition, it fueled her interest in the science and the technology behind how people are driven to connect and communicate. To this day, she continues to examine a variety of interests, which are primarily based around how media influences people's lives, relationships, and humans make meaning out of life in a highly digitized world. Her passion continues to remain in the ways people connect and make meaning in digital environments. As Dr. Hogg continues her studies as a researcher and as a graduate of the media psychology program at Fielding, she would like to give back to her university and the field she proudly represents.

Tags: Media psychology, APA, psychology, fielding faculty, social media, leadership, clinical psychology, fielding graduate university, graduate education, scholar practitioner

Marketing Music to Fans: Learning How to Play

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Thu, Jan 30, 2014

The Economist

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Fielding alumna Gigi Johnson, EdD (ELC '11), was recently interviewed for an article about the connection between music and social media marketing in The Economist.

The Economist- Dec 13th 2013, 12:41 by G.M. | SAN FRANCISCO:

It has been a tough decade for the music industry, but some are beginning to hear a happier tune. Employment for musicians is growing due to increased demand for live performances. The average hourly wage for musicians is now around $22, well more than the countrywide average of $16.

A 2012 Berklee College of Music report found that the average personal income of more than 5,000 surveyed musicians was $55,561, which is higher than the national average of nearly $43,000. (More than half of the surveyed musicians work at least three jobs, and income from musical work, such as compositions, recordings and performances, accounts for roughly 80% of take-home pay.) The industry also has several niche growth areas, including startups, video games to music therapy. 

"It makes me very hopeful for our musicians here and what they can do," said Peter Spellman, director of Berklee's Career Development Center, to Forbes. "But it does require a certain amount of business savvy and marketing savvy, in combination with your musical savvy, to succeed."

To arm musicians with some of this savvy, a handful of American universities are now teaching courses designed to help students get ahead in an evolving industry. In programs at Berklee; the University of California, Los Angeles; Belmont University in Nashville; the University of Southern California; and Syracuse University in upstate New York, among other places, musicians, recording engineers, tour managers and industry executives teach classes in marketing, promotion, social media, technology and entrepreneurship.

Musicians continue to struggle to get royalties, so Gigi Johnson, executive director at the Maremel Institute, a California-based media consultant, spends a lot of time teaching students how to exploit social-media data to make more informed decisions about marketing music to fans.

"Some of my music students have 50,000 YouTube fans, but don't know what to do with them," Ms Johnson said. She teaches her students how to discern the "psychographics" of fans from back-end diagnostics: where do fans hang out? How do they see themselves, and where do they eat? This data can be used to create targeted sponsorship campaigns with specific brands, she says.

To read the full article, click here.

gigiGigi Johnson, as Executive Director of the Maremel Institute, explores how technology is transforming media, creative industries, education, and our shared expectations for the future. Maremel advises organizations and creates learning programs to help university leaders, media executives, and creative professionals rethink how to thrive under new technologies and business models.

She speaks extensively and teaches part-time at UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music, focusing on digital disruption of creative industries. She has enjoyed teaching as well for five years with University of Navarra in Pamplona, Spain and at the launch of the new creative industries program at the Higher Colleges of Technology in Abu Dhabi. Until 2005, she had been Executive Director of the UCLA Anderson’s Entertainment and Media Management Institute.  Before joining UCLA in 1999, she had been SVP/Managing Director at Bank of America, where she spent most of a decade in their Entertainment/Media practice, financing M&A in changing media industries.

Johnson received her doctorate in education/media studies from Fielding Graduate University, her MBA from UCLA Anderson, and her BA in Cinema-Television Production from the University of Southern California. She is a member of the Interactive Peer Group in the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, and actively involved in many research and industry organizations.


Tags: Media psychology, educational leadership, Marketing, social media, digital learning, fielding graduate university

Dr. Bernard Luskin: Join the Society for Media Psychology & Technology

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Thu, Nov 15, 2012

Dr. Luskin has an exceptional history as an administrator, educator and leader in media psychology. Bernie Luskin has made many contributions and pioneered new programs," said Dr. Judith Kuipers, President Emeritus of Fielding Graduate University. "While at Fielding, Bernie developed and launched the first MA Ph.D. program in Media Psychology and EdD program in Media Studies in any university. Partnering with UCLA Extension, he launched a successful master's degree program in Media Psychology and Social Change, and at Touro University Worldwide he launched an MA degree program in Media and Communications Psychology," said Kuipers. From PR Newswire 

Join The Society for Media Psychology & Technology

Published on Psychology Today (http://www.psychologytoday.com)

This article explains the APA Society for Media Psychology and Technology and gives you an overview of media psychology refined from many years in this field.

 

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Creative media applications in learning are rapidly expanding. Focus on MOOCS, online and blended learning, augmented reality, artificial intelligence; robotics in commerce, education, public policy, telehealth, and military applications from inner to outer space are increasing. Twenty-first century educational institutions need more sophisticated faculty and staff who understand higher concepts in media arts and sciences. Individuals must now grasp the implications of media to perform competitively in the majority of new and emerging occupational specialties.

Theories in psychology are fundamental.

Media psychology includes the understanding of the physical and emotional aspects of the brain. Range of emotion, expression, persuasion, sexuality and gender are among the areas of continuing study within media psychology. Also included are theories of attention, persuasion, emotional control, believability, situational cognition, assessment, learning, mind mapping, persistence, reinforcement, mastery, success and failure. “Pscybermedia,” is a neologism combining psychology (human behavior), artificial intelligence (cybernetics) and media (pictures, graphics and sound).

Applying the art and science of media psychology has become essential to effective teaching. Media psychologists study and report the effects of research on sensory and cognitive processes that impact cultural attitudes and values.

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Effects studies show the way.

Effects research examines how the various news and entertainment media affect, and are affected by, audiences, their demographics and numbers. Examples of media influences include the formation, maintenance and/or change of individual and group stereotypes. On-camera and off-camera diversity representation, the framing of media stories and news, advertising, public service messages, political messages and more, directly influence overt and nuanced human behavior.

Understanding applied media psychology is important for those who work with and within the public and private sectors. Specifically included are government, military, public and private health services and all areas of telecommunications, teletherapy and commerce. The pursuit of commercial opportunities and innovations in the delivery of online learning for traditional education institutions and corporate university populations are equally important areas.  Media psychologists are among the professionals who consult with producers of printed and electronic books, films, those who appear as guests or hosts on radio or television, and all who offer on-line services involving advice, counseling information, expert testimony in litigation and dispute resolution.

 

Scholar practitioners’ are us.describe the image

scholar/practitioner approach is increasingly important for many career professionals. The scientist-clinical and applied practitioner is a natural disciple of the media psychology specialty.  Thucydides, author of The History of the Peloponnesian War written in 431 B.C.E., is reputed to have said it best:

“A nation that draws too broad a difference between its scholars and its warriors will have its thinking being done by cowards, and its fighting done by fools.”

Combining research, theory and practice maximizes new opportunities in health services, public service and public policy, publishing, education, entertainment and commerce for those with a solid foundational understanding of theories in psychology and their connection to human behavior.

The APA Society for Media Psychology and Technology will heighten awareness, open new career options and serve as a catalyst in providing a forum so that working together we can achieve a better world.

Society Website:   http://www.apa.org/divisions/div46/index...

References:

Luskin, Bernard Jay, (1970) An Identification and Examination of Obstacles to the Development of Computer Assisted Instruction, University Microfilm ID: 7199656, 288 pages

Luskin, B. J., & Friedland, L. (1998). Task force report: Media psychology and new technologies. Washington, DC: Division of Media Psychology, Division 46 of the American Psychological Association. Link:http://www.apa.org/divisions/div46/articles.html

Luskin, B.J. (2003, May/June) Media psychology: A field that’s time is here, The California PsychologistMay/June, 2003, reprinted, National Psychologist

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Dr. Bernard Luskin is President-elect (2014), of the Society for Media Psychology and Technology, the Media Psychology Division 46 of the American Psychological Association. In 2011, the Society recognized Bernie Luskin with its award for Distinguished Lifetime Achievement in Media Psychology. He can be reached at: BernieLuskin@gmail.comwww.LuskinInternational.com.

                                                     

 

Tags: Media psychology, psychology, sociology, social media, leadership, higher education, learning, research

Highlighting the uniqueness of students, faculty, and alumni: Fielding Graduate University introduces new Pinterest page

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Fri, Nov 02, 2012

Let the "pinning" begin!describe the image

www.Pinterest.com/FieldingU

Pinterest has captivated media, public relations, and social media business communities unlike any other. Visual bookmarking and social networking is easier than ever before, and now Fielding students, faculty, and alumni can establish a presence on Pinterest by a simple click of the “pin it” button.

Why the interest in Pinterest?

Recent new data shows that it is the fourth largest referral network after passing Yahoo and now only sits behind Google, Facebook and Twitter. Pinterest traffic grew by 43.7% from June to July and grew again by 33.33% from July to August.  In the last 12 months according to Experian, Pinterest has grown 5,124 percent.

The goal for the Fielding Pinterest page is to be a place for the community to share images, links, and photos of achievements and experiences that visually convey what Fielding is all about.  Fielding is known for being a close community, and in this day and age, social media is one of the easiest ways to connect in a virtual setting.  The beauty of the Fielding Pinterest page is that by “pinning” an image on a web page, like the cover of a book recently published by alumni or a picture of a recent graduate smiling as they receive their diploma, users uniquely connect and share ideas quickly and easily. 

The pinning is just beginning on the Fielding Pinterest page:describe the image

The Fielding Community

Education

Graduation Photos

Events

Centers & Initiatives

Covers, Flyers & Postcards  

Fielding Graduate University Pinterest page: www.Pinterest.com/FieldingU

Do you have a suggestion for new Fielding Pinterest board? Please email marketing@fielding.edu with ideas.

Keep an eye out for the Pinterest logo coming soon to the Fielding Graduate University website. Through it you can quickly share your favorite Fielding web pages and images.

Happy pinning!

 

Tags: social media

Fielding alumna Melle Starsen presents in the US and the UK with research of stereotypes in media

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Fri, Oct 26, 2012

Fielding Graduate University alumna (ELC '11) Melle Starsen, EdD, presents her doctoral research across the United States and United Kingdom.

Starsen started off 2012 by traveling to the University of Oregon in Portland, OR, Loughborough University in Loughborough, UK, and John Moores University in Liverpool, UK presenting her research titled: "Cool to be cruel: Mean-spiritedness in 21st century children's TV sitcoms"  Starsen cites, "Much has been written about the proven negative effects viewing television violence has on children and yet there is another kind of violent role-modeling embedded in an unlikely place: children’s television sitcoms. This content analysis investigated live-action children’s half-hour sitcoms and discovered the presence of relational aggression and superiority humor, both of which rely on brutally treating other humans as inferior. The television characters seek revenge on each other, intentionally make others look bad or stupid, humiliate peers and parents, and are rarely punished for their mean-spiritedness and cruelty. The children’s sitcoms are behavioral blueprints of lies and deceit, as the characters unashamedly cheat others, defraud parents and other adults, and attempt to make peers and teachers look stupid and in the vernacular of the culture, “clueless.” Further, stereotypes are not only presented as acceptable, but are reinforced by frequent inclusion into the action. This study discovered myriad examples of mean-spiritedness and cruelty on the part of characters in the programs, ranging in frequency from 7 to 31.25 per half-hour episode, averaging 33.75 per hour for programs viewed. The study includes recommendations for parents and educators to help offset the possible negative effects of these programs."

For the next part of the year, Starsen began presenting her next topic: "Hidden messages: Archetypes in Blaxploitation Films" at the 2012 Film and History Conference-Film and Myth in Milwaukee, WI in September. Starsen states: "Many movie critics and researchers have rebuked Blaxploitation films (1970-1975) as sexist, racist, and, most of all, degrading to black audiences and the black community.  However, this empirical study of blaxploitation films has determined that far from presenting a negative image of the black community, many of the entries in this genre do in fact provide embedded archetypes that present consistent messages for black audiences about the need to eschew exploitation of their own people and communities and instead, support education, crime-reduction programs, and community outreach to improve the communities. The films, though accused of being violent and brutal, actually present messages about the need for black communities to stand together and right the wrongs of the past by supporting an almost sovereign nation-within-a-nation."

Starsen presented this research at the Midwest Popular Culture Association in Columbus, OH in October along with a second presentation titled "The metamorphosis of modern television news into 'entertainment propaganda" which she is scheduled to present at the upcoming Media and Politics Conference at the University on Bedfordshire, Luton, UK on Nov. 1-2, 2012.  

Starsen currently serves as assistant professor of communication at Upper Iowa University  which has an international and online presence; teaching television history, editing, writing for media, television production, media law and ethics, journalistic and online writing, and public speaking. Previously an instructor in communication for 10 years teaching screenwriting and speech. Published author with two novels, short stories in academic journals, and articles in national publications and journals. TV producer-director-writer at university PBS affiliate for nine years, producing documentary programs and PSAs. Researched, wrote and acted as location unit manager for American documentary on Dr Who. Journalist and freelance writer for 20 years, with articles in publications such as The New York Times. Wrote screenplay that is currently in pre-production. Appeared as extra in two films. Ten years’ experience acting and doing technical work in theatre. Ongoing research interests include: 1) using media such as film in successful college teaching; 2) importing real-life experience into university teaching pedagogy; and 3) researching and studying the millennial generation, so-called “echo boomers,” and their visually-oriented learning styles and short attention spans. Hobbies include photography, fossil hunting and collecting sea pottery shards from the UK.

Tags: Media psychology, conference, social media, international, human development, learning, research

Fielding Graduate University is the only MA-ED program with a concentration in social media and education

Posted by Hilary Edwards on Wed, Oct 03, 2012

describe the imageFielding Graduate University is the only program in the US that offers a Master of Arts in Education (MA-ED) program with a concentration focused on the integration of social media and education. 

There are many programs that look at how social media can be used for marketing purposes, but none that explore the important topic of how it can be effectively used in education. 

The dramatic growth of online courses, the use of mobile technologies, and the impact of social networking in education is undeniable. Increasingly, educators in schools, colleges, and workplaces are being called upon to merge technology and teaching. With this comes a demand for high quality instructors who can provide effective, technology-driven education to a growing number of students at all levels.

Fielding faculty are all well published and recognized in the field of education and particularly in the integration of technology in education, and in online teaching and learning.  Fielding faculty are not only scholars in the area, but they practice what they preach.  Rena M Palloff, PhD, expalins: “We all teach online and take great joy in helping others become highly effective online teachers as well as effective users of cutting edge technology. Our graduates are uniquely situated to address technology in education in many ways and at many levels. “

Fielding MA-ED graduate Jessica Ward states “Fielding completely prepared me for the fast-paced and adult-centered world of online learning and teaching. The skills I have gained have provided me with the confidence I needed to go out and teach in the digital world.”

At Fielding, students focus in high-demand areas: online teaching and learning, emerging technologies, and the impact of social media on education. Graduates leave with advanced knowledge and specialized skills including: effective instruction either online or through the use of technology in the classroom; course and curriculum design; assessment; and the effective use of social media and social networking.

Interested in learning more about the program or know of someone who is?

Information session dates and times are listed below:

General MA-ED Webinar Information Session Schedule

Thursday, October 11 4PM PST
Thursday, October 18 4PM PST
Saturday, October 27 10:00AM PST
Wednesday, October 31 4PM PST
Thursday, November 8 4PM PST
Thursday, November 15 4PM PST
Tuesday, December 4 4PM PST
Tuesday, December 18 4PM PST

General MA-ED Lunchtime Informational Webinars

Tuesday, October 9, 2012 - 9:00-9:45AM, 10:00-10:45AM
Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - 11:00-11:45AM, 12:00-12:45PM
Tuesday, October 23, 2012 9:00-9:45AM, 10:00-10:45AM
Tuesday, October 30, 2012 - 11:00-11:45AM, 12:00-12:45PM

Click here for more information: 
http://www.fielding.edu/programs/education/online-masters-education

Register for the webinar at www.fielding.edu/admission

Contact Chrystie Lewis | cllewis@fielding.edu | 805.898.4039

To view the program brochure: MA-ED Brochure

Tags: social media, digital learning, adult learning, higher education, graduate education, distance education

Media Psychology Director Interviewed on "Trailblazers"

Posted by Sylvia Williams on Wed, Mar 07, 2012
karen dill

Karen Dill, PhD, was recently a guest on the Dr. Howard Gluss radio program “Trailblazers”. Dill is the director and a faculty member of Fielding’s Media Psychology Doctoral Program. The Gluss program airs on channel KFNX; his guests are renowned experts in a variety of fields with whom he “examines how our passions are discovered, embraced, and become a force to create cultural and social change.”

Dill was invited to talk about media violence, misogyny, and racism with Joseph Burgo, PhD, an expert in celebrity fantasy, narcissism, and reality. A description of the program and a link to the podcast can be found at http://drgluss.podhoster.com/index.php?pid=29626

 

Tags: Media psychology, psychology, violence, social media

Fielding Supports Goals of Occupy Wall Street

Posted by Sylvia Williams on Tue, Jan 03, 2012

The gap between rich and poor is greater than ever before in our lifetimes, and we need to stand up for those who are trying to improve their circumstances and provide for their families. As a graduate institution serving a community of scholars and practitioners who are devoted to learning and social change, we stand in support of movements like Occupy Wall Street, which attempt to create dialogue and collective engagement of our citizens at such critical social moments.

Students at institutions of higher education are being forced to pay more for tuition and go deeper into debt because of cuts in state funding and federal aid programs. The Social/Ecological Justice and Diversity Commission of the Academic Senate at Fielding Graduate University applauds the goals of the Occupy Wall Street movement, which continues to highlight the inequity and unfairness of the society in which we live. We strongly support the movement and wish it every success. We are in this together and support activities that foster continuing dialogue around these important social issues and strengthen our democratic engagement.

Tags: APA, social justice, educational leadership, Organizational development, Marketing, social media, Advising and Student Development, digital learning, sustainability, development, philanthropy, higher education, human rights, graduate education, environmental justice